English

English: Introduction

Faculty Affiliation

Arts and Science

Degree Programs

English

MA

  • Fields:
    • American Literature;
    • Aspects of Theory;
    • Canadian Literature;
    • Creative Writing;
    • Medieval Literature;
    • Renaissance Literature;
    • Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature;
    • Romantic and Victorian Literature;
    • Twentieth and Twenty-First Century British and Irish Literature;
    • World Literatures in English
 

PhD

  • Fields:
    • American Literature;
    • Aspects of Theory;
    • Canadian Literature;
    • Medieval Literature;
    • Renaissance Literature;
    • Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature;
    • Romantic and Victorian Literature;
    • Twentieth and Twenty-First Century British and Irish Literature;
    • World Literatures in English

Combined Degree Programs

STG, Law, JD / English, MA

Collaborative Specializations

The following collaborative specializations are available to students in participating degree programs as listed below:

Overview

One of the strongest and most diverse graduate English programs in North America, the University of Toronto's graduate program in the Department of English presents a wide array of approaches to the study of literature that includes both rigorous historical scholarship and the innovations of new theoretical, cultural, and interdisciplinary methods. This rich variety is exemplified in the more than 40 graduate seminars offered every year and in the interdisciplinary conjunctions with other departments and collaborative specializations.

Contact and Address

Web: www.english.utoronto.ca
Email: deptofenglish.graduate@utoronto.ca
Telephone: (416) 978-2526
Fax: (416) 978-2836

Department of English
University of Toronto
Jackman Humanities Building
6th Floor, 170 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario M5R 2M8
Canada

English: Graduate Faculty

Full Members

Ackerman, Alan - BA, MA, PhD
Akbari, Suzanne - BA, MA, MPH, PhD
Bewell, Alan - BA, MA, PhD
Blake, Liza - BA, MPH, MA, PhD
Bolus-Reichert, Christine - BPhil, AM, PhD
Boyagoda, Randy - PhD
Charise, Andrea - BSc, MA, PhD
Clarke, George Elliott - BA, MA, PhD
Cobb, Michael - BA, MA, AM, PhD
Cruz, Denise - BA, MA, PhD
Dancer, Thom - MA, PhD
Dickie, Simon - BA, MA, PhD
Dolan, Neal - BA, PhD
Downes, Paul - BA, PhD
Dubois, Andrew - BA, PhD
Esonwanne, Uzoma - BA, MA, PhD
Esterhammer, Angela - BA, PhD
Gallagher-Ross, Jacob - BA, MFA, DFA
Gaston, Kara Susan - BA, MPH, PhD
Gillespie, Alexandra - BA, BSc, PhD
Gniadek, Melissa - AB, MA, MA, PhD
Goldman, Marlene Beth - BFA, MA, PhD
Greene, Richard - PhD
Hammond, Adam - BA, MA, PhD
Harvey, Elizabeth - PhD
Hernandez, Alex - AB, AM, MA, PhD
Hill, Colin - BA, MA, PhD
Jaffe, Audrey - BA, PhD
Kamboureli, Smaro - BA, MA, PhD
Keymer, Thomas - BA, MA, PhD
Kortenaar, Neil ten - BA, MA, PhD
Lamb, Susan - BA, AM, DA
Larson, Katie - BMus, AB, MPH, PhD
Leonard, Garry - BA, MA, PhD
Levene, Mark - BA, MA, PhD
Li, Hao - BA, PhD
Lopez, Jeremy - BA, MA, DPhil
Magnusson, Lynne - BA, MA, PhD
Maurice, Alice - BA, DPhil
McGill, Robert - BA, MPH, MA, PhD
Morgenstern, Naomi - BA, MA, PhD (Chair and Graduate Chair)
Most, Andrea - BA, MA, PhD
Mount, Nick - AM, PhD
Murray, Heather - BA, MA, PhD
Nyquist, Mary - BA, MA, PhD
Percy, Carol - BA, MA, DPhil
Quayson, Ato - BA, PhD
Radovic, Stanka - PhD
Robins, William - BA, MPH, PhD
Robinson, Terry - BA, MA, PhD
Rogers, John - BA, MA, PhD
Rubright, Marjorie - AB, MA, DLitt
Ruti, Mari - BA, MA, PhD
Salih, Sara - BA, DPhil
Schmitt, Cannon - BA, MA, PhD
Seitler, Dana - BA, MA, PhD
Sergi, Matthew - BFA, PhD
Stern, Simon - BA, PhD, JD, Chair in Electronic Commerce
Stevens, Paul - BA, MA, PhD
Suzack, Cheryl - BA, BE, MA, PhD
Switzky, Lawrence - BA, MA, PhD
Syme, Holger Schott - BA, AM, PhD
Vernon, Karina Joan - BA, MA, PhD
Warley, Christopher - BA, MA, DPhil
Weisman, Karen - BA, PhD
White, Dan - BA, AM, DPhil (Director of Graduate Studies)
Williams, Ian - BA, MA, PhD
Woodland, Malcolm - BA, MA, PhD
Wright, Daniel - BA, MA, PhD
Xie, Ming - BA, PhD

