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Addiction Studies: Courses

Core Course

Course Code Course Title
PAS3700H
Multidisciplinary Aspects of Addictions

Elective Courses

Course Code Course Title
APD1291H
Addictive Behaviours: Approaches to Assessment and Intervention
CHL5120H
Population Health Perspectives on Mental Health and Addictions
CHL5417H
Tobacco and Health: From Cells to Society
JPM1005Y
Behavioural Pharmacology
MSC1085H
Molecular Approaches to Mental Health and Addictions
PAS3701H
Advanced Research Issues in Addictions
SWK4616H
Drug Dependencies: Interventive Approaches
Addiction Studies (Collaborative Specialization)
Addiction Studies: Doctoral Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants who wish to enrol in the collaborative specialization must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and a graduate degree program in one of the collaborating graduate units. They must contact the collaborating professor within their graduate unit directly.

Specialization Requirements

  • Doctoral students in the collaborative specialization are required to take PAS3700H Multidisciplinary Aspects of Addictions, if they have not already done so, plus an additional 0.5 full-course equivalent (FCE) (not taken previously) from the approved listing of elective courses presented below or an approved directed reading course.

  • Students must meet all requirements of their home graduate unit in terms of coursework and thesis work, or equivalent.

  • The student's thesis must deal with a subject in the field of addictions. The thesis is supervised and evaluated in the same manner as others in the home graduate unit, but normally involves, as appropriate, supervisory and examining professors from other disciplines represented in the collaborative specialization. In collaborating graduate units that do not require a thesis, a practicum or major research paper will be accepted instead of a thesis, as long as the topic or focus is directly related to addictions. In collaborating graduate units that do not have a thesis or equivalent requirement, students must take a third 0.5 FCE from the list of approved electives.

Addiction Studies (Collaborative Specialization)
Addiction Studies: Master's Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and a graduate degree program in one of the collaborating graduate units. They must contact the collaborating professor within their graduate unit directly.

Specialization Requirements

  • Students must meet all requirements of their home graduate unit in terms of coursework and thesis work, or equivalent.

  • Master's students in the collaborative specialization are required to take PAS3700H Multidisciplinary Aspects of Addictions, plus 0.5 full-course equivalent (FCE) selected from the list of approved elective courses presented below or an approved directed reading course.

  • The student's thesis must deal with a subject in the field of addictions. The thesis is supervised and evaluated in the same manner as others in the home graduate unit, but normally involves, as appropriate, supervisory and examining professors from other disciplines represented in the collaborative specialization. In collaborating graduate units that do not require a thesis, a practicum or major research paper will be accepted instead of a thesis, as long as the topic or focus is directly related to addictions. In collaborating graduate unit that do not have a thesis or equivalent requirement, students must take a third 0.5 FCE from the list of approved electives.

Addiction Studies (Collaborative Specialization)
Aerospace Studies: Aerospace Science and Engineering: MASc

Master of Applied Science

Program Description

The Master of Applied Science (MASc) degree is a research-based program focused on the completion of a research thesis. The MASc is considered to provide basic training in research for students subsequent to an undergraduate program. Under the direction of a faculty supervisor, students will select a research topic, perform experiments, computation, or analysis relevant to the topic, and report their results in a thesis. Upon completion of the thesis, students will be prepared for further academic research or employment in industry, including in research and development settings. Top students may have the opportunity to transfer directly to the PhD program after their first year of MASc studies.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy UTIAS’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate four-year undergraduate degree in in engineering, mathematics, physics, or chemistry from a recognized university.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework to be completed in Year 1. Students must complete a minimum of 2.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (five half courses) as follows:

    • All courses must be technical.

    • At least half of the required FCEs must be courses offered at UTIAS.

    • Complete AER1800H Research Seminar in Aerospace Science and Engineering (0.5 FCE).

    • Students must achieve at least a B- average to be in good academic standing. Failure in any course taken for credit may result in termination of the student's registration.

    • Students deemed to have insufficient background may be required to complete supplementary coursework in addition to the required 2.5 FCEs.

  • Complete the non-credit course JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE).

  • Attend a total of 12 approved seminars.

  • Have research performance assessed by a Research Assessment Committee (RAC), which includes the student's supervisor. For students making excellent research progress, the RAC may recommend that a student be considered for direct transfer to the PhD program.

  • Write a thesis based on research performed during the period of registration for the MASc based on a topic selected in consultation with the student's supervisor.

  • Present a seminar on the student's research at the UTIAS Departmental MASc Seminar (DMS).

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Aerial Robotics; Robotics; Sustainable Aviation; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Aerospace Science and Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis



Master of Applied Science
Program Length: 5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time


 
Aerospace Studies
Aerospace Studies: Aerospace Science and Engineering: MASc, MEng, PhD Courses

This list represents course offerings at the time of publication. Course descriptions are available on the UTIAS website. Courses marked (PR) have prerequisites.

Aircraft Flight Systems

Course Code Course Title
AER503H
Aeroelasticity
AER1202H
Advanced Flight Dynamics
AER1211H
Human Control of Flight Systems
AER1216H
Fundamentals of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
AER1217H
Development of Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Systems
(Prerequisite: AER1216H.)

Aerodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, and Propulsion

Course Code Course Title
AER510H
Aerospace Propulsion
AER1301H
Kinetic Theory of Gases
AER1303H
Advanced Fluid Mechanics (PR)
AER1304H
Fundamentals of Combustion
AER1306H
Special Topics in Reacting Flows
AER1307H Fundamentals of Aeroacoustics
AER1308H
Introduction to Modern Flow Control
AER1310H
Turbulence Modelling
AER1311H
Unsteady Gasdynamics
AER1316H
Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics
AER1318H
Topics in Computational Fluid Dynamics
AER1319H
Finite Volume Methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics
AER1324H
Introduction to Turbulence
(Exclusion: MIE1207H.)
AER1326H
Aeroacoustics

Structures and Multidisciplinary Optimization

Course Code Course Title
AER501H
Advanced Mechanics of Structures
AER1403H
Advanced Aerospace Structures (PR)
AER1410H
Topology Optimization
AER1415H
Computational Optimization
AER1416H
Numerical Methods for Uncertainty Quantification
AER1418H
Variational Methods for Partial Differential Equations

Sustainable Aviation

Course Code Course Title
AER1315H
Sustainable Aviation

Robotics and Space Systems Engineering

Course Code Course Title
AER506H
Spacecraft Dynamics and Control I
AER521H
Mobile Robotics and Perception
AER525H
Robotics
AER1503H
Spacecraft Dynamics and Control II
AER1512H
Multibody Dynamics
AER1513H
State Estimation for Aerospace Vehicles
AER1515H
Perception for Robotics
(Exclusions: AER1514H, ROB1514H.)
AER1516H Robot Motion Planning
AER1517H Control for Robotics
AER1520H
Microsatellite Design I
AER1521H
Microsatellite Design II
ROB1514H
Mobile Robotics

Management and Policy

Course Code Course Title
AER1601H
Aerospace Engineering and Operations Management
AER1604H
Air Accident Investigation

Engineering Physics

Course Code Course Title
AER507H
Introduction to Fusion Energy
AER1717H
Applied Plasma Physics I
(Reading course.)

Research Seminars and Professional Courses

Course Code Course Title
AER1800H
Research Seminar in Aerospace Science and Engineering
(For Year 1 MASc students only.)
AER1810H
MEng Project
(For MEng students only.)
JDE1000H
Ethics in Research
(Students registered in the MASc or PhD programs are required to participate in this non-credit seminar course during their first or second session of registration. This course must be completed in order to graduate.)

Reading Courses

Course Code Course Title
AER1820H
Directed Reading in Aerospace Studies

APS Engineering Course

Course Code Course Title
APS1012H
Managing Business Innovation and Transformational Change
APS1043H Writing Your Own Patent Application
Aerospace Studies
Aerospace Studies: Aerospace Science and Engineering: MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases

Emphasis: Advanced Manufacturing (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete:

  • Four half courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]), including at least one core course.

  • Elective courses may include other core courses, and courses from either of two streams: Manufacturing Engineering and Manufacturing Management.

Core Courses

AER501H Advanced Mechanics of Structures
AER1403H Advanced Aerospace Structures
APS1028H Operations and Production Management for Manufacturing and Services
CHE1123H Liquid Biofuels
MIE519H Advanced Manufacturing Technologies
MIE1740H Smart Materials and Structures.

Elective Courses — Manufacturing Engineering

AER521H, AER1415H,
CHE575H, CHE1134H, CHE1475H,
MIE506H, MIE540H, MIE1706H, MIE1713H, MIE1718H, MIE1743H,
MSE1013H, MSE1015H, MSE1028H, MSE1031H, MSE1043H, MSE1058H, MSE1061H,
ROB501H.

Elective Courses — Manufacturing Management

APS1005H, APS1012H, APS1013H, APS1017H, APS1020H, APS1023H, APS1040H, APS1088H, APS1420H,
CHE561H, CHE1434H,
MIE523H, MIE1022H, MIE1505H, MIE1514H, MIE1715H, MIE1721H, MIE1723H, MIE1727H,
TEP1011H, TEP1026H, TEP1501H.

 

Emphasis: Aerial Robotics (MASc, MEng, PhD)

MASc and PhD students must successfully complete:

  • 1.0 full-course equivalent [FCE]): AER1216H Fundamentals of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and AER1217H Development of Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Systems;

  • one other course from the approved course list, which will be updated on a regular basis, or other related courses approved by professors; and

  • one MASc or PhD thesis relevant to unmanned aerial vehicles.

MEng students must successfully complete:

  • 1.0 full-course equivalent [FCE]): AER1216H Fundamentals of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and AER1217H Development of Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Systems;

  • one other course from the approved list or other related courses approved by professors; and

  • one MEng project course related to unmanned aerial vehicles.

Elective Courses

AER501H, AER503H, AER506H, AER510H, AER521H, AER525H, AER1202H, AER1211H, AER1214H, AER1215H, AER1303H, AER1308H, AER1316H, AER1324H, AER1403H, AER1410H, AER1415H, AER1503H, AER1513H, AER1514H,
CSC411H, CSC2503H, CSC2545H,
ECE537H, ECE1512H, ECE1505H, ECE1747H, ECE1762H,
MIE506H, MIE1068H, MIE1740H, MIE1742H, MIE1809H,
ROB521H, ROB1514H.

 

Emphasis: Engineering and Globalization (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete four half courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) from the following lists, with at least two half courses (or one full course) taken from Group A.

Group A

APS510H, APS530H, APS1420H, JCR1000Y (full-year course).

Group B

APS1015H, APS1020H, APS1024H, CHL5700H, CIV1399H, JMG2020H.

Note: Students who choose to pursue an MEng project in their home department that aligns with the Centre for Global Engineering (CGEN)'s disciplinary focus, as deemed by the CGEN Director, may count the project as one required Group B course.

Students who complete the requirements of the emphasis in Engineering and Globalization and wish to obtain a notation on their transcript should contact the Faculty Graduate Studies office.

 

Emphasis: Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE) (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete any four of the following courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]):

Leadership

TEP1010H, TEP1011H, TEP1026H, TEP1027H, TEP1029H, TEP1030H, TEP1501H, TEP1502H, TEP1601H.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

APS1012H, APS1013H, APS1015H, APS1023H, APS1033H, APS1035H, APS1036H, APS1041H, APS1061H, APS1088H.

Finance and Management

AER1601H, APS502H, APS1001H, APS1004H, APS1005H, APS1009H, APS1016H, APS1017H, APS1020H, APS1022H, APS1028H, APS1032H, APS1038H, APS1039H, APS1040H, APS1043H, APS1049H, APS1050H, APS1051H, APS1052H.

Engineering and Society

APS510H, APS1018H, APS1024H, APS1025H, APS1031H, APS1034H, APS1101H, APS1420H.

 

Emphasis: Robotics (MASc, MEng, PhD)

Students must successfully complete four courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) chosen from at least two of the following groups, and no more than two in any given group:

Group 1: Planning and Control

AER1516H, AER1517H,
ECE557H (exclusion: ECE410H), ECE1619H, ECE1635H, ECE1636H, ECE1647H, ECE1653H, ECE1657H,
MIE1064H, MIE1068H.

