Anthropology

Anthropology: Introduction

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Faculty Affiliation

Arts and Science​

Degree Programs

Anthropology

​MA​, MSc, and PhD
Fields:
Archaeology
Evolutionary Anthropology
Linguistic and Semiotic Anthropology
Medical Anthropology
Sociocultural Anthropology

​Collaborative Specializations

The following collaborative specializations are available to students in participating degree programs as ​listed below:

  1. Aboriginal Health
    • Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
  2. Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Acr​oss the Life Course
    • Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
  3. Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies
    • Anthropology, MA
  4. Diaspora and Transnational Studies
    • Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
  5. Environmental Studies
    • Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
  6. Ethnic and Pluralism Studies
    • Anthropology, MA, PhD
  7. Global Health
    • Anthropology, PhD
  8. Jewish Studies
    • Anthropology, MA, PhD
  9. Sexual Diversity Studies
    • Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
  10. South Asian Studies
    • Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
  11. Women and Gender Studies
    • Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD
  12. Women's Health
    • Anthropology, MA, MSc, PhD​

Overview

Anthropology is concerned with the unity, diversity and evolution of humanity (and non-human  primates) and of human culture and society from a comparative and global perspective. The Department of Anthropology was established in 1936 and has included many of the most prominent figures in Canadian anthropology. The first MA degree was awarded in 1949; the first PhD in 1956.

Members of the department conduct research on present and past human societies, cultural knowledge and practice, evolutionary antecedents, and closely related species. We offer graduate training in socio-cultural, medical, evolutionary/biological, linguistic, and archaeological branches of the field. Anthropology students at the University of Toronto can study human biology and evolution; human behaviour from its first appearance in the archaeological record to the first appearance of writing; language and society; anthropology of health; and the diversity of human culture in today’s world. Since Anthropology concerns the diversity and commonality of humans over time and around the globe, faculty and graduate research is broadly international and varies in method and theoretical frame. Nonetheless, it coheres in the quest to understand past and present human experience in social, cultural and evolutionary contexts.

Contact and Address

Web: www.anthropology.utoro​nto.ca
Email: anthropology.graduate@utoronto.ca
Telephone: (416) 978-5416
Fax: (416) 978-3217

Department of Anthropology
University of Toronto
Room 256, 19 Russell Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2S2
Canada

Anthropology: Graduate Faculty

Full Members

Bamford, Sandra - BA, MA, MPA, PhD
Banning, Edward - BA, MA, PhD (Graduate Chair)
Barker, Joshua - BA, MA, PhD
Begun, David - BA, MA, PhD (Graduate Coordinator)
Boddy, Janice - BA, MA, PhD
Chazan, Michael - BA, MA, PhD
Cody, Francis - PhD
Coleman, Simon - BA, PhD
Coupland, Gary - BA, MA, PhD
Crawford, Gary - BSc, MA, PhD
Cunningham, Hilary - BA, MA, PhD
Danesi, Marcel - BA, MA, PhD
Daswani, Girish - BSc, BSc, MS, PhD
Dave, Prakruti - BA, MA, PhD
Friesen, T Max - BA, MA, PhD
Galloway, Tracey - BScN, MA, PhD
Gillison, Gillian - BA, PhD
Heller, Monica - BA, MA, PhD
Kalmar, Ivan - BA, MA, PhD
Lambek, Michael - BA, MA, PhD
Lehman, Shawn - BA, MA, PhD
Li, Tania - BA, PhD
Luong, Hy Van - BA, PhD
McElhinny, Bonnie - BA, MA, MA, PhD, PhD
Miller, Heather - BA, MSc, MA, PhD
Mortensen, Lena - BA, MA, PhD
Muehlebach, Andrea - MA, PhD
Napolitano, Valentina - BSc, MPH, PhD
Parra, Esteban - BA, MA, PhD
Paz, Alejandro - BA, MPA, MA, PhD
Pfeiffer, Susan - BA, MA, PhD
Rogers, Tracy - BA, MA, PhD
Sanders, Todd - BA, MA, MSc, PhD
Satsuka, Shiho - BA, BA, MA, PhD
Sawchuk, Lawrence - BA, MA, PhD
Schillaci, Michael - BA, MA, PhD
Sellen, Daniel - BA, AM, PhD
Sidnell, Jack - BA, MA, PhD
Silcox, Mary Teresa - BSc, PhD
Smith, David - BA, MA, PhD
Song, Jesook - BA, PhD
Swenson, Edward - BA, MA, PhD
Teichroeb, Julie - BSc, MA, PhD
Viola, T. Bence - MSc, PhD
Wardlow, Holly - BA, MA, MPH, PhD