Members Emeriti

Adamowski, Thomas - PhD
Asals, Frederick - AB, MA, PhD
Auster, Henry - BA, MA, PhD
Cameron, Elspeth - BA, MA, PhD
Chambers, Douglas - PhD
Cook, Eleanor - PhD
Corman, Brian - AB, AM, PhD
Cuddy-Keane, Melba - BA, MA, PhD
Domville, Eric William - BA, PhD
Duffy, Dennis - AB, MA, PhD
Dutka, JoAnna - BA, MA, PhD, ARCT
Galbraith, David - MA, PhD
Halewood, William - AB, MA, PhD
Hayne, Barrie - BA, AM, PhD
Healey, Antonette - BA, MA, PhD
Henderson, Greig - BA, MA, PhD
Johnston, Alexandra - PhD
Klausner, David - AB, PhD
Leggatt, Alexander - BA, MA, PhD
Matus, Jill - BA, MA, PhD
Millgate, Michael - BA, MA, PhD
Saddlemyer, Ann - PhD, DLitt
Sidnell, Michael - BA, MA, PhD
Townsend, David Robert - BA, MA, PhD
Vicari, E. Patricia - BA, MA, PhD
Visser, Colin - BA, BLitt, PhD
Warkentin, Germaine - PhD

Associate Members

Aguila-Way, Tania - BA, MA, PhD
Baker, Deirdre - BA, MA, PhD
Battershill, Claire - PhD
Blayney, Peter - BA, PhD
Chakravarty, Urvashi - BA, PhD
Dooley, Ann - BA, MA, PhD
Mehta, Rijuta - BA, MA, MA, PhD
Newman, Daniel - DLitt
Thomas, Anna - BA, MA
Tysdal, Daniel - BA, MA
Walton, Audrey - PhD

English: English MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

The Master of Arts program offers broad coverage in British, Canadian, Aboriginal, American, and postcolonial literatures, a sophisticated command of current theoretical approaches, and exceptional preparation and intellectual support for significant research.

The MA in English degree program is offered in 10 fields: 9 fields have the same requirements, while the field of Creative Writing has different requirements.

The MA program can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis except in the Creative Writing field, which is taken on a full-time basis only. Requirements for the Creative Writing field are described in a separate section below.

 

Fields:
1) American Literature; 2) Aspects of Theory; 3) Canadian Literature; 4) Medieval Literature; 5) Renaissance Literature; 6) Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature; 7) Romantic and Victorian Literature; 8) Twentieth and Twenty-First Century British and Irish Literature; 9) World Literatures in English

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of English's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A minimum of 7 full-year undergraduate courses in English or the equivalent in half-year courses (i.e., 14), or any combination of full- and half-year courses that add up to the equivalent of 7 full-year courses.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree (i.e., a four-year undergraduate degree), or its equivalent (preferably in English), with a minimum grade point average (GPA) of B+ or better and evidence of first-class work in English. The department favours a broad training in the major genres and all periods of English literary history.

  • Recommendations from two referees.

  • A statement of purpose.

  • A writing sample consisting of 12 to 15 pages. The writing sample should be an accomplished piece of the applicant's own academic writing, such as an advanced undergraduate seminar paper. See details about the writing sample.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English are required to write the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores required are:

    • 600 on the paper-based test and 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE)

    • 100/120 on the Internet-based test, with at least 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • Admissions are selective; possession of minimum qualifications does not guarantee admission.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • ENG6999Y Critical Topographies: Theory and Practice of Contemporary Literary Studies in English (1.0 FCE)

    • 3.0 approved graduate FCEs in English.