Group 2: Perception and Learning

AER1513H, AER1515H,
CSC2503H, CSC2506H, CSC2515H, CSC2541H, CSC2548H,
ECE516H, ECE1511H, ECE1512H,
JEB1433H,
ROB501H.

Group 3: Modelling and Dynamics

AER506H, AER1503H, AER1512H,
JEB1444H,
MIE1001H.

Group 4: Systems Design and Integration

AER525H (exclusion: ECE470H), AER1216H, AER1217H,
CSC2621H,
ECE470H (exclusion: AER525H),
MIE505H, MIE506H, MIE1070H, MIE1075H, MIE1076H, MIE1080H, MIE1809H,
ROB521H, ROB1514H.

 

Emphasis: Sustainable Aviation (MASc, MEng, PhD)

MASc and PhD students must successfully complete:

  • At least two half courses (1.0 full-course equivalent [FCE]) from: AER1303H, AER1304H, AER1306H, AER1308H, AER1310H, AER1316H, AER1318H, AER1319H, AER1403H, AER1418H, AER501H, AER510H, CIV1307H, PHY1498H, PHY2504H, PHY2505H, CHE1123H, JCC1313H.

  • AER1315H (0.5 FCE).

  • A thesis in an area of relevance to sustainable aviation with approval of the Scientific Committee.

MEng students must successfully complete:

  • At least four half courses (2.0 FCEs) from: AER1303H, AER1304H, AER1306H, AER1308H, AER1310H, AER1316H, AER1318H, AER1319H, AER1403H, AER1418H, AER501H, AER510H, CIV1307H, PHY1498H, PHY2504H, PHY2505H, CHE1123H, JCC1313H.

  • AER1315H (0.5 FCE).

 

Emphasis: Sustainable Energy (MASc, MEng, PhD)

MASc and PhD students must successfully complete:

  • At least three half courses (1.5 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) from either of the following lists below.

  • A thesis towards their degree on a topic related to sustainable energy. Topics must be approved by the steering committee of the Institute of Sustainable Energy. Contact: Mandeep Rayat.

MEng students must successfully complete:

  • Four half courses (2.0 FCEs) from either of the following lists below, including at least one core course (0.5 FCE).

Core Courses

APS1032H Introduction to Energy Project Management
MIE515H Alternative Energy Systems
MIE1120H Current Energy Infrastructure and Resources.

Elective Courses

AER507H, AER1304H, AER1315H, AER1415H,
CHE568H, CHE1053H, CHE1118H, CHE1123H, CHE1142H, CHE1143H,
CIV575H, CIV576H, CIV577H, CIV1303H, CIV1307H,
ECE533H, ECE1030H, ECE1055H, ECE1057H, ECE1059H, ECE1085H, ECE1086H, ECE1092H, ECE1094H, ECE1476H,
MIE516H, MIE517H, MIE1128H, MIE1129H, MIE1130H, MIE1240H, MIE1241H, MIE1715H,
MSE1023H, MSE1028H, MSE1058H.

Students who complete the requirements of the emphasis in Sustainable Energy will receive a notation on their transcript from the Faculty Graduate Studies Office following a recommendation from the Institute of Sustainable Energy. Contact: Mandeep Rayat.

Aerospace Studies
Aerospace Studies: Aerospace Science and Engineering: MEng

Master of Engineering

Program Description

The Master of Engineering (MEng) is a course-based program designed to lead to employment in the aerospace industry. Students select from the wide range of UTIAS courses, as well as courses offered by other University of Toronto departments, to create a personalized curriculum. Students can also opt to follow one of several emphases, which provide more concentrated teaching in a specific area, and which are recorded on the student's transcript.

The MEng program can be taken on a full-time, extended full-time, or part-time basis. Transfer between the full-time, extended full-time, and part-time options is not permitted after registration. The default registration is the extended full-time option.

 

Full-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy UTIAS's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor of applied science degree in engineering, or an equivalent four-year degree from a recognized undergraduate engineering program.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Completion of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (10 half courses) as follows:

    • A minimum of seven half courses (3.5 FCEs) must be technical.

    • A minimum of half the courses must be offered at UTIAS.

    • A maximum of three 500-level courses (1.5 FCEs) is permitted.

    • Students must achieve at least a B– average to be in good academic standing. Failure in any course taken for credit may result in termination of the student's registration.

    • Students deemed to have insufficient background may be required to complete supplementary coursework in addition to the required 5.0 FCEs. A maximum of 5.5 FCEs may be taken; permission must be granted by the graduate office to exceed 5.0 FCEs.

    • Students must complete all the required courses within three sessions (one year).

  • Once students are registered, transfer between the full-time, extended full-time, or part-time option is not permitted.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Advanced Manufacturing; Aerial Robotics; Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE); Robotics; Sustainable Aviation; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Aerospace Science and Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

3 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years

 

Extended Full-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants holding an appropriate bachelor of applied science degree in engineering are considered for admission under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.

  • An appropriate bachelor of applied science degree in engineering, or an equivalent four-year degree from a recognized undergraduate engineering program.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (10 half courses).

    • A minimum of seven half courses (3.5 FCEs) must be technical.

    • A minimum of half the courses must be offered at UTIAS.

    • A maximum of three 500-level courses (1.5 FCEs) is permitted.

    • A maximum of three half courses (1.5 FCEs) may be taken in any session.

    • A maximum of six half courses (3.0 FCEs) may be taken in any academic year.

    • Students must achieve at least a B– average to be in good academic standing. Failure in any course taken for credit may result in termination of the student's registration.

    • Students deemed to have insufficient background may be required to complete supplementary coursework in addition to the required 5.0 FCEs. A maximum of 5.5 FCEs may be taken; permission must be granted by the graduate office to exceed 5.0 FCEs.

    • Students must complete all the required courses within six sessions (two years).

  • Once students are registered, transfer between the full-time, extended full-time, or part-time option is not permitted.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Advanced Manufacturing; Aerial Robotics; Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE); Robotics; Sustainable Aviation; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Aerospace Science and Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

6 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years

 

Part-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy UTIAS's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor of applied science degree in engineering, or an equivalent four-year degree from a recognized undergraduate engineering program.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (10 half courses).

    • A minimum of seven half courses (3.5 FCEs) must be technical.

    • A minimum of half the courses must be offered at UTIAS.

    • A maximum of three 500-level courses (1.5 FCEs) is permitted.

    • A maximum of two half courses (1.0 FCE) may be taken in any session.

    • A maximum of four half courses (2.0 FCEs) may be taken in any academic year.

    • Students must achieve at least a B– average to be in good academic standing. Failure in any course taken for credit may result in termination of the student's registration.

    • Students deemed to have insufficient background may be required to complete supplementary coursework in addition to the required 5.0 FCEs. A maximum of 5.5 FCEs may be taken; permission must be granted by the graduate office to exceed 5.0 FCEs.

    • Students must complete all the required courses within nine sessions (three years).

  • Once students are registered, transfer between the full-time, extended full-time, or part-time option is not permitted.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Advanced Manufacturing; Aerial Robotics; Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE); Robotics; Sustainable Aviation; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Aerospace Science and Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

9 sessions

Time Limit

6 years

Coursework-only



Master of Engineering

Full-Time Option
Program Length: 3 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years

Extended Full-Time Option
Program Length: 6 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years

Part-Time Option
Program Length: 9 sessions
Time Limit: 6 years

Aerospace Studies
Aerospace Studies: Aerospace Science and Engineering: PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree is a research-based program leading to the production of a research thesis. Doctoral research at UTIAS is expected to be internationally recognized for its originality, rigour, and importance. Supervised by a faculty member, students select a research topic, develop a plan to address the topic, and implement this plan, leading to a major research thesis and contributions to the academic literature. This is the pinnacle of academic achievement, and holders of the PhD are well prepared for academic positions and leadership roles in industrial research and development.

Applicants may enter the PhD program via one of two routes: 1) following completion of an MASc degree in engineering, mathematics, physics, or chemistry; 2) transfer from the University of Toronto MASc program. The program can also be taken on a flexible-time basis.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy UTIAS’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An MASc degree in engineering, mathematics, physics, or chemistry and demonstrated ability to perform advanced research.

Program Requirements

  • Students must maintain full-time, continuous registration for every session, including the Summer session, until all degree requirements are completed.

    • Students starting with an MASc degree must spend a minimum of two years in the PhD program.

    • Students with an MASc in a discipline relevant to the field of PhD study are expected to complete the PhD program in less than four years.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (four half courses) in Years 1 and 2.

    • All courses must be technical.

    • At least half of the required FCEs must be courses offered at UTIAS.

    • Students must achieve at least a B– average to be in good academic standing. Failure in any course taken for credit may result in termination of the student's candidacy.

    • Students deemed to have insufficient background may be required to complete supplementary coursework in addition to the required 2.0 FCEs.

  • Students must complete the non-credit course JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE) (a half-day workshop).

  • Students must attend a total of 24 approved seminars.

  • Students undertake a program of research under the guidance of a Doctoral Examination Committee (DEC), which includes the student's supervisor and two other UTIAS professors. The DEC shall:

    • Ascertain the suitability of the student for advanced research

    • Assess the thesis topic

    • Conduct formal reviews of the student’s thesis progress at least once per year; unsatisfactory progress may result in the termination of the student’s registration)

    • Determine whether a student qualifies as a candidate for the PhD degree at the second DEC meeting (qualifying DEC), approximately 1.5 years after program start

    • Provide the first assessment of the PhD thesis.

  • Students must complete a thesis based upon research carried out during the period of registration for the PhD degree.

  • Students must present the thesis work at a seminar at the UTIAS Departmental Doctoral Seminar (DDS).

  • Students must defend the thesis at the Doctoral Final Oral Examination pursuant to the SGS Degree Regulations.

  • Students must prepare at least one formal manuscript for publication in a refereed journal or refereed conference proceedings.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Aerial Robotics; Robotics; Sustainable Aviation; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Aerospace Science and Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Transfer)

Transfer Requirements

  • Students who have achieved excellent performance in the MASc program at UTIAS at the end of Year 1 are recommended to transfer directly into the PhD program under the same supervisor. Approval for transfer is based on the student’s research ability, research progress during Year 1, and academic standing.

Program Requirements

  • Students must maintain full-time, continuous registration for every session, including the Summer session, until all degree requirements are completed.

    • Students transferring directly from the MASc program must spend a minimum of three years in the program from the date of initial MASc registration.

    • Students are expected to complete the PhD program in less than five years.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 2.5 FCEs already completed during the MASc program.

    • A minimum of 1.0 FCE (two half courses) in the PhD program.

    • At least half of the required FCEs must be courses offered at UTIAS.

    • Students must achieve at least a B– average to be in good academic standing. Failure in any course taken for credit may result in termination of the student's registration.

    • All required courses must be completed in the first two years of the program, starting from the initial registration in the MASc program.

  • Students must complete the non-credit course JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE) (a half-day workshop).

  • Students must attend a total of 24 approved seminars.

  • Students undertake a program of research under the guidance of a Doctoral Examination Committee (DEC), which includes the student's supervisor and two other UTIAS professors. The DEC shall:

    • Ascertain the suitability of the student for advanced research

    • Assess the thesis topic

    • Conduct formal reviews of the student’s thesis progress at least once per year; unsatisfactory progress may result in the termination of the student’s registration

    • Determine whether a student qualifies as a candidate for the PhD degree at the second DEC meeting (qualifying DEC), approximately 1.5 years after program start

    • Provide the first assessment of the PhD thesis.

  • Students must present the thesis work at the UTIAS Departmental Doctoral Seminar (DDS).

  • Students must defend the thesis at the Doctoral Final Oral Examination pursuant to the SGS Degree Regulations.

  • Students must prepare at least one formal manuscript for publication in a refereed journal or refereed conference proceedings.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Aerial Robotics; Robotics; Sustainable Aviation; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Aerospace Science and Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy UTIAS’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants must have a four-year undergraduate degree in engineering, mathematics, physics, or chemistry.

