French Language and Literature

French Language and Literature: Introduction

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Faculty Affiliation

Arts and Science

Degree Programs​

French Language and Literature

MA and PhD

  • Fields:
    • French Linguistics
    • French Literature

Collaborative Specializations

The following collaborative specializations are available to students in participating degree programs as listed below:

Overview

The Department of French has a rich history dating back to 1853. Since 1925, when the first PhD was granted, the department has remained one of the most reputed departments of its kind in Canada. Many PhD graduates are professors of French in Canadian and foreign universities. Since 1980, the department has graduated more than 200 PhDs.

Graduate students benefit from a number of exceptional resources, including the outstanding collections at the Robarts Library (containing more than 500,000 volumes in French) and the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. The department participates in several collaborative specializations and has strong connections with other academic units.

Home to several research groups and projects, the department offers students vital and stimulating collaborative opportunities for research. The department also publishes its own peer-reviewed journal, Arborescences, with graduate student support. Graduate students are welcome to participate in many faculty-led research groups.

The department hosts lectures presented by renowned scholars, giving students a chance to network with specialists in their field. Contemporary writers from France and Québec are frequently invited to read from their works.

Department professors with literary studies expertise specialize in every period of French literature, Québec and francophone literature, and all the major types of literary theory and methodology. In linguistics, particular strengths include first and second language acquisition, languages in contact including creole studies, and formal linguistics. Several linguistics professors have strong links and collaborative research projects with Romance and Hispanic linguists and the Department of Linguistics at U of T.

Graduate students organize Friday workshops, a forum for sharing their work in progress, as well as an annual graduate conference. Linguistics students enjoy access to a top-notch Linguistics Laboratory that is equipped with technology for data analysis, for conducting psycholinguistic experiments, a space for meeting and testing subjects, and a French Linguistics library.

The MA program provides advanced academic development in either literature or linguistics, as well as outstanding training in research and communication skills in French, preparing students for doctoral studies and careers in such fields as teaching, government administration, and communications. PhD students receive rigorous research training in either literature or linguistics, culminating in original research for their doctoral thesis. While primarily training students for academic careers at the university or community college levels, the PhD in French can also lead to employment opportunities in editorial work and professions outside academia.

Contact and Address

Web: www.french.utoronto.ca
Email: french.gradcounsellor@utoronto.ca
Telephone: (416) 926-2307
Fax: (416) 926-2328

Department of French Language and Literature
University of Toronto
50 St. Joseph Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1J4
Canada

French Language and Literature: Graduate Faculty

Full Members

Brousseau, Anne-Marie - PhD (Interim Chair and Graduate Chair)
Cahill, James - AB, MA, MA, PhD
Drouin, Sebastien - BA, MA, PhD
Elkabas, Charles - BA, MA, PhD
Havercroft, Barbara - BA, MA, PhD
Holtz, Gregoire - LèsL, MA, DLitt
Kullmann, Dorothea - PhD
Le Huenen, Roland - DèsL, DLitt
LeBlanc, Julie - BA, PhD
Michelucci, Pascal - BA, MA, PhD
Motsch, Andreas - PhD
Ndayiragije, Juvenal - PhD
Nikiema, Emmanuel - PhD
Paterson, Janet - BA, MA, PhD
Pirvulescu, Mihaela - MA, PhD (Associate Chair, Graduate; Coordinator, Graduate Admissions and Funding)
Riendeau, Pascal - BA, MA, PhD
Roberge, Yves - BA, MA, PhD
Steele, Jeffrey - BA, MA, PhD
Tcheuyap, Alexie - BA, MA, PhD
Theriault, Patrick - BA, MA, PhD
Thomine, Marie Claire - PhD

Members Emeriti

Bertrand-Jennings, Chantal - LèsL, PhD
Bhatt, Parth - BA, MA, PhD
Boursier, Nicole - BLitt, DèsL, PhD
Cozea, Angela - BA, MA, PhD
De Kerckhove, Derrick - BA, MA, PhD
Falconer, A. Graham - MA, DDeL'UN
Fitch, Brian - BA, PhD
Fitting, Peter - BA, PhD
Fleming, John - BA, MA, PhD
Grise, Catherine - BA, MA, PhD
Kerslake, Lawrence - PhD
Kushner, Eva - BA, MPH, PhD
Lehouck, Emile - BA, DèsL
Lord, Michel - BA, MA, PhD
McClelland, John Alan - PhD
Nesselroth, Peter - BA, MA, PhD
O'Neill-Karch, Mariel - BA, MA
Perron, Paul - PhD
Smith, David - BA, PhD, PhD
Smyth, Ronald - BA, MSc, PhD
Taylor, Robert - PhD
Tolton, Cameron - PhD
Wooldridge, Terence - BA, DDeL'UN