  • Students must attain a B standing in each graduate course.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S);
9 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

 

Field: Creative Writing

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of English's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A minimum of 7 full-year undergraduate courses in English or the equivalent in half-year courses (i.e., 14), or any combination of full- and half-year courses that add up to the equivalent of 7 full-year courses.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree (i.e., a four-year undergraduate degree), or its equivalent (preferably in English), with a minimum grade point average (GPA) of B+ or better and evidence of first-class work in English. The department favours a broad training in the major genres and all periods of English literary history.

  • Recommendations from two referees.

  • A statement of purpose.

  • A writing sample consisting of 12 to 15 pages. The writing sample should be an accomplished piece of the applicant's own academic writing, such as an advanced undergraduate seminar paper. See details about the writing sample.

  • A portfolio consisting of 20 to 25 pages of prose (drama, fiction, or creative non-fiction), and/or poetry. See details about the format of creative writing portfolio submissions.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English are required to write the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores required are:

    • 600 on the paper-based test and 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE)

    • 100/120 on the Internet-based test, with at least 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • Admissions are selective; possession of minimum qualifications does not guarantee admission.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • ENG6950Y Workshop in Creative Writing (1.0 FCE). All students must complete the Workshop in Creative Writing in Year 1 of their program.

    • 2.0 approved FCEs in English.

  • Students must attain a B standing in each graduate course.

  • Supervised Writing Project (the equivalent of a thesis). Upon completion of coursework, students undertake a book-length Writing Project in a genre of their choice: poetry, drama, fiction, or creative non-fiction. Each student is assigned a faculty member or adjunct faculty member with whom to consult on a regular basis about the project. All advisors are published writers.

  • The MA Creative Writing program cannot be taken on a part-time basis.

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

English: English PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The Doctor of Philosophy program offers broad coverage in British, Canadian, Aboriginal, American, and postcolonial literatures, a sophisticated command of current theoretical approaches, and exceptional support for significant research projects.

Applicants are admitted through one of two routes: 1) a master’s degree in English, 2) in exceptional cases, an appropriate bachelor’s degree (direct entry).

Completion of the PhD program may take longer than the indicated program length below.

 

Fields:
1) American Literature; 2) Aspects of Theory; 3) Canadian Literature; 4) Medieval Literature; 5) Renaissance Literature; 6) Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature; 7) Romantic and Victorian Literature; 8) Twentieth and Twenty-First Century British and Irish Literature; 9) World Literatures in English

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of English's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Normally, applicants have a master's degree in English from a recognized university, with an average grade equivalent to at least a University of Toronto A– in the applicant's overall program.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they are capable of independent research in English at an advanced level.

  • Recommendations from two referees.

  • A writing sample of not more than 5,000 words (approximately 15 to 20 pages).

  • A statement of purpose.

  • A curriculum vitae (CV).

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English are required to write the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores required are:

    • 600 on the paper-based test and 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE)

    • 100/120 on the Internet-based test, with at least 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • Admission to the PhD is based on the applicant's undergraduate and graduate records and upon the evidence of the references and statement.

  • Admissions are selective; possession of minimum qualifications does not guarantee admission.

Program Requirements

  • Students pursue a program of study and research approved by the department.
Courses
  • The minimum course requirements for the degree are as follows.

    • ENG8000H Texts, Theories, and Archives (0.5 FCE) unless this or an equivalent course has already been taken

    • ENG9500H Professional Development (0.5 FCE)

    • ENG9900H Professing Literature (0.5 FCE)

    • 3.0 additional FCEs in English, as approved by the department.

  • Every student must select at least 2.0 FCEs outside the chosen field of study in the course of their graduate training. The student is encouraged to combine these courses into a minor field. Graduate courses taken as part of the master's program and in fulfillment of the English language requirement may be counted in this connection, but not ENG6999Y Critical Topographies: Theory and Practice of Contemporary Literary Studies in English nor courses in the 9000 series.

  • Course selection must meet the approval of the department.

English-Language Requirement
  • Demonstrated knowledge of the history and development of the English language, especially of its early period.

  • Any student who has not completed ENG240Y or an equivalent full-year undergraduate course in Old English with at least a B standing is required to take one of the following courses in the English language:

    • ENG1001H Old English I

    • ENG6361H History and Structure of the English Language I

    • ENG6362H History and Structure of the English Language: Post-1500

    • ENG6365H Diasporic Englishes.