Members Emeriti

Alderson-Smith, Gavin - BA, MA, DPhil
Burton, Frances - BSc, MA, PhD
Chew, John - BA, MA, PhD
Drewitt, Robert - BA, PhD
Kleindienst, Maxine - BA, MA, PhD
Latta, Martha - BA, MA, DPhil
Lee, Richard - BA, MA, PhD
Levin, Michael - BA, MA, PhD
Mavalwala, Jamshed D - MS, PhD
Nagata, Shuichi - BS, MA, PhD
Philpott, Stuart - BA, MA, PhD
Ray, Ajit - BSc, MSc, PhD
Samarin, William - BA, PhD
Vanderburgh, Rosamond - BA, MA

Associate Members

Bright, Kristin - PhD
Crowder, Christian - BA, MA, PhD
Gamble, Julia - BA, MA, PhD
Gotlib Conn, Lesley - BA, MA, PhD
Harrison, Timothy - BA, MA, PhD
Klassen, Pamela - BA, MA, PhD
Knappett, Carl - MA, PhD
Magne, Martin - BSc, MA, PhD
Maher, Lisa - BSc, PhD
Mant, Madeleine - BA, MSc, PhD
Mittermaier, Amira - MA, PhD
Munson, Marit - BA, MA, PhD
O'Reilly, Andrea - BA, MA, PhD
Patton, Anna - BA, MA, PhD
Williamson, Ronald - BA, MA, PhD
Young, Donna Jean - BA, MA, PhD
Zubrow, Ezra - BA, PhD

Anthropology: Anthropology MA

Master of Arts​

Program Description

The department offers a Master of Arts degree program, both full-time and part-time. The full-time program normally extends over a 12-month period lasting from September to September.

 

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Anthropology’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • B+ average or equivalent.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they have the appropriate background to enter a particular program of graduate study.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • A brief statement of interest (not exceeding 1,000 words).

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including: 

    • 0.5 FCE: ANT 3047H or ANT 4020H or ANT 6100H

    • 1.0 FCE: ANT 2000Y

    • 2.0 FCEs: at least 1.0 FCE of which must be in Anthropology

    • Exceptions to coursework requirements must be approved by the advisor and Graduate Coordinator.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S);
6 sessions part-time

​Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Anthropology: Anthropology MSc

Master of Science​

Program Description

The MSc program is most appropriate for students who are considering careers in consulting archaeology, some aspects of medical or forensic anthropology, NGO work, or application to PhD programs in Anthropology at other Canadian universities.

The full-time two-year program is normally completed by the summer of Year 2. The MSc program can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

 

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Anthropology’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • B+ average or equivalent.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they have the appropriate background to enter a particular program of graduate study.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • A brief statement of interest (not exceeding 1,000 words).

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 4.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including: 

    • 0.5 FCE: ANT 3047H or ANT 4020H or ANT 6100H

    • 1.0 FCE: ANT 2500Y

    • 3.0 FCEs of which 1.5 FCEs will normally be science courses in archaeology, evolutionary anthropology, medical anthropology, or related disciplines depending on the student's program

    • Exceptions to coursework requirements must be approved by the advisor and Graduate Coordinator.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S);
9 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Anthropology: Anthropology PhD

​Doctor of Philosophy​

Program Description

The Doctor of Philosophy is primarily a research degree. A program of study is designed for each student to ensure competence in a field of research, culminating in the writing of a thesis.

Applicants may enter the PhD program via one of two routes: 1) following completion of an appropriate master’s degree or 2) direct entry after completing a bachelor’s degree.

Depending on subfield or area of research, completion of the PhD may take longer than the indicated program length below. See the departmental handbook for details.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Anthropology’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Admission is offered primarily to excellent students who, by the time of enrolment, have completed a master’s degree in anthropology (or a cognate subject).

  • All applicants are expected to have achieved grades averaging the equivalent of a University of Toronto A- or better in their last full year of study. Most successful applicants will have finished or be in the process of completing an MA or MSc.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they have the appropriate background to enter a particular program of graduate study.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • A brief statement of interest (not exceeding 1,000 words).

  • Applicants are required to identify departmental members with whom they want to conduct PhD research. The department regrets that it cannot admit students to the PhD program, regardless of their qualifications, unless a supervisor is available.

  • Undergraduate students with strong backgrounds in anthro​pology or relevant disciplines (GPA of 3.70 or above in their last 5.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) and who have earned an appropriate bachelor’s degree with a concentration in anthropology or a cognate discipline may apply directly for admission​ to the PhD program.

Program Requirements

  • At the beginning of the academic year, each student will submit, with the SGS enrolment form, a program statement describing his or her plan to meet program requirements.

  • A minimum of 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs), at least 1.5 of which are normally in anthropology.