Associate Members

Cobb, Michael - BA, MA, AM, PhD
Colantoni, Laura - MA, PhD
Cuervo, M. Cristina - PhD
Danesi, Marcel - BA, MA, PhD
Friesner, Michael - BA, MA, PhD
Hamlaoui, Fatima - PhD
Jennings, Eric - BA, MA, PhD
Kastronic, Laura - BA, MA, PhD
Kirouac Massicotte, Isabelle - BA, MA, PhD
Kortenaar, Neil ten - BA, MA, PhD
Liakin, Denis - BA, MA, PhD
Massam, Diane - BA, MA, PhD
Papillon, Joelle - PhD
Perez-Leroux, Ana Teresa - MA, PhD
Peterson, Jordan - BA, BA, PhD
Rannaud, Adrien - LèsL, MA, PhD
Sarabia, Rosa - BA, PhD
Spada, Nina - BA, MA, PhD

French Language and Literature: French Language and Literature MA

Master of Arts​

Program Description

The Master of Arts program is both a self-contained program and the first stage towards doctoral studies. It has two objectives:

  • to allow the student to develop a thorough knowledge of the discipline through a program of coursework in French literary studies or linguistics and

  • to develop an aptitude for research.

It is a 12-month program for full-time students; the program is available on a part-time basis.

At the beginning of their course of study, students meet individually with the Associate Chair, Graduate in order to determine course selection with a view to ensuring that the student has a well-rounded program and, considered in conjunction with the undergraduate degree, has a broad knowledge of the discipline.

 

Field: French Linguistics

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of French Language and Literature's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • B+ average standing or better, with at least B+ in French. A B+ average does not automatically lead to admission.

  • Competence in French.

  • Concentration in French linguistics, with a minimum of seven full courses, or equivalent, in French. A minimum of five of the seven full courses, or equivalent, should be in the proposed area of study (i.e., linguistics). Applicants may request that up to 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) of the 5.0 FCEs in the discipline come from cognate disciplines upon the department’s approval.

  • Admission is based upon the evidence of the supporting letters and the applicant's academic record.

Program Requirements

  • Prerequisite work, if necessary.

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • FRE 1103H Séminaire de linguistique I : Phonétique et phonologie (0.5 FCE);

    • FRE 1104H Séminaire de linguistique II : Syntaxe (0.5 FCE);

    • FRE 1141H Séminaire de linguistique III : Linguistique expérimentale et linguistique de corpus (0.5 FCE);

      • ​​​2.5 FCEs from the regular graduate offerings; or

      • 2.0 FCEs and FRE 5001H Research Essay (0.5 FCE), a memoire of approximately 35 pages; or

      • 1.5 FCEs and FRE 5000Y Research Essay (1.0 FCE), a 65- to 75-page memoire.

  • Students must maintain a B average in order to be recommended for the degree and must obtain a minimum of mid-B in the Research Essay if taken. Students must also obtain a minimum of mid-B for the graduate seminars in linguistics (FRE 1103H, FRE 1104H, and FRE 1141H).

  • Up to 1.0 FCE may be taken outside the department, with the permission of the Associate Chair, Graduate.

  • Normally, part-time students take the graduate seminars in linguistics during Year 1.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S);
6 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

 

Field: French Literature

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of French Language and Literature's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • B+ average standing or better, with at least B+ in French. A B+ average does not automatically lead to admission.

  • Competence in French.

  • Concentration in French literature, with a minimum of seven full courses, or equivalent, in French. A minimum of five of the seven full courses, or equivalent, should be in the proposed area of study (i.e., literature). Applicants may request that up to 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) of the 5.0 FCEs in the discipline come from cognate disciplines upon the department’s approval.

  • Admission is based upon the evidence of the supporting letters and the applicant's academic record.

Program Requirements

  • Prerequisite work, if necessary.