  • Alternatively, the requirement can be satisfied by taking a special examination in Old English.
Language Requirement
  • Demonstrated reading knowledge of French by May 31 of Year 3 of registration.

  • With the permission of the department, another language (other than English) may be substituted for French provided that this other language is required by the student's research area.

  • The supervisory committee may require the student to qualify in other program-related languages as well.

Special Fields Examination
  • Students are required to pass a Special Fields Examination. The examination has three components:

    • a written examination, based on a reading list drawn up in consultation with the supervisory committee;

    • a short position paper, in which the student articulates the argument and stakes of the proposed thesis in light of the preparation for this written examination;

    • and an oral examination that engages in part with the written examination and in part with the position paper.

  • Students who enter the PhD program with a master's degree generally take the Special Fields Examination no later than the end of the second session of Year 2. A second attempt of the Special Fields Examination is allowed on the recommendation of the student's committee.

  • The student must have completed all requirements for the degree, exclusive of thesis research, by the end of Year 3 in order to remain in good standing in the program.

Thesis
  • A candidate is required to submit a thesis on an approved subject embodying the results of original investigation which constitute a significant contribution to the knowledge of the field, and to pass an oral examination on the subject of the thesis. The normal length of a PhD thesis is approximately 75,000 words. The maximum length accepted by the department is 100,000 words.

  • No later than May 15 of Year 1 of registration, the student must submit to the Associate Director, PhD, a preliminary thesis proposal, approved by the prospective supervisor. The Associate Director, PhD, appoints a supervisory committee that includes a supervisor and two other faculty members with expertise in the proposed research area. The student is required to meet with the supervisory committee within three months of submitting the preliminary proposal. An approved thesis proposal signed by all members of the supervisory committee and by the Associate Director, PhD, must be submitted by October 1 of Year 2 of registration.

  • The student and the supervisor should meet regularly. The student is also required to meet at least once a year with the supervisory committee. The supervisory committee should normally approve the completed thesis before it is submitted for examination.

  • The Doctoral Final Oral Examination is arranged by the department in collaboration with the School of Graduate Studies. The candidate should allow at least 10 weeks from submission of the thesis for the department to complete the arrangements for the oral examination.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of English's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • In exceptional cases, applicants with an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university that includes at least 8.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) in English, with an average grade equivalent to at least a University of Toronto A– in the applicant's overall program may be considered for admission (direct entry).

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they are capable of independent research in English at an advanced level.

  • Recommendations from two referees.

  • A writing sample of not more than 5,000 words (approximately 15 to 20 pages).

  • A statement of purpose.

  • A curriculum vitae (CV).

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English are required to write the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores required are:

    • 600 on the paper-based test and 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE)

    • 100/120 on the Internet-based test, with at least 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • Admission to the PhD is based on the applicant's undergraduate records and upon the evidence of the references and statement.

  • Admissions are selective; possession of minimum qualifications does not guarantee admission.

Program Requirements

  • Students pursue a program of study and research approved by the department.
Courses
  • The minimum course requirements for the degree are as follows. Students admitted directly from a bachelor's degree must take a total of 7.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • ENG6999Y Critical Topographies: Theory and Practice of Contemporary Literary Studies in English (1.0 FCE)

    • ENG8000H Texts, Theories, and Archives (0.5 FCE)

    • ENG9500H Professional Development (0.5 FCE)

    • ENG9900H Professing Literature (0.5 FCE)

    • 5.0 additional FCEs in English, as approved by the department. The student must complete ENG6999Y plus 2.0 FCEs in Year 1 of the program, with an average grade of at least an A–. Students must complete all remaining courses, except for ENG9500H Professional Development, by the end of Year 3 of the program, with an average of at least an A– in order to maintain good academic standing and to continue in the PhD program. In order to maintain good academic standing, and to continue in the PhD program, the student must complete each course with a grade of at least B.

    • select at least 2.0 FCEs outside the chosen field of study. The student is encouraged to combine these courses in a minor field.

  • Course selection must meet the approval of the department.

English-Language Requirement
  • Demonstrated knowledge of the history and development of the English language, especially of its early period.

