Spanish


Spanish: Introduction

Faculty Affiliation

Arts and Science

Degree Programs

Spanish

MA and PhD

  • Fields:
    • Hispanic Linguistics;
    • Hispanic Literatures and Cultures

Collaborative Specializations

The following collaborative specializations are available to students in participating degree programs as listed below:

Overview

The Department of Spanish offers graduate programs leading to two degrees: Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. MA and PhD students specialize in one of two fields:

  • Hispanic Linguistics

  • Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies and must also satisfy the department's requirements stated below. In all cases, programs must be approved by the department.

The application process for the Master of Arts program is competitive; meeting the minimum standards for admission does not guarantee acceptance.

The admissions process for the Doctor of Philosophy program is competitive; it is based on a number of factors in addition to grades. The principal factors include the ability of the department to offer graduate work in the applicant's preferred areas of interest, the availability of appropriate supervisory resources, and the suitability of the applicant in relation to the academic profile and programs of the department. The department does not allow direct entry to the PhD program with a BA, nor does it allow MA students to transfer to the PhD program before the coursework for the MA is completed.

Contact and Address

Web: www.spanport.utoronto.ca
Email: spanport@chass.utoronto.ca or spanish.graduate@utoronto.ca

Telephone: (416) 813-4080 or (416) 813-4082
Fax: (416) 813-4084

Department of Spanish
University of Toronto
Victoria College
Room 208, 91 Charles Street West
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1K7
Canada


Spanish: Graduate Faculty

Full Members

Antebi, Susan - AM, PhD (Graduate Coordinator)
Colantoni, Laura - MA, PhD
Cuervo, M. Cristina - PhD
Davidson, Bob - BA, AM, PhD
Iglesias, Yolanda - BA, BA, MA, PhD
Jagoe, Eva-Lynn - BA, MA, PhD
Munjic, Sanda - BA, AM, PhD
Perez-Leroux, Ana Teresa - MA, PhD (Chair and Graduate Chair)
Rodriguez, Nestor - BA, PhD
Rupp, Stephen - BA, MA, MPH, MA, PhD
Sarabia, Rosa - BA, PhD

Members Emeriti

Burke, James - BA, MA, PhD
Ellis, Keith A.A. - BA, PhD
Glickman, Robert - AB, AM, PhD
Gulsoy, Joseph - BA, BA, MA, PhD
Leon, Pedro - BA, MA, PhD
Neglia, Erminio - BA, MA, PhD
Percival, Anthony - BA, MA, PhD
Skyrme, Raymond - BA, MA, PhD
Webster, Jill - BA, MA, PhD

Associate Members

Alvarez, Natalie - BA, MA, PhD
Alves dos Santos Rato, Anabela - PhD
Ramirez-Salazar, Manuel - BA, MA, PhD
Rivas, Victor - BA, AM, PhD
Steele, Jeffrey - BA, MA, PhD
Zavala, Oswaldo - LHD, LHD


Spanish: Spanish MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

The application process for the Master of Arts program is competitive; meeting the minimum standards for admission does not guarantee acceptance.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Spanish's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree in Spanish or a cognate discipline from a recognized university.

  • Fluency in spoken and written Spanish with a general background in Hispanic literature and/or linguistics, normally demonstrated through undergraduate coursework.

  • Applicants apply online and should arrange for electronic submission of the following materials:

    • A one-page statement of purpose, outlining the applicant's areas of interest (in English).

    • A sample of written work in Spanish (10 to 12 pages).

    • Two letters of recommendation, ideally in English (one of the letters must comment on the applicant's fluency in Spanish).

    • A curriculum vitae in English.

Program Requirements

  • 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) at the graduate level.

  • MA students specialize in one of two fields:

    • Hispanic Linguistics.

    • Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

  • The specialization requires that each student complete coursework in accordance with distribution requirements for each field, defined in terms of the various areas of the graduate curriculum.

  • Courses are selected in consultation with the Graduate Coordinator. With departmental approval, courses may be taken in a cognate unit (e.g., Comparative Literature, French, History, Linguistics, Medieval Studies, Women's Studies).

  • It is the department's expectation that full-time students will complete all program requirements in one academic year. The MA program is also available on a part-time basis. Applicants should be aware that part-time students are not eligible for funding.