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • ​​​FRE 1202H Séminaire de littérature 1 : théorie (0.5 FCE)

    • FRE 1203H Séminaire de littérature 2 : période (0.5 FCE)

    • FRE 1204H Séminaire de littérature 3 : genre (0.5 FCE)

      • ​​​2.5 FCEs from the regular graduate course offerings; or

      • 2.0 FCEs and FRE 5001H Research Essay (0.5 FCE), a memoire of approximately 35 pages; or

      • 1.5 FCEs and FRE 5000Y Research Essay (1.0 FCE), a 65- to 75-page memoire.

  • Students must maintain a B average in order to be recommended for the degree and must obtain a minimum of mid-B in the Research Essay if taken. Students must also obtain a minimum of mid-B for the graduate seminars in literature (FRE 1202H, FRE 1203H, and FRE 1204H).

  • Up to 1.0 FCE may be taken outside the department, with the permission of the Associate Chair, Graduate.

  • Normally, part-time students take the graduate seminars in literature during Year 1.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S);
6 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

French Language and Literature: French Language and Literature PhD; Field: French Linguistics

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The Doctor of Philosophy is necessary preparation for a career in higher education in Canada and abroad which will include teaching and research at an advanced academic level. The PhD includes a combination of advanced seminars, field examinations, a high amount of embedded professional experience in teaching and research, and the presentation of the results of a significant contribution to the discipline in the form of an original dissertation.

The PhD program engages students in a program of study and research in the field of French Linguistics approved by the department. At the beginning of their course of study, students meet individually with the Associate Chair, Graduate in order to determine course selection with a view to ensuring that the student has a well-rounded program and, considered in conjunction with the undergraduate degree, has a broad knowledge of the discipline.

Admission to the PhD program is available via one of two routes: 1) an appropriate master’s degree or 2) direct entry with an appropriate bachelor’s degree with high academic standing.

 

Field: French Linguistics

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of French Language and Literature's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate master's degree in French linguistics with high academic standing from a recognized university, with an average grade of at least an A– in the applicant's overall program.

  • An A– average does not automatically lead to admission.

  • A formal application and a sample of written work in French completed as part of the applicant's bachelor's or master's program in French linguistics as appropriate. This written work should be a copy of the MA thesis if available.

  • Applicants holding a master's degree must submit a statement of purpose (maximum 500 words) in French that clearly outlines the area in which the applicant intends to pursue research in French linguistics.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they are capable of independent research in French linguistics at an advanced level.

  • Admission to all programs for post-graduate degrees is based on the evidence of the supporting letters and the applicant's academic record.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • FRE 1103H Séminaire de linguistique I : Phonétique et phonologie (0.5 FCE);

    • FRE 1104H Séminaire de linguistique II : Syntaxe (0.5 FCE); and

    • FRE 1141H Séminaire de linguistique III : Linguistique expérimentale et linguistique de corpus (0.5 FCE) (unless already completed); and

    • FRE 1201H Méthodes de recherche (Credit/No Credit; 0.5 FCE).

  • Students must maintain an average grade of at least an A– during Year 1 to remain in good academic standing and to continue in the PhD program. With the department's permission, students may take 1.0 FCE outside the department.

  • Constitution of thesis committee. Students must submit a form indicating the members of their thesis committee and the provisional title of the thesis. This form must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student’s supervisory committee. Deadline to submit: June 15 of Year 1.

  • Thesis topic. Students must register a thesis topic with the department. The proposal must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student's supervisory committee. Deadline to register the topic: September 15 of Year 2.

  • Thesis proposal. A written thesis proposal, of 15 to 20 pages plus bibliography, must be submitted one week before the date of the oral field examination in April (see below).

  • Language requirements. Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Old French or of another language (excluding French or English), as approved by the department by the end of Year 1.

  • Field examination (written and oral components).

    • Students must pass the field examination in Year 2.

    • By November 15 of Year 2, students will submit a text of 20 to 25 pages (double-spaced) in article or thesis chapter format, which outlines the state of the art of current research in the primary domain of the dissertation. This text will form the basis of the short article (to be submitted by March 1) and will be assessed as Pass/Fail.

    • By March 1 of Year 2, students must successfully complete a document in the format of a short article which represents a pilot study or a theoretical puzzle in the field of study driven by data gathered by the student.

    • A student may not proceed to the oral part of the field examination until the written part has been successfully completed. In the case of a failure, the full supervisory committee will meet with the student in order to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the written part of the field examination be retaken in whole or in part within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program.