  • Any student who has not completed ENG240Y or an equivalent full-year undergraduate course in Old English with at least a B standing, is required to take one of the following courses in the English language:

    • ENG1001H Old English I

    • ENG6361H History and Structure of the English Language I

    • ENG6362H History and Structure of the English Language: Post-1500

    • ENG6365H Diasporic Englishes.

  • Alternatively, the requirement can be satisfied by taking a special examination in Old English.

Language Requirement
  • Demonstrated reading knowledge of French by May 31 of Year 4 of registration.

  • With the permission of the department, another language (other than English) may be substituted for French provided that this other language is required by the student's research area.

  • The supervisory committee may require the student to qualify in other program-related languages as well.

Special Fields Examination
  • Students are required to pass a Special Fields Examination. The examination has three components:

    • a written examination, based on a reading list drawn up in consultation with the supervisory committee;

    • a short position paper, in which the student articulates the argument and stakes of the proposed thesis in light of the preparation for this written examination;

    • and an oral examination that engages in part with the written examination and in part with the position paper.

  • Direct-entry students generally take the Special Fields Examination no later than the end of the second session of Year 3. A second attempt of the Special Fields Examination is allowed on the recommendation of the student's committee.

  • The student must have completed all requirements for the degree, exclusive of thesis research, by the end of Year 4 in order to remain in good standing in the program.

Thesis
  • A candidate is required to submit a thesis on an approved subject embodying the results of original investigation which constitute a significant contribution to the knowledge of the field, and to pass an oral examination on the subject of the thesis. The normal length of a PhD thesis is approximately 75,000 words. The maximum length accepted by the department is 100,000 words.

  • No later than May 15 of Year 2 of registration, the student must submit to the Associate Director, PhD, a preliminary thesis proposal, approved by the prospective supervisor. The Associate Director, PhD, appoints a supervisory committee that includes a supervisor and two other faculty members with expertise in the proposed research area. The student is required to meet with the supervisory committee within three months of submitting the preliminary proposal. An approved thesis proposal signed by all members of the supervisory committee and by the Associate Director, PhD, must be submitted by October 1 of Year 3 of registration.

  • The student and the supervisor should meet regularly. The student is also required to meet at least once a year with the supervisory committee. The supervisory committee should normally approve the completed thesis before it is submitted for examination.

  • The Doctoral Final Oral Examination is arranged by the department in collaboration with the School of Graduate Studies. The candidate should allow at least 10 weeks from submission of the thesis for the department to complete the arrangements for the oral examination.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

English: English MA, PhD Courses

The following list of possible courses is subject to revision; further information, including course descriptions and timetables, are posted on the Department of English website and may be obtained from the department before enrolment. Courses offered by the department vary considerably from year to year. Students in English are eligible to take courses in other graduate units (for example, Comparative Literature, Medieval Studies, Drama, Information, South Asian Studies, Women's Studies). From time to time, the department also offers programs of directed reading in special fields. These reading courses are normally available only to students in the PhD program. With the special approval of the Director of Graduate Studies, PhD students may substitute one such course for one (and not more than one) of the required courses.