  • Applicants are expected to have achieved grades averaging the equivalent of a University of Toronto A– or better in their last full year of study.

Program Requirements

  • Students must maintain full-time, continuous registration for every session, including the Summer session, until all degree requirements are completed.

    • Students must spend a minimum of three years in the direct-entry PhD program.

    • Students are expected to complete the direct-entry PhD program in less than five years.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • At least half of the required FCEs must be courses with AER or ROB designators.

    • Students must achieve at least a B– average to be in good academic standing. Failure in any course taken for credit may result in termination of the student's candidacy.

    • All required courses must be completed in the first two years of the program.

    • All courses must be technical.

  • Students must complete the non-credit course JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE) (a half-day workshop).

  • Students must attend a total of 24 approved seminars.

  • Students must undertake a program of research under the guidance of a Doctoral Examination Committee (DEC), which includes the student's supervisor and two other UTIAS professors. The DEC shall:

    • Ascertain the suitability of the student for advanced research

    • Assess the thesis topic

    • Conduct formal reviews of the student’s thesis progress at least once per year; unsatisfactory progress may result in the termination of the student’s registration)

    • Determine whether a student qualifies as a candidate for the PhD degree at the second DEC meeting (qualifying DEC), approximately 1.5 years after program start

    • Provide the first assessment of the PhD thesis.

  • Students must present the thesis work at a seminar at the UTIAS Departmental Doctoral Seminar (DDS).

  • Students must defend the thesis at the Doctoral Final Oral Examination pursuant to the SGS Degree Regulations.

  • Students must prepare at least one formal manuscript for publication in a refereed journal or refereed conference proceedings.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Aerial Robotics; Robotics; Sustainable Aviation; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Aerospace Science and Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

 

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy UTIAS’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An MASc degree in engineering, mathematics, physics, or chemistry and demonstrated ability to perform advanced research.

Program Requirements

  • Students must maintain full-time, continuous registration for the first four years of study. Part-time registration is expected for the remaining period of study within the normal length.

    • Students starting with an MASc degree must spend a minimum of two years in the PhD program.

    • Students with an MASc in a discipline relevant to the field of PhD study are expected to complete the PhD program in less than six years.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (four half courses) in Years 1 and 2 as follows:

    • All courses must be technical.

    • At least half of the required FCEs must be courses offered at UTIAS.

    • Students must achieve at least a B– average to be in good academic standing. Failure in any course taken for credit may result in termination of the student's candidacy.

    • Students deemed to have insufficient background may be required to complete supplementary coursework in addition to the required 2.0 FCEs.

  • Students must complete the non-credit course JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE) (a half-day workshop).

  • Students must attend a total of 24 approved seminars.

  • Students undertake a program of research under the guidance of a Doctoral Examination Committee (DEC), which includes the student's supervisor and two other UTIAS professors. The DEC shall:

    • Ascertain the suitability of the student for advanced research

    • Assess the thesis topic

    • Conduct formal reviews of the student’s thesis progress at least once per year; unsatisfactory progress may result in the termination of the student’s registration)

    • Determine whether a student qualifies as a candidate for the PhD degree at the second DEC meeting (qualifying DEC), approximately 24 months after program start

    • Provide the first assessment of the PhD thesis.

  • Students must complete a thesis based upon research carried out during the period of registration for the PhD degree.

  • Students must present the thesis work at a seminar at the UTIAS Departmental Doctoral Seminar (DDS).

  • Students must defend the thesis at the Doctoral Final Oral Examination pursuant to the SGS Degree Regulations.

  • Students must prepare at least one formal manuscript for publication in a refereed journal or refereed conference proceedings.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Aerial Robotics; Robotics; Sustainable Aviation; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Aerospace Science and Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

6 years

Time Limit

8 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Transfer)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)
Program Length: 6 years
Time Limit: 8 years

Aerospace Studies
Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course: Courses

Core Courses for Option 1: Aging and the Life Course

Master's Level

Course Code Course Title
AGE2000H
Principles of Aging

Doctoral Level

Course Code Course Title
AGE3000H
Advanced Research Seminar in Aging and the Life Course
(AGE2000H is a prerequisite for entry into the doctoral level of the collaborative specialization)

Core Courses for Option 2: Palliative and Supportive Care

Master's Level

Course Code Course Title
AGE1000H
Multidisciplinary Research Concepts in Palliative and Supportive Care

Doctoral Level

Course Code Course Title
AGE1500H
Advanced Research Methodologies in Palliative and Supportive Care
(AGE1000H is a prerequisite for entry into the doctoral level of the collaborative specialization)

Elective Courses for Option 1 or 2

Special topics courses can be taken as part of the program requirements of this collaborative specialization. Students must check their home graduate unit's website for course availability in any given session.

Course Code Course Title
DEN1003H
Preventive Dentistry
NUR1057H
Interventions to Enhance Health, Abilities, and Well-Being
SLP1533Y
Aphasia
SLP1534H
Motor Speech Disorders
SOC6707H
Intermediate Data Analysis
SWK4614H
Social Work Practice in Palliative Care (social work students only)
SWK4618H
Special Issues in Gerontological Social Work
SWK4634H
Family Practice Across the Life Cycle
SWK4641H
Special Topics in Social Work in Gerontology
SWK4803H
Special Studies III

Requests to approve other courses as equivalent to fulfil collaborative specialization requirements may be made to the collaborative specialization committee. Students taking either option may choose the master's core course in the other option as an elective.

Additional Electives for Option 2 Only

Course Code Course Title
HAD5301H
Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology and Health Care Research
HAD5730H
Economic Evaluation Methods for Health Service Research
HAD5771H
Resource Allocation Ethics
MSC1090H
Introduction to Computational Biostatistics with R
NUR1021H
Nursing Ethics
NUR1024H
Foundations of Qualitative Inquiry
NUR1025H
Doing Qualitative Research: Design and Data Collection
NUR1045H
Theories of Pain: Impact on the Individual, Family, and Society
NUR1046H
Persistent Illness: Theoretical, Research, and Practice Implications
NUR1050H
Coping With Illness
PHL2145H
Bioethics
PHL2146Y
Topics in Bioethics
Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course (Collaborative Specialization)
Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course: Doctoral Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants must apply to a participating graduate unit and comply with the admission procedures of that unit.

  • Applicants may apply concurrently to their participating graduate unit and to the Collaborative Specialization in Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course.

  • Applicants must forward the following to the collaborative specialization committee:

    • A copy of the School of Graduate Studies application form submitted to the participating graduate unit.

    • Copies of official undergraduate and graduate transcripts from all institutions previously or currently attended.

    • A resumé or curriculum vitae (CV).

    • A letter explaining how their course of study and specific research interests relate to either option 1 in aging and the life course, or option 2 in palliative and supportive care at the graduate level.

    • Two letters of reference.

  • Students may use copies of official documents (i.e., application form and transcripts) for their application to the Collaborative Specialization in Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course. These may be obtained from the participating home graduate unit.

Specialization Requirements

  • In addition to meeting the program requirements of their home graduate unit, students will be required to complete both the master's- and doctoral-level core courses (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE] each) and one elective course (0.5 FCE) for either of the two options. The master's-level course must be completed before enrolling in the doctoral-level course.

  • It is expected that the student's thesis or practicum (whichever is included in his or her program of study) would be in his or her chosen study areas (i.e., in either aging and the life course or palliative and supportive care).

Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course (Collaborative Specialization)
Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course: Master's Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants must apply to a participating graduate unit and comply with the admission procedures of that unit. Applicants may apply concurrently to their participating graduate unit and to the Collaborative Specialization in Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course.

  • Applicants must forward the following to the committee of the Collaborative Specialization in Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course:

    • a. A copy of the School of Graduate Studies application form submitted to the participating graduate unit.

    • b. Copies of official undergraduate and graduate transcripts from all institutions previously or currently attended.

    • c. A resumé or curriculum vitae (CV).

    • d. A letter explaining how their course of study and specific research interests relate to either option 1 in aging and the life course, or option 2 in palliative and supportive care at the graduate level.

  • Students may use copies of official documents (a. and b. above) for their application to the Collaborative Specialization in Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course. These may be obtained from their home participating graduate unit.

Specialization Requirements

MA in Adult Education and Community Development; MA and MSc in Anthropology; MA in Counselling and Clinical Psychology; MEd in Counselling Psychology; MSc in Dentistry; MHSc in Health Administration; MSc in Health Policy, Management and Evaluation; Master of Information (Thesis and Co-op Options); MSc in Kinesiology; MSc in Medical Science; MA in Music; Master of Nursing Science; MSc in Pharmaceutical Sciences; MA in Psychology; Master of Public Health; MSc in Rehabilitation Science; Master of Social Work; MA in Sociology; MSc in Speech-Language Pathology; MA in Women and Gender Studies

In addition to meeting the program requirements of their home graduate unit, students must complete:

  • The core course (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]) for the chosen option (i.e., aging and the life course or palliative and supportive care).

  • One elective course (0.5 FCE) from a) the chosen option's pre-approved elective list or b) the student's home graduate unit list of courses and/or other graduate-level elective courses, provided the focus of the student’s assignments is in the area of this specialization (aging or palliative) and the course is approved by the specialization committee as a suitable elective.

  • The major research paper, thesis, or practicum in the participating degree program will be on a topic in the chosen option of this specialization .

 

Specialization Requirements

Master of Information (Coursework-Only Option)

In addition to meeting the program requirements of their home graduate unit, students must complete:

  • The core course (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]) for the chosen option (i.e., aging and the life course or palliative and supportive care).

  • Four elective courses (2.0 FCEs), one of which can be a practicum course, from a) the chosen option's pre-approved elective list or b) the student's home graduate unit list of courses and/or graduate-level elective courses, where the topic of the major paper or practicum field is in the area of the chosen specialization (aging or palliative). Courses not on the pre-approved list must be approved by the collaborative specialization director and/or committee, after consultation with the Information faculty member associated with the collaborative specialization and, as needed, the course instructor, to count towards the collaborative specialization requirements.

 

Specialization Requirements

MEd in Adult Education and Community Development

In addition to meeting the program requirements of their home graduate unit, students must complete:

  • The core course (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]) for the chosen option (i.e., aging and the life course or palliative and supportive care).

  • Two elective courses (1.0 FCE) from a) the chosen option's pre-approved elective list or b) the student's home graduate unit list of courses and/or other graduate-level courses, provided the focus of the student’s assignments is in the area of this specialization (aging or palliative) and the course is approved by the specialization committee as a suitable elective.

Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course (Collaborative Specialization)
Ancient and Medieval Philosophy: Courses

Required Course

AMP2000Y Collaborative Specialization in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (CSAMP) Proseminar (Credit/No Credit)

Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Collaborative Specialization)
Ancient and Medieval Philosophy: Doctoral Level

Admission Requirements

  • All applicants must meet the admission criteria of the unit through which they wish to enrol.

Specialization Requirements

  • Students must fulfil the normal requirements of the PhD in their home unit.

  • Students will normally concentrate in either ancient or medieval philosophy, though it is not necessary to indicate such specialization formally. Their plan of study must also be approved by the collaborative specialization committee and must include the following elements:

    • 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) in some area of philosophy other than the history of philosophy.

    • Successful completion of the proseminar (AMP2000Y).

    • A language competence examination at the appropriate level (in at least one of Greek, Classical or Medieval Latin, or Arabic, as relevant) consisting of unseen translation must be successfully completed before the major field or area examinations are first attempted.

    • Area, qualifying, or major field examinations must contain a paper involving translation from at least one of Greek, Classical or Medieval Latin, or Arabic (as appropriate to the area or field). This examination will be based on a substantial list of texts relevant to the field or area.

    • A reading knowledge of two modern languages other than English.

  • In most cases, some of these elements will be fulfilled by program requirements in the doctoral program of the home unit.

Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Collaborative Specialization)
Anthropology: Anthropology MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

The department offers a Master of Arts degree program, both full-time and part-time. The full-time option normally extends over a 12-month period lasting from September to September.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Anthropology’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • B+ average or equivalent.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they have the appropriate background to enter a particular program of graduate study.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • A brief statement of interest (not exceeding 1,000 words).