    • The oral part of the field examination is to be taken by April 30 of Year 2. It is based on a 15- to 20-page (double-spaced) "thesis proposal" accompanied by an appropriate bibliography. In the case of a failure, the supervisory committee will meet with the student to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the examination be retaken within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program. If the recommendation is to retake the exam, the student may retake the oral part of the examination once only.

  • Meet with supervisory committee. Between the completion of the written field examination, oral field examination, and the Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis, students will meet with the supervisory committee at least once a year and more frequently if required.

  • Thesis and Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of French Language and Literature's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized university that includes at least 7.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) in French language and linguistics, with an average grade of at least an A– in the overall program. A minimum of five of the seven full courses, or equivalent, should be in the proposed area of study (i.e., linguistics). Applicants may request that up to 2.0 FCEs of the 5.0 FCEs in the discipline come from cognate disciplines upon the department’s approval. Admission is limited to exceptionally qualified applicants.

  • An A– average does not automatically lead to admission.

  • A formal application and a sample of written work in French completed as part of the applicant's bachelor's program in French linguistics as appropriate.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they are capable of independent research in French linguistics at an advanced level.

  • Admission to all programs for post-graduate degrees is based on the evidence of the supporting letters and the applicant's academic record.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 7.5 FCEs as follows:

    • In Year 1, complete 4.0 FCEs. In Year 2, complete 3.5 FCEs. These include:

      • FRE 1103H Séminaire de linguistique I : Phonétique et phonologie (0.5 FCE);

      • FRE 1104H Séminaire de linguistique II : Syntaxe (0.5 FCE);

      • FRE 1141H Séminaire de linguistique III : Linguistique expérimentale et linguistique de corpus (0.5 FCE);

      • FRE 1201H Méthodes de recherche (Credit/No Credit; 0.5 FCE).

  • Students must maintain an average grade of at least an A– in Year 1 and Year 2 to remain in good academic standing and to continue in the PhD program. With the department's permission, students may take up to 1.0 FCE outside the department in each of Year 1 and Year 2.

  • Constitution of thesis committee. Students must submit a form indicating the members of their thesis committee and the provisional title of the thesis. This form must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student’s supervisory committee. Deadline to submit: June 15 of Year 2.

  • Thesis topic. Students must register a thesis topic with the department. The proposal must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student's supervisory committee. Deadline to register the topic: September 15 of Year 3.

  • Thesis proposal. A written thesis proposal, of 15 to 20 pages plus bibliography, must be submitted one week before the date of the oral field examination in April (see below).

  • Language requirements. Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Old French or of another language (excluding French or English), as approved by the department — by the end of Year 2.

  • Field examination (written and oral components).

    • Students must pass the field examination in Year 3.

    • By November 15 of Year 3, students will submit a text of 20 to 25 pages (double-spaced) in article or thesis chapter format, which outlines the state of the art of current research in the primary domain of the dissertation. This text will form the basis of the short article (to be submitted by March 1) and will be assessed as Pass/Fail.

    • By March 1 of Year 3, students must successfully complete a document in the format of a short article which represents a pilot study or a theoretical puzzle in the field of study driven by data gathered by the student.

    • A student may not proceed to the oral part of the field examination until the written part has been successfully completed. In the case of a failure, the supervisory committee will meet with the student in order to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the written part of the field examination be retaken in whole or in part within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program.

    • The oral part of the field examination is to be taken by April 30 of Year 3. It is based on a 15- to 20-page (double-spaced) "thesis proposal" accompanied by an appropriate bibliography. In the case of a failure, the supervisory committee will meet with the student to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the examination be retaken within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program. If the recommendation is to retake the exam, the student may retake the oral part of the examination once only.

  • Meet with supervisory committee. Between the completion of the written field examination, oral field examination, and the Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis, students will meet with the supervisory committee at least once a year and more frequently if required.

  • Thesis and Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

French Language and Literature: French Language and Literature PhD; Field: French Literature

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The Doctor of Philosophy is necessary preparation for a career in higher education in Canada and abroad which will include teaching and research at an advanced academic level. The PhD includes a combination of advanced seminars, field examinations, a high amount of embedded professional experience in teaching and research, and the presentation of the results of a significant contribution to the discipline in the form of an original dissertation.

The PhD program engages students in a program of study and research in French literature approved by the department. At the beginning of their course of study, students meet individually with the Associate Chair, Graduate in order to determine course selection with a view to ensuring that the student has a well-rounded program and, considered in conjunction with the undergraduate degree, has a broad knowledge of the discipline.