Course Code Course Title
ENG1001H
Old English I
ENG1002H
Introduction to Old English II: Beowulf
ENG1007H Medieval Drama: Morality Plays
ENG1009H
Writing the Nation: Pre-modern Historiographies
ENG1011H
Economies of Medieval Drama: East Anglia, Kent, Sussex
ENG1025H
Globalization and the Religious Other in Medieval Literature
ENG1027H
Constructions of the Other in Medieval Literature
ENG1333H
Reception of the Classics in Middle English Literature
ENG1551H
The Canterbury Tales
ENG1552H
Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and Other Works
ENG2012H Life-Writing in Early Modern England
ENG2016H The Queer Renaissance: Queer Studies, Early Modern Texts
ENG2017H Early Modern Asexualities
ENG2018H A Royal Society of Their Own: Early Modern Lit/Sci/Phil
ENG2019H
Early Modern Psyches: Shakespeare and Psychoanalysis
ENG2022H Early Modern Critical Race Studies
ENG2050H John Donne's Poetic Inhabitations
ENG2054H
John Donne: Theory and Context
ENG2226H
Early Modern Manuscripts
ENG2230H
Discourses of Colonialism and Early Modern Literature
ENG2282H
Ben Jonson
ENG2288H
Renaissance Keywords
ENG2464H Early Modern Literature and the Crisis of Representation
ENG2470H
Milton, Globalism, and the Post-national
ENG2472H Milton
ENG2484H Thomas Heywood and the Early Modern Theater
ENG2505H
Shakespeare's Sonnets: Texts and Contexts
ENG2506H Shakespeare’s Theatrical (After) Lives
ENG2533H
Shakespeare's Language
ENG2535H
Shakespeare and his Contemporaries
ENG3041H Acting Theory and Practice Before Stanislavsky
ENG3066H
Literatures of British Enlightenment
ENG3070H
Laurence Sterne
ENG3073H
Richardson's Clarissa: Fiction, Contexts, and Criticism
ENG3251H
Varieties of (18th-Century) Religious Experience
ENG3252H
The Postsecular Eighteenth Century
ENG3254H
Fielding and Hogarth
ENG3301H
The Social Life of Feeling in Eighteenth-Century Literature
ENG3302H Being There: Liveness and Presence ca. 1750–1830
ENG3337H Comedy and Sentimentality in Eighteenth-Century Literature
ENG3338H Satire and the Great Laughter Debate
ENG3900H
The Circum-Atlantic Novel: Utopia to Mansfield Park
ENG4154H Wordsworth: Poetry, Context, and Interpretation
ENG4170H
Extravagant Styles: Romanticism, Orientalism, and the Gothic
ENG4211H Romanticism and Translation
ENG4212H
Romanticism and Catastrophe
ENG4222H
Romanticism and Mobility
ENG4224H
Early Nineteenth-Century Environmental Literature
ENG4235H
Keats: The Poet and His World
ENG4404H Victorian Memory/Victorian Forgetting
ENG4501H
Victorian Fiction and the Fragility of the Social
ENG4502H
Decadent / Pastoral / Fin-de-Siècle
ENG4504H
Darwin and Literature
ENG4622H
Brontë and Dickens
ENG4626H
Literature, Politics, Revolution: Morris and Kingsnorth
ENG4662H
Romantic Memory
ENG4664H
Romantic Pastoral Revisited
ENG4722H Reparative Readings of Victorian Fiction
ENG4770H
Aesthetics and Ethics: the Late Victorians
ENG4756H
Class and the Victorian Novel
ENG4801H
Aging and Older Age in the Nineteenth-Century British Novel
ENG4808H
Public Health Stories: Writing Illness in 19th-Century Britain
ENG4856H
Character in 19th-Century Fiction
ENG4884H
Everyday Life and 19th-Century Novelistic Representation
ENG4903H Herman Melville’s Democratic Navigations
ENG4904H Slavery and Anti-Slavery in the Ante-Bellum United States
ENG4973H
Marx and the American Renaissance
ENG4987H
Novelties of the Sublime in Modern Poetry
ENG5005H
Modern Poetry and Philosophy
ENG5006H
Modernism and the Politics of Form
ENG5020H
#BlackLivesMatter: Contemporary Black Canadian Literature
ENG5021H Black Forms: Critical Race Theory and Diasporic Literature
ENG5022H
Race, Psychoanalysis, and American Literature
ENG5025H Malcolm X and African-Canadian Literature
ENG5030H
The Child at the Social Limit in Contemporary US Fiction
ENG5042H Justice and Form in Contemporary Canadian Ecopoetry
ENG5046H
Settler Colonialism and US Literary Studies
ENG5047H Class, Culture, and American Realism
ENG5049H
Liberalism, Community, and American Literature
ENG5051H
Energy and Economy in the American Renaissance
ENG5052H
Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Industrial Revolution
ENG5056H Studies in the 21st-C. Novel: Zadie Smith and David Mitchell
ENG5062H