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • 0.5 FCE: ANT3047H or ANT4010H or ANT6100H

    • 1.0 FCE: ANT2000Y

    • 2.0 FCEs, of which at least 1.0 FCE must be in Anthropology

    • Exceptions to coursework requirements must be approved by the advisor and Graduate Coordinator.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S);
6 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework-only



Master of Arts
Program Length: 3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S); 6 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time


 
Anthropology
Anthropology: Anthropology MA, MSc, PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Check with the department for the current year’s offerings.

General

Course Code Course Title
ANT1096H
Quantitative Methods I
ANT1099H
Quantitative Methods II
ANT1155H,Y+
Research (or reading seminar)
ANT1156H,Y+
Research (or reading seminar)
ANT1157H,Y+
Research (or reading seminar)
ANT1158H,Y+
Research (or reading seminar)
ANT2000Y0
MA Research Paper
ANT2500Y0
MSc Research Paper
EIP3000H
Coordinating Seminar: Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies (for students in the Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies collaborative specialization)

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Archaeology

Course Code Course Title
JPA1040Y
Advanced Physics and Archaeology
ANT4010H
Archaeology in Contemporary Society
ANT4020H
Archaeology Theory
ANT4025H
Archaeology of Eastern North America
ANT4026H
Arctic Archaeology
ANT4030H
Artifacts
ANT4038H
Archaeology of Urban Development
ANT4039H
Origin and Nature of Food Producing Societies
ANT4040H
Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers
ANT4041H
Landscape Archaeology
ANT4042H
Archaeology of Complex Hunter-Gatherers
ANT4043H
Archaeology of Ritual, Religion, and Ideology
ANT4044H
Interregional Interaction in the Ancient World
ANT4050H
Zooarchaeology
ANT4051H
Archaeology and Climate Change
ANT4059H
Anthropological Understanding of Cultural Transmission
ANT4060H
Specific Problems: Old World
ANT4065H
Specific Problems: New World
ANT4066H
Household Archaeology
ANT4068H
Archaeology of Technology
ANT4069H
Writing Archaeology
ANT4070H
Archaeologies of Place, Urbanism, and Infrastructures

Evolutionary Anthropology

Course Code Course Title
ANT3005H
Advanced Topics in Paleoanthropology
ANT3010H
Human Osteology: Theory and Practice
ANT3011H
Palaeopathology
ANT3031H,Y
Advanced Research Seminar I
ANT3032H,Y Advanced Research Seminar II
ANT3033H,Y Advanced Research Seminar III
ANT3034H,Y+
Advanced Research Seminar IV
ANT3041H
Evolutionary Perspectives on Growth and Development
ANT3042H
Advanced Topics in Primate Ecology
ANT3046H
Paleoecology in Primate and Human Evolution
ANT3047H
Evolutionary Anthropology Theory
ANT3048H
Primatological Theory and Methods
ANT3049H
Advanced Seminar in Evolutionary Morphology (prerequisite: ANT3047H)
ANT3050H
Species Concepts and Human Evolution
ANT3439H
Advanced Seminar in Forensic Anthropology
ANT3440H
Molecular Anthropology: Theory and Practice

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Linguistic and Semiotic Anthropology

Course Code Course Title
ANT5144H
Foundations in Linguistic Anthropology
ANT5150H
Nation, State, and Language in Francophone Canada
ANT5151H
Metaphor, Language, and Science
JSA5147H
Language, Nationalism, and Post-Nationalism

Medical Anthropology

Course Code Course Title
ANT7001H
Medical Anthropology I
ANT7002H
Medical Anthropology II

Sociocultural Anthropology

Course Code Course Title
ANT6003H
Critical Issues in Ethnography I
ANT6004H
Critical Issues in Ethnography II
ANT6006H
Genealogies of Anthropological Thought
ANT6014H
Media and Mediation
ANT6017H
Post-colonial Science Studies and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge Translation
ANT6018H
Approaches to Nature and Culture
ANT6019H
Anthropology of Neoliberalism
ANT6021H
Political Anthropology: State, Power, and Sovereignty
ANT6027H
Anthropology of Violence
ANT6029H
Anthropology of Capitalism
ANT6030H
Anthropology and the Ethical Imagination
ANT6031H,Y
Advanced Research Seminar I
ANT6032H
Advanced Research Seminar II
ANT6032Y
Advanced Research Seminar
ANT6033H,Y
Advanced Research Seminar III
ANT6034H,Y
Advanced Research Seminar IV
ANT6035H
Advanced Research Seminar
ANT6036H
Advanced Research Seminar
ANT6037H,Y
Advanced Research Seminar VII
ANT6038H,Y+
Advanced Research Seminar VIII
ANT6040H
Research Design and Fieldwork Methods
ANT6055H
Anthropology of Subjectivity and Personhood
ANT6057H
Anthropology and Literature
ANT6058H
Anthropology of Normativity
ANT6059H
Anthropology and History
ANT6060H
Anthropology and Indigenous Studies in North America
ANT6061H
Anthropology of Sexuality and Gender
ANT6062H Disability Anthropology
ANT6063H Anthropology of Infrastructures
ANT6064H Evidence and Uncertainty: The Politics of Law and Science
ANT6065H Anthropology in/of Troubled Times
ANT6066H More-than-Human Ethnography
ANT6100H
History of Anthropological Thought
ANT6150H
Proposing Ethnographic Research
ANT6200H
Ethnographic Practicum

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Joint Courses

Course Code Course Title
JAL1145H Field Methods
JAR1001H Anthropology of Religion Gateway Seminar
Anthropology
Anthropology: Anthropology MSc

Master of Science

Program Description

The MSc program is most appropriate for students who are considering careers in consulting archaeology, some aspects of medical or forensic anthropology, NGO work, or application to PhD programs in Anthropology at other Canadian universities.

The full-time two-year program is normally completed by the summer of Year 2. The MSc program can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Anthropology’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • B+ average or equivalent.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they have the appropriate background to enter a particular program of graduate study.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • A brief statement of interest (not exceeding 1,000 words).

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 4.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • 0.5 FCE: ANT3047H or ANT4010H or ANT6100H

    • 1.0 FCE: ANT2500Y

    • 3.0 FCEs, of which 1.5 FCEs will normally be science courses in archaeology, evolutionary anthropology, medical anthropology, or related disciplines depending on the student's program

    • Exceptions to coursework requirements must be approved by the advisor and Graduate Coordinator.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S);
9 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework-only



Master of Science
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S); 9 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time


 
Anthropology
Anthropology: Anthropology PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The Doctor of Philosophy is primarily a research degree. A program of study is designed for each student to ensure competence in a field of research, culminating in the writing of a thesis.

Applicants may enter the PhD program via one of two routes: 1) following completion of an appropriate master’s degree or 2) direct entry after completing a bachelor’s degree.

Depending on subfield or area of research, completion of the PhD may take longer than the indicated program length below. See the departmental handbook for details.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Anthropology’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Admission is offered primarily to excellent students who, by the time of enrolment, have completed a master’s degree in anthropology (or a cognate subject).

  • All applicants are expected to have achieved grades averaging the equivalent of a University of Toronto A– or better in their last full year of study. Most successful applicants will have finished or be in the process of completing an MA or MSc.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they have the appropriate background to enter a particular program of graduate study.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • A brief statement of interest (not exceeding 1,000 words).

  • Applicants are required to identify departmental members with whom they want to conduct PhD research. The department regrets that it cannot admit students to the PhD program, regardless of their qualifications, unless a supervisor is available.

  • Undergraduate students with strong backgrounds in anthropology or relevant disciplines (grade point average of 3.70 or above in their last 5.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) and who have earned an appropriate bachelor’s degree with a concentration in anthropology or a cognate discipline may apply directly for admission to the PhD program.

Program Requirements

  • At the beginning of the academic year, each student will submit, with the SGS enrolment form, a program statement describing his or her plan to meet program requirements.

  • A minimum of 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs), of which at least 1.5 FCEs are normally in anthropology.

  • Attain at least an A– average in coursework to continue in the PhD program in good standing.

  • Submit research proposal by the end of the second session of Year 2 (for example, May 1 for students who start in September).

  • Before proceeding to full-time research (achieving candidacy), students must:

    • Be resident on campus for one year.

    • Complete the minimum of 3.0 FCEs (noted above), of which at least 1.5 FCEs are normally in anthropology.

    • Gain experience in research methods and design; requirement can be filled by completing coursework in methodology or, with the department’s assent, undertaking faculty-supervised fieldwork or laboratory research. Each student will normally be involved in fieldwork, in the broad meaning of the term, and in theoretical analysis.

    • Present and defend a thesis proposal.

    • Demonstrate an adequate knowledge of at least one language other than English, unless their program of study requires the intensive and time-consuming mastery of another research tool; demonstration of adequate language or equivalent knowledge can be accomplished in a variety of ways, a list of which is available in the Department of Anthropology’s Graduate Student Handbook.

    • An approved Ethics Protocol for all students working with living organisms and modern human remains.

Program Length

4 years

Although the program has been designed for completion in four years, some students may require a longer period to complete all of the requirements.

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Anthropology’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Undergraduate students with strong backgrounds in anthropology or relevant disciplines (grade point average of 3.70 or above in their last 5.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) and who have earned an appropriate bachelor’s degree with a concentration in anthropology or a cognate discipline may apply directly for admission to the PhD program.

  • All applicants are expected to have achieved grades averaging the equivalent of a University of Toronto A– or better in their last full year of study.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they have the appropriate background to enter a particular program of graduate study.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • A brief statement of interest (not exceeding 1,000 words).

  • Applicants are required to identify departmental members with whom they want to conduct PhD research. The department regrets that it cannot admit students to the PhD program, regardless of their qualifications, unless a supervisor is available.

Program Requirements

  • At the beginning of the academic year, each student will submit, with the SGS enrolment form, a program statement describing his or her plan to meet program requirements.

  • Students must complete 5.0 graduate full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 3.0 FCEs, normally taken in Year 1

    • 2.0 FCEs taken in Year 2, when work on the research proposal is also expected to begin.

  • Attain an annual average of at least A– to continue in the PhD program in good standing.

  • Submit research proposal by the end of the second session of Year 3 (for example, May 1 for students who start in September).

  • Before proceeding to full-time research (achieving candidacy), students must:

    • Be resident on campus for one year.

    • Complete the minimum 5.0 FCEs (noted above), of which at least 2.5 FCEs are normally in anthropology.

    • Gain experience in research methods and design; requirement can be filled by completing coursework in methodology or, with the department’s assent, undertaking faculty-supervised fieldwork or laboratory research. Each student will normally be involved in fieldwork, in the broad meaning of the term, and in theoretical analysis.

    • Present and defend a thesis proposal.

    • Demonstrate an adequate knowledge of at least one language other than English, unless their program of study requires the intensive and time-consuming mastery of another research tool; demonstration of adequate language or equivalent knowledge can be accomplished in a variety of ways, a list of which is available in the Department of Anthropology’s Graduate Student Handbook.

    • An approved Ethics Protocol for all students working with living organisms and modern human remains.

Program Length

5 years

Although the program has been designed for completion in five years, some students may require a longer period to complete all of the requirements.

Time Limit

7 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

 

Anthropology
APHD: Child Study and Education EdD

Doctor of Education

Program Description

This professional doctorate is designed to prepare professionals working in the field of education (or a highly related area) to extend their professional knowledge and practice to further develop their ability to be scholar-practitioners within child study. This program aims to provide practitioners with an advanced degree to enable them to engage in innovation, advanced professional practice, and understand how the field of child study can inform decision making in multiple contexts including the classroom.

This degree is designed for practitioners who are working within contexts in which children are served or supported and/or with individuals who support or guide those who work with children (for example, parents, families, and teachers).

The Doctor of Education (EdD) program is only available on a full-time basis.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the additional admission requirements of the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development stated below. Please note that applicants will be accepted into this degree program every other year.

  • A master’s degree: an MA or MEd degree in Education (for example, Master of Arts in Child Study and Education, Master of Education degree, Master of Teaching degree) with high academic standing (equivalent to a B+ or better) from a recognized university. Applicants with master’s degrees in other disciplines may be eligible to apply for admission, but may have to complete additional courses in developmental psychology and/or child study.