Admission to the PhD program is available via one of two routes: 1) an appropriate master’s degree or 2) direct entry with an appropriate bachelor’s degree with high academic standing.

 

Field: French Literature

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of French Language and Literature's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate master's degree in French literature with high academic standing from a recognized university, with an average grade of at least an A– in the applicant's overall program.

  • An A– average does not automatically lead to admission.

  • A formal application and a sample of written work in French completed as part of the applicant's bachelor's or master's program in French literature as appropriate. This written work should be a copy of the MA thesis if available.

  • Applicants holding a master's degree must submit a statement of purpose (maximum 500 words) in French that clearly outlines the area in which the applicant intends to pursue research in French literature.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they are capable of independent research in French literature at an advanced level.

  • Admission to all programs for post-graduate degrees is based on the evidence of the supporting letters and the applicant's academic record.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • FRE 1202H Séminaire de littérature 1 : théorie (0.5 FCE);

    • FRE 1203H Séminaire de littérature 2 : période (0.5 FCE);

    • FRE 1204H Séminaire de littérature 3 : genre (0.5 FCE) (unless these courses or their equivalents have already been completed); and

    • FRE 1201H Méthodes de recherche (Credit/No Credit; 0.5 FCE).

  • Students must maintain an average grade of at least an A– during Year 1 to remain in good academic standing and to continue in the PhD program. With the department's permission, students may take 1.0 FCE outside the department.

  • Constitution of thesis committee. Students must submit a form indicating the members of their thesis committee and the provisional title of the thesis. This form must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student’s supervisory committee. Deadline to submit: June 15 of Year 1.

  • Thesis topic. Students must register a thesis topic with the department. The proposal must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student's supervisory committee. Deadline to register the topic: September 15 of Year 2.

  • Thesis proposal. A written thesis proposal, of 15 to 20 pages plus bibliography, must be submitted one week before the date of the oral field examination in April (see below).

  • Language requirements. Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Old French or of another language (excluding French or English), as approved by the department by the end of Year 1.

  • Field examination (written and oral components).

    • Students must pass the field examination in Year 2.

    • By November 15 of Year 2, students will produce a written document of approximately 10 to 15 pages (double-spaced) outlining the major area — the literary corpus, the methodological and theoretical perspectives and approaches — from which the thesis will be derived, together with a thematically organized bibliography indicating the primary and secondary works relevant to this area that the student is expected to know in detail. The "outline of the major area" will form the basis for the written part of the field examination (to be submitted by March 1) and will be assessed as Pass/Fail.

    • By March 1 of Year 2, students must successfully complete a take-home examination designed to test the student's knowledge of the general area of their research; the examination questions are given to students a week ahead of the examination.

    • A student may not proceed to the oral part of the field examination until the written part has been successfully completed. In the case of a failure, the full supervisory committee will meet with the student in order to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the written part of the field examination be retaken in whole or in part within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program.

    • The oral part of the field examination is to be taken by April 30 of Year 2. It is based on a 15- to 20-page (double-spaced) "thesis proposal" accompanied by an appropriate bibliography. In the case of a failure, the supervisory committee will meet with the student to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the examination be retaken within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program. If the recommendation is to retake the exam, the student may retake the oral part of the examination once only.

  • Meet with supervisory committee. Between the completion of the written field examination, oral field examination, and the Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis, students will meet with the supervisory committee at least once a year and more frequently if required.

  • Thesis and Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of French Language and Literature's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized university that includes at least 7.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) in French language and literature, with an average grade of at least an A– in the overall program. A minimum of five of the seven full courses, or equivalent, should be in the proposed area of study (i.e., literature). Applicants may request that up to 2.0 FCEs of the 5.0 FCEs in the discipline come from cognate disciplines upon the department’s approval. Admission is limited to exceptionally qualified applicants.

  • An A– average does not automatically lead to admission.

  • A formal application and a sample of written work in French completed as part of the applicant's bachelor's program in French literature as appropriate.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they are capable of independent research in French literature at an advanced level.