  • Students in the field of Hispanic Linguistics must have completed an introductory course in linguistics (LIN100Y or an equivalent course). Students who have not completed LIN100Y as part of their undergraduate studies must take this course in the summer directly preceding their admission to the MA program.

Program Length

2 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W);
6 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time


Spanish: Spanish PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The admissions process for the Doctor of Philosophy program is competitive; it is based on a number of factors in addition to grades. The principal factors include the ability of the department to offer graduate work in the applicant's preferred areas of interest, the availability of appropriate supervisory resources, and the suitability of the applicant in relation to the academic profile and programs of the department.

The department does not allow direct entry to the PhD program with a BA degree. Students in the MA program in Spanish who would like to continue to the PhD must apply through the regular application process; there is no process for direct transfer from MA to PhD.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Spanish's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Master's degree from a recognized university in an appropriate discipline with an average of A– or higher. Applicants apply online and should arrange for electronic submission of the following material:

    • A one-page statement of purpose, outlining the applicant's areas of interest (in English).

    • A sample of written work in Spanish (10 to 12 pages).

    • Two letters of recommendation, ideally in English (one of the letters must comment on the applicant's fluency in Spanish).

    • A curriculum vitae in English.

Program Requirements

  • PhD students specialize in one of two fields:

    • Hispanic Linguistics.

    • Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs). Course selection is proposed to the Graduate Coordinator, who reviews and approves the plan. It is expected that students will complete the required coursework in Year 1. However, with the approval of the Graduate Coordinator, up to 1.0 FCE may be taken in Year 2. Each field has distribution requirements. Students must maintain a minimum average of A– in order to remain in good academic standing.

  • By March 25 of Year 1, each student must seek approval from the Graduate Advisory Committee for the proposed area of his/her dissertation and the membership of the Field Examination Committee (normally the proposed dissertation supervisor and two other members of the graduate faculty). The Graduate Advisory Committee will respond in writing by May 1 of the same year. The final decision in this matter rests with the Graduate Advisory Committee. In consultation with their committee, students must start their preparation for their field exams in the Summer session of Year 1.

  • The field examination centres on two subfields: the subfield of the student's proposed dissertation research and a subfield relevant to the student's research and general preparation.

  • By October 1 of Year 2, each student must submit to the Graduate Coordinator a brief statement (three to four pages double spaced) concerning the primary and secondary subfields for their field examination and two reading lists (one for each subfield). Each reading list should consist of 25 to 30 items and should include primary and secondary sources. The student's Field Committee will review this material and meet with the student to indicate revisions or additions to the reading lists. The student must file final copies of the two reading lists and statements, as approved by the committee, with the Graduate Coordinator by November 1.

  • The field examination will take place between January 15 and February 15 of Year 2. It has two parts: a written examination of six hours and an oral examination of two hours. Each part will cover the primary and secondary subfields that the student has prepared.

    • The written examination will consist of three questions. At least one of the questions must be answered in Spanish, and at least one of the questions must be answered in English.

    • The oral examination will follow two weeks after the written exam; it will normally be conducted in Spanish, although English may be used to accommodate committee members from cognate units. The Field Committee will grade the two parts of the examination together, on a credit/non-credit basis. A student who does not receive credit on the first attempt must retake both parts of the examination by May 10.

  • Each student must submit a written dissertation proposal to the Graduate Coordinator by April 25 of Year 2 of enrolment in the program. The written proposal articulates the topic, the research questions and methodology of the student's proposed research, and presents a sample of analysis, in approximately 25 pages double spaced. In addition, the proposal should include a bibliography, an outline of the dissertation, and a plan of action which associates the outline with activities of research and writing within a timeline for the three sessions per year. The proposal should be written in the language that the student intends to use in writing the dissertation (Spanish or English).

    • Each student must defend their dissertation proposal (including the outline and plan of action) in a two-hour, public oral examination to be held by May 15, normally conducted in the language of the student's proposal.

    • The student's Field Committee will grade the written proposal and the oral examination on a credit/non-credit basis. A student who does not receive credit on the first attempt must revise and resubmit the dissertation proposal by September 15 of Year 3 of enrolment and retake the oral examination on the proposal by October 15 of that year.