  • Letter of Intent: applicants must submit a well-written letter of intent in which they highlight their research interests, provide some insight into the problem of practice they are currently wishing to address, and describe their professional experiences and how these relate to their research interests and proposed problem of practice.

  • Normally applicants will have in-depth work experience (i.e., normally a minimum of 3 years of current or recent work experience) in an education-related field within a school or community setting. They should be able to identify how their work environment would be able to support and facilitate their research related to their problem of practice, which is a major outcome of this degree.

  • A letter from an employer supporting the potential candidate’s goals and ability to conduct their applied research within the school or community setting is required.

  • Applicants who hold an MEd or other non-thesis master’s degree must submit evidence of their ability to identify a research question or problem, to design and conduct a research study or project, and to report the findings or results, all in a rigorous manner. This constitutes a Qualifying Research Paper (QRP) or Major Research Paper (MRP). Applicants who do not have a QRP or MRP must provide a writing sample that highlights their ability to write clearly and analytically about issues in education and/or child study. Examples include a single authored master’s-level course paper, a policy document, or a professional publication.

  • An interview may be required prior to admission.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • APD3301H Issues in Child Study and Education: Research, Policy, and Problems of Practice (RM) (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3302H Advanced Study of Critical Issues in Special Education, Mental Health, and Child Security (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3303H Advanced Study of Tools and Research Methods for Investigating Problems of Practice: Data-Driven Research for Decision-Making (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3304H Research Proposal Development (RM) (0.5 FCE).

    • Two half courses (1.0 FCE) from one of the three emphases: 1) Early Learning and Early Years; 2) Mental Health and Wellbeing; or 3) Special Education. See details on each emphasis below.

    • Research Methods course (select from the list of available research methods courses) (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3305H Systems and Organizational Change (0.5 FCE).

  • Students will have successfully reached candidacy once their thesis committee is formed and formal approval of the thesis proposal has been given by the committee.

  • The thesis (Dissertation in Practice) is the culminating component of the Doctor of Education degree in Child Study and Education that shall include an identification and investigation of a problem of practice, the application of theory and research to problems of practice and/or policy and a design for implementation of ideas arising. Specifically, the thesis (Dissertation in Practice) consists of original research in the form of a written proposal or plan for innovative and impactful educational policy, guideline, advocacy, development project, or activism within an education-related field, aimed at improving practice at local, regional, national, or international levels.

  • Students are full-time and must maintain continuous, full-time registration and pay full-time fees until all degree requirements, including the thesis (Dissertation in Practice), are completed.

  • Students cannot transfer between the EdD and PhD programs.

Program Length

4 years full-time

Time Limit

6 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Education
Program Length: 4 years full-time
Time Limit: 6 years

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Child Study and Education EdD Courses
Course Code Course Title
APD3201H Qualitative Research Methods in Human Development and Applied Psychology (RM)
APD3202H A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM)
APD3301H
Issues in Child Study and Education: Research, Policy, and Problems of Practice (RM)
APD3302H
Advanced Study of Critical Issues in Special Education, Mental Health, and Child Security
(Prerequisite: APD3301H.)
APD3303H
Advanced Study of Tools and Research Methods for Investigating Problems of Practice: Data-Driven Research for Decision-Making
APD3304H
Research Proposal Development (RM)
APD3305H Systems and Organizational Change
JOI1288H Intermediate Statistics and Research Design (RM)
JOI3228H Mixed Methods Research Design in Social Sciences (RM)
Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Child Study and Education EdD Emphases

Emphasis: Early Learning and Early Years

This emphasis will allow students to take specialized courses which address social emotional wellbeing in the early years. This emphasis is designed to help students gain a deeper understanding and expertise in early learning and early years while also integrating their knowledge and understanding of special education, security, and child and youth wellbeing.

  • Coursework. From the following course list, EdD students must successfully complete 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE), which is counted towards the total FCEs required for the student's degree program:

    • APD1211H, APD1249H, APD1272H, APD1280H, APD1286H, APD1299H, APD3273H.

Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and degree requirements, students may make a request to the CSE Program Administrator to have the emphasis noted on the student transcript. This request must be made before graduation. A course can only be applied to the requirements of a single emphasis.

 

Emphasis: Mental Health and Wellbeing

This emphasis will allow students to take specialized courses which address the mental health of children and/or youth in various settings including the classroom as well as delve into issues of risk and resilience and culture. This emphasis is designed to help students gain a deeper understanding of and expertise in special education, security, and child and youth wellbeing.

  • Coursework. From the following course list, EdD students must successfully complete 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE), which is counted towards the total FCEs required for the student's degree program:

    • APD1236H, APD1256H, APD1279H, APD1295H, APD1297H, APD3221H.

Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and degree requirements, students may make a request to the CSE Program Administrator to have the emphasis noted on the student transcript. This request must be made before graduation. A course can only be applied to the requirements of a single emphasis.

 

Emphasis: Special Education

This emphasis will allow students to take specialized courses that delve into specific domains of special education. This emphasis is designed to help students gain a deeper understanding of and expertise in special education while also considering issues pertaining to security and child and youth wellbeing.

  • Coursework. From the following course list, EdD students must successfully complete 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE), which is counted towards the total FCEs required for the student's degree program:

    • APD1271H, APD1285H, APD1296H, APD2275H, APD2296H.

Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and degree requirements, students may make a request to the CSE Program Administrator to have the emphasis noted on the student transcript. This request must be made before graduation. A course can only be applied to the requirements of a single emphasis.

Coursework plus thesis



 

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Child Study and Education MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

The Master of Arts in Child Study and Education Program is offered at the Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study, a centre of professional teacher training and research in childhood and education, which includes a Nursery through Grade 6 Laboratory School.

The philosophy of this program is based on the belief that successful teaching requires an understanding of how children’s capacities, concerns, and behaviour change with age, how individual differences reflect developmental changes, and how social and physical environments influence children’s development.

The program introduces students to educational and developmental theory and research relevant to educational settings, showing how this research can inform classroom practice. Students also learn how to objectively study children, using both practical assessment and formal methods of inquiry. These areas of knowledge combined with knowledge of effective teaching methods (such as an inquiry-based approach) and learning environments result in educational practices that build on children’s current levels of development.

The non-thesis program requires two years of full-time study leading to a Master of Arts degree. Graduates are recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for a Certificate of Qualification, which qualifies the holder to teach in the primary and junior divisions (junior kindergarten to grade 6) of Ontario schools. Research is embedded throughout the courses and the program.

This program offers two fields:

  • Practice-Based Inquiry (PBI) in Psychology and Educational Practice

  • Research-Intensive Training (RIT) in Psychology and Education (admissions have been administratively suspended)

 

Field: Practice-Based Inquiry (PBI) in Psychology and Educational Practice

The Practice-Based Inquiry (PBI) in Psychology and Educational Practice field of study is for those who wish to become classroom teachers and acquire the skills to continuously grow, improve, and lead. The field is based on the use of collaborative inquiry and data-based decision making to enhance teachers’ practice and student learning and success (working cooperatively with colleagues and using data and research findings to meet student needs). This field will provide a foundation in the use of a broad range of information sources to address questions of practice using an inquiry cycle.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree (usually a four-year degree) with the equivalent of a University of Toronto mid-B or better in the final year.

  • Applicants are also expected to have experience working with groups of children, preferably in responsible positions.

  • Normally, an interview is required prior to admission.

  • A satisfactory vulnerable sector screening (VSS) police check is required prior to having direct contact with students. Without proof of a satisfactory VSS, schools will not allow teacher education candidates to participate in practice teaching.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 11.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including practicum placements and an internship as follows:

    • Year 1 — 7.0 FCEs as follows:

      • APD2200Y Child Study: ‪Observation, Evaluation, Reporting, and Research‬ (1.0 FCE).

      • APD2201Y Childhood Education Seminar I (1.0 FCE).

      • APD2210Y Introduction to Curriculum I: Core Areas (1.0 FCE).

      • APD2220Y Teaching Practicum (1.0 FCE): three eight-week, half-day placements in kindergarten, grades 1 to 3, and grades 4 to 6.

      • APD2270Y Introduction to Special Education and Adaptive Instruction (1.0 FCE).

      • APD1226H Foundations in Inquiry and Data-Based Decision Making (0.5 FCE).

      • 1.5 elective FCEs (equivalent to three half courses) chosen from among master's-level courses in the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development and, in some cases, other departments; to be completed during the Spring (May/June) and Summer (July/August) sessions.

      • Students without an undergraduate course in child development must take APD1201H Child and Adolescent Development (0.5 FCE) as an elective.

      • Registration in Year 2 of the program is contingent upon successful completion of all Year 1 work.

    • Year 2 — 4.0 FCEs as follows:

      • APD2211H Theory and Curriculum I: Language and Literacy (0.5 FCE).

      • APD2212H Theory and Curriculum II: Mathematics (0.5 FCE).

      • APD2214H Curriculum and Pedagogies for Cross-Curricular Teaching (0.5 FCE).

      • APD2221Y Advanced Teaching Practicum (1.0 FCE), a 12-week full-time internship to be taken in one session.

      • APD2222H Professional Practice Project: Role A (0.5 FCE), taken during the internship session of Year 2.

      • APD2223H Professional Practice Project: Role B (0.5 FCE), taken during the academic session of Year 2.

      • APD2202H Childhood Education Seminar II: Advanced Teaching (0.5 FCE), taken during the internship session of Year 2.

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

 

Field: Research-Intensive Training (RIT) in Psychology and Education

Admissions to this field have been administratively suspended.

The field provides concurrent training in research methods and educational practice for elementary teacher certification, including extensive practicum in classrooms. It supports the development of expertise in scientific examination of educational and psychological issues and highlights the integration between science and classroom practice. RIT students must complete a Major Research Paper (MRP) by April of Year 2 in order to graduate.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree (usually a four-year degree) with the equivalent of a University of Toronto mid-B or better in the final year.

  • Applicants are also expected to have strong research experience and experience working with groups of children, preferably in responsible positions.

  • Normally, an interview is required prior to admission.

  • A satisfactory vulnerable sector screening (VSS) police check is required prior to having direct contact with students. Without proof of a satisfactory VSS, schools will not allow teacher education candidates to participate in practice teaching.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 11.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including practicum placements and an internship as follows (although a thesis paper is not required, students must complete a Major Research Paper):

    • Year 1 — 7.0 FCEs as follows:

      • APD2200Y Child Study: ‪Observation, Evaluation, Reporting, and Research‬ (1.0 FCE).

      • APD2201Y Childhood Education Seminar I (1.0 FCE).

      • APD2210Y Introduction to Curriculum I: Core Areas (1.0 FCE).

      • APD2220Y Teaching Practicum (1.0 FCE): three eight-week, half-day placements in kindergarten, grades 1 to 3, and grades 4 to 6.

      • APD2270Y Introduction to Special Education and Adaptive Instruction (1.0 FCE).

      • APD1209H Research Methods and Thesis Preparation in AP&HD (0.5 FCE).

      • 1.5 elective FCEs (equivalent to three half courses) chosen from among master's-level courses in the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development and, in some cases, other departments; to be completed during the Spring (May/June) and Summer (July/August) sessions.

      • Students without an undergraduate course in child development must take APD1201H Child and Adolescent Development (0.5 FCE) as an elective.

      • Registration in Year 2 of the program is contingent upon successful completion of all Year 1 work.

    • Year 2 — 4.0 FCEs as follows:

      • APD2211H Theory and Curriculum I: Language and Literacy (0.5 FCE).

      • APD2212H Theory and Curriculum II: Mathematics (0.5 FCE).

      • APD2214H Curriculum and Pedagogies for Cross-Curricular Teaching (0.5 FCE).

      • APD2221Y Advanced Teaching Practicum (1.0 FCE), a 12-week full-time internship to be taken in one session.

      • APD2001Y0 Major Research Paper (1.0 FCE).

      • APD2202H Childhood Education Seminar II: Advanced Teaching (0.5 FCE), taken during the internship session of Year 2.