  • Attain at least an A- average in coursework to continue in the PhD program in good standing.

  • Submit research proposal by the end of the second session of Year 2 (e.g., May 1 for students who start in September).

  • Before proceeding to full-time research (achieving candidacy), students must:

    • ​​​​​​​​​​Be resident on campus for one year.

    • Complete the minimum of 3.0 FCEs (noted above), at least 1.5 of which are normally in anthropology.

    • Gain experience in research methods and design; requirement can be filled by completing coursework in methodology or, with the department’s assent, undertaking faculty-supervised fieldwork or laboratory research. Each student will normally be involved in fieldwork, in the broad meaning of the term, and in theoretical analysis.

    • Present and defend a thesis proposal.

    • Demonstrate an adequate knowledge of at least one language other than English, unless their program of study requires the intensive and time-consuming mastery of another research tool; demonstration of adequate language or equivalent knowledge can be accomplished in a variety of ways, a list of which is available in the Department of Anthropology’s Graduate Student Handbook.​

    • An approved Ethics Protocol for all students working with living organisms and modern human remains.

Program Length

4 years

Although the program has been designed for completion in four years, some students may require a longer period to complete all of the requirements.

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Anthropology’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Undergraduate students with strong backgrounds in anthropology or relevant disciplines (GPA of 3.70 or above in their last 5.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) and who have earned an appropriate bachelor’s degree with a concentration in anthropology or a cognate discipline may apply directly for admission to the PhD program.

  • All applicants are expected to have achieved grades averaging the equivalent of a University of Toronto A- or better in their last full year of study. 

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they have the appropriate background to enter a particular program of graduate study.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • A brief statement of interest (not exceeding 1,000 words).

  • Applicants are required to identify departmental members with whom they want to conduct PhD research. The department regrets that it cannot admit students to the PhD program, regardless of their qualifications, unless a supervisor is available.

Program Requirements

  • At the beginning of the academic year, each student will submit, with the SGS enrolment form, a program statement describing his or her plan to meet program requirements.

  • Students must complete 5.0 graduate full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 3.0 FCEs normally be taken in Year 1

    • 2.0 FCEs taken in Year 2, when work on the research proposal is also expected to begin.

  • Attain an annual average of at least A- to continue in the PhD program in good standing.

  • Submit research proposal by the end of the second session of Year 3 (e.g., May 1 for students who start in September).

  • Before proceeding to full-time research (achieving candidacy), students must:

    • Be resident on campus for one year.

    • Complete the minimum 5.0 FCEs (noted above), at least 1.5 of which are normally in anthropology.

    • Gain experience in research methods and design; requirement can be filled by completing coursework in methodology or, with the department’s assent, undertaking faculty-supervised fieldwork or laboratory research. Each student will normally be involved in fieldwork, in the broad meaning of the term, and in theoretical analysis.

    • Present and defend a thesis proposal.

    • Demonstrate an adequate knowledge of at least one language other than English, unless their program of study requires the intensive and time-consuming mastery of another research tool; demonstration of adequate language or equivalent knowledge can be accomplished in a variety of ways, a list of which is available in the Department of Anthropology’s Graduate Student Handbook.

    • An approved Ethics Protocol for all students working with living organisms and modern human remains.

Program Length

5 years

Although the program has been designed for completion in five years, some students may require a longer period to complete all of the requirements.

Time Limit

7 years 

Anthropology: Anthropology MA, MSc, PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Check with the department for the current year’s offerings.

General

​ANT 1000H
Introductory Ma​sters Workshop (Credit/No Credit)​
​ANT 1099H
​Quantitative Methods II
​ANT 1155H,Y+
Research (or reading seminar)​
​ANT 1156H,Y+
Research (or reading seminar)​
​ANT 1157H,Y+
Research (or reading seminar)​
​ANT 1158H,Y+
Research (or reading seminar)​
​ANT 2000Y0
MA Research Paper​
​ANT 2500Y0
MSc Research Paper​
​​​​JTH 3000H
​Coordinating Seminar in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies (for students in the Ethnic and Pluralism Studies collaborative specialization)

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Archaeology

​JPA 1040Y
​​Advanced Physics and Archaeology
​ANT 4010H
Archaeology in Contemporary Society​
​ANT 4020H
​Archaeology Theory
​ANT 4025H
​Archaeology of Eastern North America
​ANT 4026H
​Arctic Archaeology
​ANT 4028H
Violence and Civilization​
​​ANT 4030H
​Artifacts
​ANT 4031H
​Value
​ANT 4038H
​Archaeology of Urban Development
​ANT 4039H
Origin and Nature of Food Producing Societies​
​ANT 4040H
​Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers
​ANT 4041H
​Landscape Archaeology
​ANT 4042H
​Archaeology of Complex Hunter-Gatherers
​ANT 4043H
​Archaeology of Ritual, Religion, and Ideology
​ANT 4044H
​Interregional Interaction in the Ancient World
​ANT 4045H
​Mortuary Archaeology
​ANT 4046H
​Archaeology of Style
​ANT 4050H
​Zooarchaeology
​ANT 4059H
Anthropological Understanding of Cultural Transmission​
​ANT 4060H
​Specific Problems I
​ANT 4065H
Specific Problems II​
​ANT 4066H
Household Archaeology​
​ANT 4068H
Archaeology of Technology​