  • Admission to all programs for post-graduate degrees is based on the evidence of the supporting letters and the applicant's academic record.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 7.5 FCEs as follows:

    • In Year 1, complete 4.0 FCEs. In Year 2, complete 3.5 FCEs. These include:

      • FRE 1202H Séminaire de littérature 1 : théorie (0.5 FCE);

      • FRE 1203H Séminaire de littérature 2 : période (0.5 FCE);

      • FRE 1204H Séminaire de littérature 3 : genre (0.5 FCE); and

      • FRE 1201H Méthodes de recherche (Credit/No Credit; 0.5 FCE).

  • Students must maintain an average grade of at least an A– in Year 1 and Year 2 to remain in good academic standing and to continue in the PhD program. With the department's permission, students may take up to 1.0 FCE outside the department in each of Year 1 and Year 2

  • Constitution of thesis committee. Students must submit a form indicating the members of their thesis committee and the provisional title of the thesis. This form must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student’s supervisory committee. Deadline to submit: June 15 of Year 2.

  • Thesis topic. Students must register a thesis topic with the department. The proposal must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student's supervisory committee. Deadline to register the topic: September 15 of Year 3.

  • Thesis proposal. A written thesis proposal, of 15 to 20 pages plus bibliography, must be submitted one week before the date of the oral field examination in April (see below).

  • Language requirements. Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Old French or of another language (excluding French or English), as approved by the department — by the end of Year 2.

  • Field examination (written and oral components).

    • Students must pass the field examination in Year 3.

    • By November 15 of Year 3, students will produce a written document of approximately 10 to 15 pages (double-spaced) outlining the major area — the literary corpus, the methodological and theoretical perspectives and approaches — from which the thesis will be derived, together with a thematically organized bibliography indicating the primary and secondary works relevant to this area that the student is expected to know in detail. The "outline of the major area" will form the basis for the written part of the field examination (to be submitted by March 1) and will be assessed as Pass/Fail.

    • By March 1 of Year 3, students must successfully complete a take-home examination designed to test the student's knowledge of the general area of their research; the examination questions are given to students a week ahead of the examination.

    • A student may not proceed to the oral part of the field examination until the written part has been successfully completed. In the case of a failure, the full supervisory committee will meet with the student in order to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the written part of the field examination be retaken in whole or in part within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program.

    • The oral part of the field examination is to be taken by April 30 of Year 3. It is based on a 15- to 20-page (double-spaced) "thesis proposal" accompanied by an appropriate bibliography. In the case of a failure, the supervisory committee will meet with the student to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the examination be retaken within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program. If the recommendation is to retake the exam, the student may retake the oral part of the examination once only.

  • Meet with supervisory committee. Between the completion of the written field examination, oral field examination, and the Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis, students will meet with the supervisory committee at least once a year and more frequently if required.

  • Thesis and Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

French Language and Literature: French Language and Literature MA, PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please consult the department regarding course availability.

Core Courses

Linguistics Courses

FRE 1103H
Séminaire de linguistique I : Phonétique et phonologie
FRE 1104H
Séminaire de linguistique II : Syntaxe
FRE 1141H
Séminaire de linguistique III : Linguistique expérimentale et linguistique de corpus

Literature Courses

FRE 1202H
Séminaire de littérature 1 : théorie
FRE 1203H
Séminaire de littérature 2 : période
FRE 1204H
Séminaire de littérature 3 : genre

Linguistic and Literature Courses

FRE 1201H
Méthodes de recherche (Credit/No Credit — for PhD students only)

Elective Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please consult the department regarding course availability.

Linguistics Courses

FRE 1002H+ Advanced Oral and Written French for Academic Purposes
FRE 1125H
Morphologie et sémantique
FRE 1128H Le français en contact
FRE 1129H Didactique du français langue seconde: quelle(s) méthode(s) pour quel(s) apprentissage(s)?
FRE 1132H
Problèmes de phonologie : les créoles à base lexicale française
FRE 1133H L'acquisition du français langue première
FRE 1136H
Arguments, structures et représentations en français
FRE 1137H
Les mots complexes : études de cas en morphologie
FRE 1138H
Bilinguisme et acquisition du langage
FRE 1139H
La variation sociolinguistique en français parlé
FRE 1140H
La syllabe : études expérimentales et théoriques
FRE 1141H Séminaire de linguistique III – Linguistique expérimentale et linguistique de corpus
FRE 1143H The Evolution of the French Language in Society Throughout the Centuries
FRE 1144H DP Structure and Adjunct Linearization in French and English
FRE 1145H La variation linguistique en français hexagonal
FRE 1146H Acquisition of Sociolinguistic Competence in L2 French
FRE 1147H Questions et réponses : aspects syntaxiques, phonologiques et discursifs (prerequisites: FRE 1104H, FRE 1141H )
FRE 1164H
Initiation au français médiéval