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework-only



Master of Arts

Field: Practice-Based Inquiry (PBI) in Psychology and Education Practice
Program Length: 5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Field: Research-Intensive Training (RIT) in Psychology and Education
Program Length: 5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Child Study and Education MA Courses

Year 1 Required Courses

Course Code Course Title
APD2200Y
Child Study: Observation, Evaluation, Reporting, and Research
APD2201Y
Childhood Education Seminar I
APD2210Y
Introduction to Curriculum I: Core Areas
APD2220Y
Teaching Practicum
APD2270Y
Introduction to Special Education and Adaptive Instruction
Plus
PBI field only: APD1226H Foundations in Inquiry and Data-Based Decision Making
or
RIT field only: APD1209H Research Methods and Thesis Preparation in AP&HD
Plus
Three elective half courses to be completed during the Spring/Summer session.
Plus
Full-year religious education course (if interested in teaching in the Roman Catholic separate school board). This course does not count towards the Child Study and Education program requirements. There is a separate fee. Students interested in this option should contact the OISE Continuing and Professional Learning Office for course enrolment information.

Note: Students without an undergraduate course credit in child development must take APD1201H Child and Adolescent Development as one of their electives.

Year 2 Required Courses

Registration in Year 2 is contingent upon successful completion of all Year 1 work.

Academic Session

Course Code Course Title
APD2211H
Theory and Curriculum I: Language and Literacy
APD2212H
Theory and Curriculum II: Mathematics
APD2214H
Curriculum and Pedagogies for Cross-Curricular Teaching
(Prerequisite: APD2210Y.)
Plus
PBI field only: APD2222H Professional Practice Project: Role A and APD2223H Professional Practice Project: Role B
or
RIT field only: APD2001Y0 Major Research Paper

Internship Session

Course Code Course Title
APD2202H
Childhood Education Seminar II: Advanced Teaching
APD2221Y
Advanced Teaching Practicum

In addition, students must demonstrate knowledge of the Acts and Regulations respecting education in Ontario (addressed in APD2202H).

Recommended Elective Courses

Depending on their career goals, students may wish to select courses and placements to focus on particular areas:

Special Education

Students planning a career in special needs education may consider Special Education as a focused area of study. Such students are strongly encouraged to complete two recommended Special Education electives beyond their core foundation course (APD2270Y).

Early Childhood

Students interested in kindergarten programs may consider Early Childhood as a focused area of study. Such students are strongly encouraged to complete one or more recommended Early Childhood elective course plus an internship in a kindergarten class.

Course List

Not all courses are offered every year. Please review the course schedule on the Registrar’s Office and Student Experience website.

Course Code Course Title
APD1201H
Child and Adolescent Development
APD1209H
Research Methods and Thesis Preparation in AP&HD
APD1211H
Psychological Foundations of Early Development and Education
APD1217H
Foundations of Proactive Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention in Children
APD1226H
Foundations in Inquiry and Data-Based Decision Making
APD1249H Social-Emotional Development and Applications
APD1256H
Child Abuse: Intervention and Prevention
APD1271H Perspectives on Executive Functions in Education: From Theory to Practice
APD1272H
Play and Education
APD1280H Symbolic Development and Learning
APD1286H Foundations of Literacy Development for School Age Children
APD1294H
Technology, Psychology, and Play
APD1296H
Assessing School-Aged Language Learners
APD1298H Imagination, Reasoning, and Learning
APD1299H Language Acquisition and Development in Early Childhood
APD2001Y0
Major Research Paper
APD2200Y
Child Study: Observation, Evaluation, Reporting, and Research
APD2201Y
Childhood Education Seminar I
APD2202H
Childhood Education Seminar II: Advanced Teaching
APD2210Y
Introduction to Curriculum l: Core Areas
APD2211H
Theory and Curriculum I: Language and Literacy
APD2212H
Theory and Curriculum II: Mathematics
APD2214H
Curriculum and Pedagogies for Cross-Curricular Teaching
(Prerequisite: APD2210Y.)
APD2220Y
Teaching Practicum
APD2221Y
Advanced Teaching Practicum
APD2222H Professional Practice Project: Role A
APD2223H Professional Practice Project: Role B
APD2232H Consultation Skill Development for Educators
APD2270Y Introduction to Special Education and Adaptive Instruction
APD2275H
Technology for Adaptive Instruction and Special Education
APD2293H
Interpretation of Educational Research
APD2296H
Reading and Writing Difficulties
APD3303H Advanced Study of Tools and Research Methods for Investigating Problems of Practice: Data-Driven Research for Decision-Making
APD3305H Systems and Organizational Change
APD5000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Master's Level
APD6000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Doctoral Level

Individual Reading and Research Courses

Course Code Course Title
APD2252H Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Master's Level

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Counselling and Clinical Psychology MA and PhD; Field: Clinical and Counselling Psychology Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please review the course schedule on the Registrar’s Office and Student Experience website.

Course Code Course Title
APD1202H Theories and Techniques of Counselling and Psychotherapy — Part I
APD1203Y+
Practicum I: Interventions in Counselling Psychology and Psychotherapy
APD1208Y+
Cognitive and Personality Theory and Assessment
APD1219H
Ethical Issues in Professional Practice in Psychology and Psychotherapy
APD1228H
Couples Counselling
APD1260H Family Therapy
(Exclusion: APD1261H.)
APD1261H
Group Work in Counselling and Psychotherapy
APD1263H
Research Methods for Clinical and Counselling Psychology (RM)
APD1267H Emotion-Focused Therapy
(Exclusion: APD5004H.)
APD3202H
A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM)
APD3204H
Contemporary History and Systems in Human Development and Applied Psychology
APD3215H
Advanced Psychotherapy Seminar
APD3217Y+
Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (Credit/No Credit)
APD3225H
Assessment and Diagnosis of Personality and Psychopathology
APD3260H
Psychodiagnostic Systems
APD3261H+ Clinical Supervision and Consultation Practicum
(Pre- or corequisite: APD3217Y+.)
APD3268Y
Internship in Clinical and Counselling Psychology
APD5000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Master's Level
APD6000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Doctoral Level
JOI1287H Introduction to Applied Statistics (RM)
JOI1288H Intermediate Statistics and Research Design (RM)
JOI3048H Intermediate Statistics in Educational Research: Multiple Regression Analysis (RM)

Individual Reading and Research Courses

Course Code Course Title
APD2252H Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Master’s Level
APD3252H Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Doctoral Level

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Counselling and Clinical Psychology MA, PhD; Field: Clinical and Counselling Psychology Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please review the course schedule on the Registrar’s Office and Student Experience website.

Course Code Course Title
APD1202H Theories and Techniques of Counselling and Psychotherapy — Part I
(Exclusion: APD1202Y.)
APD1203Y+
Practicum I: Interventions in Counselling Psychology and Psychotherapy
APD1208Y+
Cognitive and Personality Theory and Assessment
APD1219H
Ethical Issues in Professional Practice in Psychology and Psychotherapy
APD1228H
Couples Counselling
APD1260H Family Therapy
(Exclusion: APD1261H.)
APD1261H
Group Work in Counselling and Psychotherapy
APD1263H
Research Methods for Clinical and Counselling Psychology (RM)
APD1267H Emotion-Focused Therapy
(Exclusion: APD5004H.)
APD3202H
A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM)
APD3204H
Contemporary History and Systems in Human Development and Applied Psychology
APD3215H
Advanced Psychotherapy Seminar
APD3217Y+
Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (Credit/No Credit)
APD3225H
Assessment and Diagnosis of Personality and Psychopathology
APD3260H
Psychodiagnostic Systems
APD3261H+ Clinical Supervision and Consultation Practicum
(Pre- or corequisite: APD3217Y+.)
APD3268Y
Internship in Clinical and Counselling Psychology
APD5000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Master's Level
APD6000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Doctoral Level
JOI1287H Introduction to Applied Statistics (RM)
JOI1288H Intermediate Statistics and Research Design (RM)
JOI3048H Intermediate Statistics in Educational Research: Multiple Regression Analysis (RM)

Individual Reading and Research Courses

Course Code Course Title
APD2252H Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Master's Level
APD3252H Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Doctoral Level

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Psychological Clinical Science
APHD: Counselling and Clinical Psychology MA; Field: Clinical and Counselling Psychology

Master of Arts

Program Description

The Counselling and Clinical Psychology program offers studies leading to the MA and PhD degrees. It is offered by the graduate Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), St. George campus, and the graduate Department of Psychological Clinical Science at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC).

This graduate program is intended for students seeking to pursue careers in research, teaching, and clinical practice. At the time of application, students will be required to identify a preference for a specific field as well as for a potential supervisor with whom they would work if admitted to the program.

The program has two fields:

  • Clinical and Counselling Psychology, offered primarily by OISE;

  • Clinical Psychology, offered primarily by UTSC.

The field in Clinical and Counselling Psychology is offered primarily by the OISE Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development. This field is based on a bio-psycho-social model with an emphasis on diversity. It shares an emphasis with the Clinical Psychology field on assessment and the treatment of psychopathology in adults.

This MA program is designed for applicants interested in working as researchers or practitioners in a variety of psychological and educational settings. This program enables students to apply for registration with the College of Psychologists of Ontario (CPO) as a Psychological Associate. It also fulfils the requirements of students who plan to apply to the PhD program, Clinical and Counselling Psychology field.

The MA is taken on a full-time or part-time basis. However, students in the part-time option will be required to complete one year of full-time study to fulfil their degree requirements.

For 2022-23 and further extension to the 2023-24 academic year, admissions to the part-time option have been administratively suspended.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree in psychology or any appropriate bachelor's degree that would contain the psychology requirement equivalent (defined as 6.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs] in psychology, including 0.5 FCE in research methods and 0.5 FCE in statistics. It is expected that students will have completed 1.0 FCE at the third- or fourth-year level in each of three core areas of general psychology: biological bases of behaviour, cognitive/affective bases of behaviour, and social bases of behaviour. Students who are missing courses in these areas may be required to complete additional courses during the degree.

  • A standing equivalent to a University of Toronto A– or better in the final year.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 4.5 FCEs as follows:

    • APD1202H Theories and Techniques of Counselling and Psychotherapy — Part I (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1203Y+ Practicum I: Interventions in Counselling Psychology and Psychotherapy (1.0 FCE) (500 hours of practicum). MA students will attend a minimum of three colloquium presentations during their program, which partially fulfills the course requirements for APD1203Y+.

    • APD1208Y+ Cognitive and Personality Theory and Assessment (1.0 FCE).

    • APD1219H Ethical Issues in Professional Practice in Psychology and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1228H Couples Counselling (0.5 FCE) or APD1261H Group Work in Counselling and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE) (or an equivalent course).

    • APD1263H Research Methods for Clinical and Counselling Psychology (RM) (0.5 FCE).

    • JOI1288H Intermediate Statistics and Research Design (RM) (0.5 FCE).

  • Master's thesis.

  • Full-time option: Full-time, on-campus study is required from September to April, which represents the Fall and Winter sessions. Normally, 1.5 FCEs are taken in each of the Fall and Winter sessions and a maximum of 1.0 FCE in the Summer session. Under this option, it is expected that all degree requirements will be completed within two years.

  • Part-time option (for 2022-23 and further extension to the 2023-24 academic year, admissions to the part-time option have been administratively suspended): For this option, students can register as part-time students at the beginning of their program. However, they will be required to register as full-time students for one year of the program. In this option, students will normally take 1.0 FCE annually during the beginning of their program and 1.5 FCEs in each of the Fall and Winter sessions in their year of full-time study. Once they have begun their last required course, they must register continuously and pay the part-time fees until all degree requirements have been completed. Under this option, it is expected that all degree requirements will be completed within two to three years, up to a maximum of six years.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S);
10 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Coursework plus thesis plus practicum



Master of Arts
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time
Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Counselling and Clinical Psychology MA; Field: Clinical and Counselling Psychology

Master of Arts

Overview

The Counselling and Clinical Psychology program offers studies leading to the MA and PhD degrees. It is offered by the graduate Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development (APHD) at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), St. George campus, and the graduate Department of Psychological Clinical Science at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC).