  • Language requirements must be fulfilled before registering for Year 4. Each student must demonstrate a reading knowledge of French and of a third non-English language relevant to their area of research. These language requirements may be satisfied by passing the appropriate reading knowledge courses or examinations offered by the corresponding departments of the Faculty of Arts and Science at the University of Toronto (including the exams offered in-house by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese).

    • Significant prior training in a language (such as an undergraduate major or minor) will also be accepted as demonstration of reading knowledge.

    • Native speakers of languages other than English and Spanish, who have received their formal education in that language (minimum of a high school diploma) may request an exemption for the third-language requirement.

  • Years 3 and 4 are devoted to researching and writing the doctoral dissertation. The Supervisory Committee must normally approve the complete draft of the dissertation before the candidate can proceed to the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Students fulfil the residence requirement by being registered as full-time on-campus and must reside in sufficient geographical proximity to enable them to fulfil the requirements of the program in a timely fashion. They are also expected to participate fully in departmental activities. While writing the dissertation, candidates are expected to be in residence, with the exception of absences for research purposes and approved leaves.

Program Length

4 years full-time

Time Limit

6 years full-time


Spanish: Spanish MA, PhD Courses

Most graduate courses are offered in a regular rotation. As a result, only a subset of the courses that appear in this calendar entry will be available in a given academic session. A list of offered courses is posted on the department's website.

SPA1053H
History of the Spanish Language
SPA1080H
Descriptive Grammar of Spanish
SPA1082H
Sociolinguistics of Spanish
SPA1083H
Microvariation in Spanish
SPA1084H Experimental Approaches to Hispanic Linguistics
SPA1088H
Spanish Syntax
SPA1089H
Spanish Morphosyntax
SPA1090H
Second Language Speech Learning
SPA1091H
Second Language Acquisition of Portuguese and Spanish
SPA1092H
Portuguese and Spanish Semantics
SPA1093H
Linguistics in Spanish
SPA1094H
Spanish Bilingualism
SPA1097H
Second-Language Teaching and Methodology
SPA1101H
Topics in the Acquisition of Spanish
SPA1104H
Experimental Approaches to Sound Variation and Change
SPA1105H
Spanish Intonation
SPA1150H
Directed Research in Hispanic Linguistics
SPA2016H
Medieval Spanish Narrative
SPA2018H
Poetics of Early Drama
SPA2052H
Graphic Legacy of Celestina: Visual Culture and Social Studies
SPA2060H
Literature and Society of Castile in the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance
SPA2121H
Psychoanalysis and the Passions in Early Modern Literature
SPA2150H
Defining Journeys in the Spanish Empire
SPA2152H
Cervantes' Don Quixote
SPA2160H
Transatlantic Hispanic Baroque
SPA2284H
Narrative and Political Transition in Spain
SPA2291H
The Urban Experience in Spain
SPA2292H
New Ruralism and Spain
SPA2304H
Latin American Cinema
SPA2305H
Auteurism in Spanish Cinema
SPA2352H
Modern Spanish Drama and its Traditions
SPA2404H
The Latin American Novel
SPA2406H Latin American Narratives of Resistance
SPA2411H Latin American Icons and the Sensory Work of Objects
SPA2412H Disease Stories: Race, and Fears of Contagion in Latin America
SPA2415H
Disability and Latin American Cultural Production
SPA2424H
Spanish American Poetry and Poetics
SPA2425H
21st Century Latin American Art and Culture
SPA2432H
Text and Image in Latin American Culture
SPA2802H
The Politics of Errantry in the Hispanic Caribbean
SPA2805H
Representations of Women in Latin American Culture
SPA2900H
Issues in Literary Theory and Hispanic Texts
SPA2905H
Latin American Cultural Theories
SPA2940H
Pursuing the Post-Revolution: Literature and Philosophy of Mexicanidad
SPA2947H
Transparency and Politics in Contemporary Mexican Literature
SPA3000H
Directed Research in Hispanic Literatures
SPA3300H Hispanic Literature and Linguistics Research Forum (Credit/No Credit)
JOS5019H
Cervantes and Renaissance Humanism
JOS5029H Reading Cervantes
JRL1101H Topics in Romance Laboratory Phonetics and Phonology I: Theory