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Literature Courses

FRE 1306H Chanson de Roland
FRE 1612H
Satire et parole libre dans la littérature des XVIe et XVIIe siècles
FRE 1613H
Les récits de voyage dans la littérature française des XVIe et XVIIe siècles
FRE 1614H
Le roman aux XVIe et XVIIe siècles
FRE 1615H Littérature française et philosophie
FRE 1806H
Libertins, libertines et libertinage dans le roman du XVIIIe siècle
FRE 1813H Littérature de contact et pensée anthropologique en France du XVIe au XVIIIe siècle
FRE 1815H
Théorie de l'histoire
FRE 1901H
Le récit de voyage au XIXe siècle
FRE 1905H
Baudelaire et la modernité symboliste (1850–1900)
FRE 1906H
Théories du rire et analyse littéraire du genre comique
FRE 1928H
Zola et le naturalisme : du « roman exprimental » au « roman nouveau »
FRE 2004H
Formes et voies romanesques de l'extrême contemporain
FRE 2007H
Littérature et éthique : nouveaux textes, nouvelles problématiques
FRE 2011H Écrire l’athéisme. perspectives littéraires et philosophiques
FRE 2035H
Autour de l'intime en France: les écrits contemporains des femmes
FRE 2036H
Configurations du genre sexuel dans la prose contemporaine des femmes
FRE 2037H
Écriture et folie
FRE 2039H
Roman et critique sociale aux XXe et XXIe siècles
FRE 2041H
Mémoires (Post)coloniales
FRE 2042H
Intertextualité
FRE 2078H
Altérité : formes et significations
FRE 2079H
Le Roman postmoderne
FRE 2080H
Le sujet en mouvement : migrant et transnational
FRE 2100H
Du texte à l'image : Images photographiques et cinématographiques dans quelques textes contemporains
FRE 2102H Enjeux des productions culturelles autochtones de langue française au Canada
FRE 2103H
La nouvelle québécoise contemporaine : l'émergence des voix féminines
FRE 2105H
Écritures du moi: de la représentation textuelle à la représentation visuelle du sujet écrivant
FRE 2107H
Le récit fantastique québécois : formes et transformations
FRE 2109H Histoire des pratiques littéraires et culturelles des femmes au Québec (1830-1960)
FRE 3002H Pourquoi la poésie
FRE 3004H Rencontres et compagnonnages au coeur de l’oeuvre
FRE 3005H Méthodologie de l'analyse du dialogue Romanesque

Other Courses

FRE 4000Y
Reading Course
FRE 4001H
Reading Course
FRE 4002H
Reading Course
FRE 5000Y0
Research Essay (MA)
FRE 5001H0
Research Essay (MA)

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

Joint Courses

JFC 1255H Aspects du Structuralism
JFC 1813H
Littérature de contact et pensée anthropologique en France du XVIe au XVIIIe siècle /
Literature of Contact and Anthropological Thought, 16th–18th Century
JFC 5025H
Feminism and Postmodernism: Theory and Practice
JFC 5056H
Autobiography, Photography, Narrativity
JFC 5105H
Collections of Knowledge: Encyclopedism and Travel Literature in Early Modern Europe (1500–1800)
JFC 5120H
The Gift: Stories of a Paradigm
JFC 5129H
Performative Autobiographical Acts: Painted and Photographic Representations of Self in Personal and Political Testimonials
JFC 5136H Allegory and Allegorism in Literature and Fine Arts
JFF 1100H
Surréalisme et cinéma /
Surrealism and French Cinema
JFF 1101H The Art of Exploration: How to Think the World
JRL 1110H
Second Language Acquisition of Romance Languages
JRL 1111H
Second Language Acquisition of Romance Phonology

Cross-Listed Courses

Book History and Print Culture

BKS 1001H
Introduction to Book History
BKS 1002H
Book History in Practice
BKS 2000H
Advanced Seminar in Book History and Print Culture

Medieval Studies

MST 3232H Vernacular Literature in Medieval Europe: Status and Function
MST 3154H
Book History and Print Culture
MST 3155H
Chrétien de Troyes, Perceval

Sexual Diversity Studies

SDS 1000H
Theoretical and Methodological Issues in Sexual Diversity Studies