This graduate program is intended for students seeking to pursue careers in research, teaching, and clinical practice. At the time of application, students will be required to identify a preference for a specific field as well as for a potential supervisor with whom they would work if admitted to the program.

The program has two fields:

  • Clinical and Counselling Psychology, offered primarily by OISE

  • Clinical Psychology, offered primarily by UTSC

The field in Clinical and Counselling Psychology is offered primarily by the OISE Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development. This field is based on a bio-psycho-social model with an emphasis on diversity. It shares an emphasis with the Clinical Psychology field on assessment and the treatment of psychopathology in adults.

Contact and Address

Web: www.oise.utoronto.ca/aphd

Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
University of Toronto
252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1V6
Canada

Program Description

This MA program is designed for applicants interested in working as researchers or practitioners in a variety of psychological and educational settings. This program enables students to apply for registration with the College of Psychologists of Ontario (CPO) as a Psychological Associate. It also fulfils the requirements of students who plan to apply to the PhD program, Clinical and Counselling Psychology field.

The MA is taken on a full-time or part-time basis. However, students in the part-time option will be required to complete one year of full-time study to fulfil their degree requirements.

For 2022-23 and further extension to the 2023-24 academic year, admissions to the part-time option have been administratively suspended.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree in psychology or any appropriate bachelor's degree that would contain the psychology requirement equivalent (defined as 6.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs] in psychology, including 0.5 FCE in research methods and 0.5 FCE in statistics, with a standing equivalent to a University of Toronto A– or better in the final year. It is expected that students will have completed 1.0 FCE at the third- or fourth-year level in each of three core areas of general psychology: biological bases of behaviour, cognitive/affective bases of behaviour, and social bases of behaviour. Students who are missing courses in these areas may be required to complete additional courses during the degree.

  • A standing equivalent to a University of Toronto A– or better in the final year.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 4.5 FCEs as follows:

    • APD1202H Theories and Techniques of Counselling and Psychotherapy — Part I (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1203Y+ Practicum I: Interventions in Counselling Psychology and Psychotherapy (1.0 FCE) (500 hours of practicum). MA students will attend a minimum of three colloquium presentations during their program, which partially fulfills the course requirements for APD1203Y+.

    • APD1208Y+ Cognitive and Personality Theory and Assessment (1.0 FCE).

    • APD1219H Ethical Issues in Professional Practice in Psychology and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1228H Couples Counselling (0.5 FCE) or APD1261H Group Work in Counselling and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE) (or an equivalent course).

    • APD1263H Research Methods for Clinical and Counselling Psychology (0.5 FCE) (RM).

    • JOI1288H Intermediate Statistics and Research Design (RM) (0.5 FCE).

  • Master's thesis.

  • Full-time option: Full-time, on-campus study is required from September to April, which represents the Fall and Winter sessions. Normally, 1.5 FCEs are taken in each of the Fall and Winter sessions and a maximum of 1.0 FCE in the Summer session. Under this option, it is expected that all degree requirements will be completed within two years.

  • Part-time option (for 2022-23 and further extension to the 2023-24 academic year, admissions to the part-time option have been administratively suspended): For this option, students can register as part-time students at the beginning of their program. However, they will be required to register as full-time students for one year of the program. In this option, students will normally take 1.0 FCE annually during the beginning of their program and 1.5 FCEs in each of the Fall and Winter sessions in their year of full-time study. Once they have begun their last required course, they must register annually and pay the part-time fees until all degree requirements have been completed. Under this option, it is expected that all degree requirements will be completed within two to three years, up to a maximum of six years.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S);
10 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Coursework plus thesis plus practicum



Master of Arts
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time
Psychological Clinical Science
APHD: Counselling and Clinical Psychology PhD; Field: Clinical and Counselling Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The Counselling and Clinical Psychology program offers studies leading to the MA and PhD degrees. It is offered by the graduate Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), St. George campus, and the graduate Department of Psychological Clinical Science at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC).

This graduate program is intended for students seeking to pursue careers in research, teaching, and clinical practice. At the time of application, students will be required to identify a preference for a specific field as well as for a potential supervisor with whom they would work if admitted to the program.

The program has two fields:

  • Clinical and Counselling Psychology, offered primarily by OISE;

  • Clinical Psychology, offered primarily by UTSC.

The field in Clinical and Counselling Psychology is offered primarily by the OISE Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development. This field is based on a bio-psycho-social model with an emphasis on diversity. It shares an emphasis with the Clinical Psychology field on assessment and the treatment of psychopathology in adults.

The principal aim of this PhD program is the development of research and theoretical knowledge in counselling and clinical psychology, assessment skills, and knowledge and training in professional issues. Students are expected to conduct advanced research and to develop professional knowledge and skills. Graduates will be prepared to assume a variety of positions in psychological teaching, research, and practice in universities, community settings and agencies offering psychological services, and in university or college counselling centres.

The Counselling and Clinical Psychology program offers both a full-time and flexible-time PhD, and progress in the program will be reviewed annually. The program in Clinical and Counselling Psychology at OISE was accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) in 2015-2016 for a six-year term.

For 2022-23 and further extension to the 2023-24 academic year, admissions to the flexible-time PhD option have been administratively suspended.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree in psychology or any appropriate bachelor's degree that would contain the psychology requirement equivalent (defined as 6.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs] in psychology, including 0.5 FCE in research methods and 0.5 FCE in statistics, with a standing equivalent to a University of Toronto A– or better in the final year. It is expected that students will have completed 1.0 FCE at the third- or fourth-year level in each of three core areas of general psychology: biological bases of behaviour, cognitive/affective bases of behaviour, and social bases of behaviour. Students who are missing courses in these areas may be required to complete additional courses during the degree.

  • A University of Toronto MA degree in Clinical and Counselling Psychology with a grade of A– or better, or its equivalent.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 5.5 FCEs as follows:

    • 2.5 FCEs in Counselling and Psychotherapy:

      • APD3215H Advanced Psychotherapy Seminar;

      • APD3217Y+ Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (Credit/No Credit; 600-hour practicum); and APD3268Y Internship in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (1,600-hour internship — arrangements must be made in consultation with the Director of Clinical Training). PhD students will attend a minimum of six colloquium presentations during their program, which partially fulfills the course requirements for APD3268Y.

    • 1.0 FCE in Psychology Measurement/Assessment and Diagnosis:

      • APD3225H Assessment and Diagnosis of Personality and Psychopathology; and

      • APD3260H Psychodiagnostic Systems.

    • 0.5 FCE in Supervision and Consultation:

      • APD3261H+ Clinical Supervision and Consultation Practicum.

    • 1.0 FCE in Advanced Research Methods:

      • APD3202H A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM); and

      • An advanced-level statistics course (in consultation with supervisors). Courses can be drawn from those offered at OISE or other Faculties with the permission of the instructor.

    • 0.5 FCE in History and Systems Psychology:

      • APD3204H Contemporary History and Systems in Human Development and Applied Psychology.

  • Comprehensive examination: In addition to normal course requirements, students will complete two comprehensive components. First, a manuscript for publication and presentation at a peer review conference, normally in Year 1 of the program. Second, students will be examined systematically in general psychology and in professional psychology. The examination will normally be taken at the end of Year 2 of full-time study.

  • Doctoral dissertation: All students must develop, complete, and defend in a Doctoral Final Oral Examination a doctoral dissertation supervised by a full-time member of the Counselling and Clinical Psychology faculty. The content of such dissertation research may address theoretical issues applicable to clinical and counselling concerns and practice, relate to the development of programs in a variety of educational or applied settings, or in some other way contribute to the development and practice of clinical and counselling psychology.

  • Students must register continuously and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been fulfilled.

  • Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

6 years

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

 

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)

For 2022-23 and further extension to the 2023-24 academic year, admissions to the flexible-time PhD option have been administratively suspended.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree in psychology or any appropriate bachelor's degree that would contain the psychology requirement equivalent (defined as 6.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs] in psychology, including 0.5 FCE in research methods and 0.5 FCE in statistics, with a standing equivalent to a University of Toronto A– or better in the final year. It is expected that students will have completed 1.0 FCE at the third- or fourth-year level in each of three core areas of general psychology: biological bases of behaviour, cognitive/affective bases of behaviour, and social bases of behaviour. Students who are missing courses in these areas may be required to complete additional courses during the degree.

  • A University of Toronto MA degree in Clinical and Counselling Psychology with a grade of A– or better, or its equivalent.

  • Applicants to the flexible-time PhD option are accepted under the same admission requirements as applicants to the full-time PhD option.

  • Applicants must demonstrate that they are currently employed and active professionals engaged in activities relevant to their proposed program of study.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 5.5 FCEs as follows:

    • 2.5 FCEs in Counselling and Psychotherapy:

      • APD3215H Advanced Psychotherapy Seminar;

      • APD3217Y+ Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (Credit/No Credit; 600-hour practicum); and APD3268Y Internship in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (1,600-hour internship — arrangements must be made in consultation with the Coordinator of Internship and Counselling Services). PhD students will attend a minimum of six colloquium presentations during their program, which partially fulfills the course requirements for APD3268Y.

    • 1.0 FCE in Psychology Measurement/Assessment and Diagnosis:

      • APD3225H Assessment and Diagnosis of Personality and Psychopathology; and

      • APD3260H Psychodiagnostic Systems.

    • 0.5 FCE in Supervision and Consultation:

      • APD3261H+ Clinical Supervision and Consultation Practicum.

    • 1.0 FCE in Advanced Research Methods:

      • APD3202H A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM); and

      • An advanced-level statistics course (in consultation with supervisors). Courses can be drawn from those offered at OISE or other Faculties with the permission of the instructor.

    • 0.5 FCE in History and Systems Psychology:

      • APD3204H Contemporary History and Systems in Human Development and Applied Psychology.

  • Comprehensive examination: In addition to normal course requirements, students will complete two comprehensive components. First, a manuscript for publication and presentation at a peer review conference, normally in Year 1 of the program. Second, students will be examined systematically in general psychology and in professional psychology. The examination will normally be taken at the end of Year 2 of full-time study.

  • Doctoral dissertation: All students must develop, complete, and defend in a Doctoral Final Oral Examination a doctoral dissertation supervised by a full-time member of the Counselling and Clinical Psychology faculty. The content of such dissertation research may address theoretical issues applicable to clinical and counselling concerns and practice, relate to the development of programs in a variety of educational or applied settings, or in some other way contribute to the development and practice of clinical and counselling psychology.

  • Students must register continuously until all degree requirements have been fulfilled. They must register full-time during the first four years and may continue as part-time thereafter, with their department's approval.

  • Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Program Length

6 years

Time Limit

8 years

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Coursework plus thesis plus practicum



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)
Program Length: 6 years
Time Limit: 8 years

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Counselling and Clinical Psychology PhD; Field: Clinical and Counselling Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy

Overview

The Counselling and Clinical Psychology program offers studies leading to the MA and PhD degrees. It is offered by the graduate Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development (APHD) at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), St. George campus, and the graduate Department of Psychological Clinical Science at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC).

This graduate program is intended for students seeking to pursue careers in research, teaching, and clinical practice. At the time of application, students will be required to identify a preference for a specific field as well as for a potential supervisor with whom they would work if admitted to the program.

The program has two fields:

  • Clinical and Counselling Psychology, offered primarily by OISE;

  • Clinical Psychology, offered primarily by UTSC.

The field in Clinical and Counselling Psychology is offered primarily by the OISE Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development. This field is based on a bio-psycho-social model with an emphasis on diversity. It shares an emphasis with the Clinical Psychology field on assessment and the treatment of psychopathology in adults.

Contact and Address

Web: www.oise.utoronto.ca/aphd

Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
University of Toronto
252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1V6
Canada

Program Description

The principal aim of this PhD program is the development of research and theoretical knowledge in counselling and clinical psychology, assessment skills, and knowledge and training in professional issues. Students are expected to conduct advanced research and to develop professional knowledge and skills. Graduates will be prepared to assume a variety of positions in psychological teaching, research, and practice in universities, community settings and agencies offering psychological services, and in university or college counselling centres.

The Counselling and Clinical Psychology program offers both a full-time and flexible-time PhD, and progress in the program will be reviewed annually. The program in Clinical and Counselling Psychology at OISE was accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) in 2015-2016 for a six-year term.