Evolutionary Anthropology

​​ANT 3005H
​​Advanced Topics in Paleoanthropology​
​ANT 3010H
​Human Osteology: Theory and Practice
​ANT 3011H
Palaeopathology​
​​ANT 3031H,Y
Advanced Research Seminar I​
​ANT 3034H,Y+
Advanced Research Seminar IV​
​ANT 3035H
​Primate Sexual Selection
​ANT 3041H
Evolutionary Perspectives on Growth and Development​
ANT 3042H​
​Advanced Topics in Primate Ecology
​ANT 3043H
​Comparative Methods in Biological Anthropology
​ANT 3044H
Current Topics in Primate Social Behaviour​
​ANT 3045H
​Advanced Topics in Non-Human Primate Evolution
​ANT 3046H
​Paleoecology in Primate and Human Evolution
​ANT 3047H
​Evolutionary Anthropology Theory
​ANT 3048H
​Primatological Theory and Methods
​ANT 3438H
​Skeletal Trauma and Violence: Theory and Practice
​ANT 3439H
​Advanced Seminar in Forensic Anthropology
​ANT 3440H
​Molecular Anthropology: Theory and Practice

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Linguistic and Semiotic Anthropology

​JAL 1140H
Special Topics in Anthropology and Linguistics​​
​JAL 1153H
​Conversational Structures
​JAL 1155H
​Language and Gender
​ANT 5144H
Foundations in Linguistic Anthropology​
​ANT 5148H
​Language, Ideology and Political Economy
​ANT 5150H
​Nation, State, and Language in Francophone Canada
ANT 5151H Metaphor, Language, and Science
​​JSA 5147H
​Language, Nationalism, and Post-Nationalism​

Medical Anthropology

​ANT ​7001H
​Medical Anthropology I​
​ANT 7002H
Medical Anthropology II​
​ANT 7003H
​Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives​

Sociocultural Anthropology

​ANT 6003H
Critical Issues in Ethnography I​​​
​ANT 6004H
​Critical Issues in Ethnography II
​ANT 6005H
The Politics of Distribution: Work, Welfare and Abandonment in Precarious Times​
​ANT 6006H
​Genealogies of Anthropological Thought
​ANT 6007H
Magic, Science, and Religion​
​ANT 6008H
Posthuman Anthropology​
​ANT 6010H
Anthropology of Korea: History and Dialogues with Other Disciplines within Korean Studies​
​​ANT 6014H
Media and Mediation​
​ANT 6017H
Post-colonial Science Studies and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge Translation​
​ANT 6018H
Approaches to Nature and Culture​
​ANT 6019H
Anthropology of Neoliberalism​
​​​ANT 6021H
​Political Anthropology: State, Power, and Sovereignty
​ANT 6022H
​Symbolic Anthropology: Structuralism, Hermeneutics, and Poststructuralism
​ANT 6025H
​Anthropology and Epistemology
ANT 6027H​
​Anthropology of Violence
​ANT 6029H
​Anthropology of Capitalism
​ANT 6030H
​Anthropology and the Ethical Imagination
​ANT 6031H,Y
​Advanced Research Seminar I
​ANT 6032H
​Advanced Research Seminar II
​ANT 6033H,Y
​Advanced Research Seminar III
​ANT 6034H,Y
Advanced Research Seminar IV​
​ANT 6037H,Y
​Advanced Research Seminar VII
​ANT 6038H,Y+
Advanced Research Seminar VIII​
​ANT 6040H
Research Design and Fieldwork Methods​
​ANT 6050H
​Reading Course
​ANT 6055H
Anthropology of Subjectivity and Personhood​
​ANT 6056H
​Decolonizing Diversity Discourse: Critical and Comparative Accounts of Multiculturalism and Settler Colonialism
​​ANT 6057H
​Anthropology and Literature
​ANT 6058H
​Anthropology of Normativity
​ANT 6059H
​Anthropology and History
ANT 6060H Anthropology and Indigenous Studies in North America
ANT 6100H History of Anthropological Thought
​JAR 6510H
From Theory to Ethnography: Anthropological Approaches to Religion​

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.