The Rise of the Transnational American Novel
ENG5064H
Duplicators: The DIY Ethic and DIY Aesthetics in C20-21 Lit
ENG5066H
Realism in the Time of the Anthropocene
ENG5074H In the First Person: Memoirs and Mediality
ENG5075H
Aesthetics of Struggle: Revolution, Fugitivity, Survival
ENG5130H
Oceanic Modernisms: The Sea and Modernist British Literature
ENG5141H
Staging Environmental Crisis in 21st-Century Canadian Lit
ENG5253H
Simply Divine! The Novels of Evelyn Waugh and Graham Greene
ENG5254H
E. M. Forster and His Legacies
ENG5279H
Class and Community in Postwar American Literature
ENG5281H
Whitman and Nationalism 1855-1891/2
ENG5283H Canadian Animal Stories: Ethics and Aesthetics
ENG5288H
American Literature: Temporality Studies
ENG5300H
Avant-Garde Aesthetics and Politics in Contemporary Poetry
ENG5313H
Poets and Playwrights: Eliot, Stein, Auden
ENG5317H
Amorous Americans: Sexuality and the United States Novel
ENG5464H
Archipelagic American Studies
ENG5524H
Modernism, Modernity, and the Crisis in Temporality
ENG5526H
Monuments of Modernism
ENG5527H Making and Re-Making Modernism
ENG5555H
Archived Toronto: Literary and Cultural Tracings
ENG5580H
American Pastoral
ENG5717H
The CanLit Boom of the 1960s
ENG5718H The Books of Coach House Press
ENG5731H
Transitional Justice and Indigenous Writing in Canada
ENG5732H Visual Sovereignty and the Politics of Reconciliation
ENG5784H
Modernizing Poetry
ENG5799H
Settler-Colonialism and American Indian Writing
ENG5801H
Kinship in Indigenous Asian Canadian Literatures
ENG5854H
The Global South
ENG5874H Late James
ENG5905H
Introduction to African-Canadian Literature
ENG5906H Black Pulp Fiction (& Non-Fiction)
ENG5963H
James Joyce: Modernism, Modernity, Mythology
ENG5988H
Posthuman Encounters in Contemporary Canadian Literature
ENG5991H
Postcolonial Tragedies: Theory, Literature, Criticism
ENG5994H Modern South Asia in Literature and Media
ENG6010H
Bad Feelings: Between Affect Theory and Psychoanalysis
ENG6011H
Love and Desire in a Time of Crisis
ENG6012H
Forms of Disability
ENG6014H Adapting Short Fiction
ENG6015H Experimental Narrative and/as Narrative Theory
ENG6034H
Old and New Materialisms
ENG6038H Authors and Their Institutions
ENG6044H
The Literature of Protection
ENG6049H
Intersections/Interventions: Diaspora Studies Today
ENG6054H
Construals of the Self: Autobiography in Africa and the Diaspora
ENG6063H
Novel Theory Now
ENG6064H The Theory of the Novel
ENG6065H
Repetition in Modern Thought and Culture
ENG6066H
Style: Authorial Signature in the Age of Cyber Technology
ENG6068H
Restaging Shame
ENG6100H
Reading Walter Benjamin
ENG6159H
Poststructuralist Poetics
ENG6162H
The Poetics of Melancholy
ENG6171H
Writing a Journal Article
ENG6181H
Permaculture and Literature
ENG6182H Eating Well
ENG6188H Land, Myth, and Translation in a Time of Crisis
ENG6199H
Collectivity
ENG6362H
History and Structure of the English Language: Post-1500
ENG6365H
Diasporic Englishes
ENG6490H
The Postcritical Turn
ENG6494H
Psychogeography and the Mapping of Literary Space
ENG6498H
Dystopian Fiction and Unsettled Space
ENG6501H
Life, Death, and American Fiction
ENG6510H
Creative Nonfiction
ENG6517H
Walter Benjamin and His Contemporaries
ENG6519H Postcolonial Theory and the World Literature Debates
ENG6521H
Literature and Medicine: Corpus, Theory, Praxis
ENG6526H
Postcolonial Poetry
ENG6529H
Critical Animal Studies
ENG6533H
The Art of Mourning
ENG6540H
The Victorian Novel, Literally
ENG6544H Queer, Trans, and Feminist Historiographies
ENG6552H
Law and Literature
ENG6553H
Law as Literature: Story and Style in a Culture of Argument
ENG6815H Artificial Persons
ENG6818H
Social Robots in the Cultural Imagination
ENG6820H The Novel of Sexual Ideas
ENG6847H
From CanLit to Canlits: The Re-formation of a Literature
ENG6890H
Reading Auerbach's Mimesis
ENG6950Y
Workshop in Creative Writing
ENG6999Y
Critical Topographies: Theory and Practice of Contemporary Literary Studies in English
ENG8000H
Texts, Theories, and Archives
ENG9500H
Professional Development
ENG9900H
Professing Literature
JLE5116H
Naming the World: Realism Travels the Globe
JLE5220H Tricksters and Confidence Men
JLE5225H
The Passage from History to Fiction