For 2022-23 and further extension to the 2023-24 academic year, admissions to the flexible-time PhD option have been administratively suspended.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree in psychology or any appropriate bachelor's degree that would contain the psychology requirement equivalent (defined as 6.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs] in psychology, including 0.5 FCE in research methods and 0.5 FCE in statistics, with a standing equivalent to a University of Toronto A– or better in the final year. It is expected that students will have completed 1.0 FCE at the third- or fourth-year level in each of three core areas of general psychology: biological bases of behaviour, cognitive/affective bases of behaviour, and social bases of behaviour. Students who are missing courses in these areas may be required to complete additional courses during the degree.

  • A University of Toronto MA degree in Clinical and Counselling Psychology with a grade of A– or better, or its equivalent.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 5.5 FCEs as follows:

    • 2.5 FCEs in Counselling and Psychotherapy:

      • APD3215H Advanced Psychotherapy Seminar;

      • APD3217Y+ Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (Credit/No Credit; 600-hour practicum); and APD3268Y Internship in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (1,600-hour internship — arrangements must be made in consultation with the Director of Clinical Training). PhD students will attend a minimum of six colloquium presentations during their program, which partially fulfills the course requirements for APD3268Y.

    • 1.0 FCE in Psychology Measurement/Assessment and Diagnosis:

      • APD3225H Assessment and Diagnosis of Personality and Psychopathology.

      • APD3260H Psychodiagnostic Systems.

    • 0.5 FCE in Supervision and Consultation:

      • APD3261H+ Clinical Supervision and Consultation Practicum.

    • 1.0 FCE in Advanced Research Methods:

      • APD3202H A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM).

      • An advanced-level statistics course (in consultation with supervisors). Courses can be drawn from those offered at OISE or other Faculties with the permission of the instructor.

    • 0.5 FCE in History and Systems Psychology:

      • APD3204H Contemporary History and Systems in Human Development and Applied Psychology.

  • Comprehensive examination: In addition to normal course requirements, students will complete two comprehensive components. First, a manuscript for publication and presentation at a peer review conference, normally in Year 1 of the program. Second, students will be examined systematically in general psychology and in professional psychology. The examination will normally be taken at the end of Year 2 of full-time study.

  • Doctoral dissertation: All students must develop, complete, and defend in a Doctoral Final Oral Examination a doctoral dissertation supervised by a full-time member of the Counselling and Clinical Psychology faculty. The content of such dissertation research may address theoretical issues applicable to clinical and counselling concerns and practice, relate to the development of programs in a variety of educational or applied settings, or in some other way contribute to the development and practice of clinical and counselling psychology.

  • Students must register continuously and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been fulfilled.

  • Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

6 years

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

 

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)

For 2022-23 and further extension to the 2023-24 academic year, admissions to the flexible-time PhD option have been administratively suspended.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree in psychology or any appropriate bachelor's degree that would contain the psychology requirement equivalent (defined as 6.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs] in psychology, including 0.5 FCE in research methods and 0.5 FCE in statistics, with a standing equivalent to a University of Toronto A– or better in the final year. It is expected that students will have completed 1.0 FCE at the third- or fourth-year level in each of three core areas of general psychology: biological bases of behaviour, cognitive/affective bases of behaviour, and social bases of behaviour. Students who are missing courses in these areas may be required to complete additional courses during the degree.

  • A University of Toronto MA degree in Clinical and Counselling Psychology with a grade of A– or better, or its equivalent.

  • Applicants to the flexible-time PhD option are accepted under the same admission requirements as applicants to the full-time PhD option.

  • Applicants must demonstrate that they are currently employed and are active professionals engaged in activities related to their proposed program of study.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 5.5 FCEs as follows:

    • 2.5 FCEs in Counselling and Psychotherapy:

      • APD3215H Advanced Psychotherapy Seminar

      • APD3217Y+ Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (Credit/No Credit; 600-hour practicum); and APD3268Y Internship in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (1,600-hour internship — arrangements must be made in consultation with the Director of Clinical Training). PhD students will attend a minimum of six colloquium presentations during their program, which partially fulfills the course requirements for APD3268Y.

    • 1.0 FCE in Psychology Measurement/Assessment and Diagnosis:

      • APD3225H Assessment and Diagnosis of Personality and Psychopathology.

      • APD3260H Psychodiagnostic Systems.

    • 0.5 FCE in Supervision and Consultation:

      • APD3261H+ Clinical Supervision and Consultation Practicum.

    • 1.0 FCE in Advanced Research Methods:

      • APD3202H A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM).

      • An advanced-level statistics course (in consultation with supervisors). Courses can be drawn from those offered at OISE or other Faculties with the permission of the instructor.

    • 0.5 FCE in History and Systems Psychology:

      • APD3204H Contemporary History and Systems in Human Development and Applied Psychology.

  • Comprehensive examination: In addition to normal course requirements, students will complete two comprehensive components. First, a manuscript for publication and presentation at a peer review conference, normally in Year 1 of the program. Second, students will be examined systematically in general psychology and in professional psychology. The examination will normally be taken at the end of Year 2 of full-time study.

  • Doctoral dissertation: All students must develop, complete, and defend in a Doctoral Final Oral Examination a doctoral dissertation supervised by a full-time member of the Counselling and Clinical Psychology faculty. The content of such dissertation research may address theoretical issues applicable to clinical and counselling concerns and practice, relate to the development of programs in a variety of educational or applied settings, or in some other way contribute to the development and practice of clinical and counselling psychology.

  • Students must register continuously until all degree requirements have been fulfilled. They must register full-time during the first four years and may continue as part-time thereafter, with their department's approval.

  • Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Program Length

6 years

Time Limit

8 years

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Coursework plus thesis plus practicum



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)
Program Length: 6 years
Time Limit: 8 years

Psychological Clinical Science
APHD: Counselling Psychology EdD; Field: Counselling and Psychotherapy

Doctor of Education

Program Description

Advanced counsellor training in this degree program emphasizes the role of the counsellor in educational and community settings with expertise in supervisory and consultative skills and advanced counselling theory and practice. Graduates will be prepared to take leadership positions in the field of counselling and psychotherapy as educators in colleges and institutes of education; as directors and coordinators of school guidance programs; as specialists in the provision of counselling-related, in-service training for school and college personnel; and as providers of advanced levels of personal counselling in community and educational settings.

The field in Counselling and Psychotherapy will be especially attractive to individuals who have demonstrated a career commitment to the provision of counselling-related services in an educational and community setting. This professional doctorate is designed to prepare students to refine and build on professional knowledge and practice to support the development of scholar-practitioners to be leaders in their fields of professional practice.

The Doctor of Education (EdD) program is only available on a full-time basis.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the additional admission requirements of the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development stated below.

  • Applicants must have the following to be admitted to the EdD program:

    • A bachelor's degree: an appropriate bachelor's degree of any background or discipline from a recognized university, with high academic standing.

    • A master's degree: an MA or MEd degree in Counselling Psychology or School and/or Clinical Child Psychology from the University of Toronto with a grade of B+ or better, or its equivalent from a recognized university. The applicant must have had successful professional experience and interest to increase and advance their knowledge of counselling and psychotherapy to become leaders in their fields. Applicants who hold an MEd or other non-thesis master's degree must submit evidence of their ability to identify a research question or problem, to design and conduct a research study or project, and to report the findings or results, all in a rigorous manner. This constitutes a Qualifying Research Paper (QRP).

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must take courses related to the development of advanced competence in counselling, psychotherapy, and mental health theory and practice and become sophisticated consumers of research in these and related fields. Students must complete a minimum of 5.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including a practicum, internship, and thesis (dissertation in practice) as follows:

    • APD3115H+ Research Proseminar in Counselling and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3215H Advanced Psychotherapy Seminar (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3261H+ Clinical Supervision and Consultation Practicum (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3217Y+ Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (1.0 FCE; Credit/No Credit): complete a 500-hour practicum before the Final Oral Examination.

    • APD3270H0 EdD Internship (0.5 FCE): complete 500 hours of internship, typically after the Final Oral Examination. All internship arrangements must be made in consultation with the Director of Clinical Training.

    • Three courses, one from each of the following three groupings:

      • APD3116H Proseminar ll: Practice-Based Research in School and Counselling Psychology

      • APD3178H Advanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (0.5 FCE) or APD3160H Advanced Family Therapy (0.5 FCE)

      • APD3260H Psychodiagnostic Systems (0.5 FCE) or one elective in a special focus of interest (0.5 FCE).

    • In addition, students must take 1.0 FCE in their specific area of focus.

      • Option 1: Counselling and Psychotherapy for Adults

        • APD3163H Advanced Multicultural Counselling and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE)

        • One elective in a special focus of interest (0.5 FCE)

      • Option 2: Counselling and Psychotherapy for Schools and Youth

        • APD5284Y Assessment and Intervention with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children, Youth, and Families (1.0 FCE).

  • Optional additional practicum. Students may choose to take an optional continuous practicum (APD3271H0 Additional PhD Practicum) in conjunction with the required doctoral practicum course APD3217Y+ Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (Credit/No Credit).

  • Thesis (dissertation in practice). All students must complete a thesis (dissertation in practice), the aim of which is to ensure excellent knowledge of counselling and psychotherapy theory, practice, and policy for professionals working with adults or youth to function as leading scholar-practitioners. The thesis (dissertation in practice) should be: a) well conceived, original, and likely to make a sustained contribution to mental health practice; b) involve creativity, innovative methods and techniques, and have the potential to improve practice; c) exemplary, sets high standards in the field, and can be emulated and; d) has the potential for significant public impact. The focus of the thesis (dissertation in practice) is expected to be on contributions to field development or to innovations in practice. Students will defend their thesis (dissertation in practice) at a Final Oral Examination.

  • Students are full-time and must maintain continuous, full-time registration and pay full-time fees until all degree requirements, including the thesis (dissertation in practice), are completed.

  • Students cannot transfer between the EdD and PhD programs.

Program Length

4 years full-time

Time Limit

6 years full-time

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Coursework plus thesis plus practicum plus internship



Doctor of Education
Program Length: 4 years full-time
Time Limit: 6 years full-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Counselling Psychology EdD; Field: School Psychology

Doctor of Education

Program Description

Counsellor training in this degree program emphasizes the role of the counsellor in educational and community settings with the goal of enhancing their expertise in their professional roles including supervisory and consultative skills and the advanced study of counselling theory and practice. Graduates will be prepared to take leadership positions in the field of counselling and psychotherapy; as educators in colleges and institutes of education; as directors and coordinators of school guidance programs; as specialists in the provision of counselling-related, in-service training for school and college personnel; and as providers of advanced levels of personal counselling in community and educational settings.

The field in School Psychology will be especially attractive to practitioners providing direct services to children and youth in the education system (K-12) and will provide school psychology practitioners with core theoretical and practical training needed to develop research-informed leaders in the field of school psychology. The program is structured to provide students with the requirements necessary for registration as a School Psychologist with the College of Psychologists of Ontario.

The Doctor of Education (EdD) program is only available on a full-time basis.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the additional admission requirements of the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development stated below.

  • Applicants must have the following to be admitted to the EdD program:

    • A bachelor's degree: an appropriate bachelor's degree of any background or discipline from a recognized university, with high academic standing.

    • A master's degree: an MA or MEd degree in Counselling Psychology or School and/or Clinical Child Psychology from the University of Toronto with a grade of B+ or better, or its equivalent from a recognized university. The applicant must have had successful professional experience and interest to increase and advance their knowledge of counselling and psychotherapy to become leaders in their fields. Applicants who hold an MEd or other non-thesis master's degree must submit evidence of their ability to identify a research question or problem, to design and conduct a research study or project, and to report the findings or results, all in a rigorous manner. This constitutes a Qualifying Research Paper (QRP).

    • Applicants must demonstrate either undergraduate- or graduate-level competence in each of the five core content areas of psychology: 1) Biological Bases of Behaviour; 2) Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behaviour; 3) Historical and Scientific Foundations of Psychology; 4) Scientific and Professional Ethics (graduate level); and 5) Social Bases of Behaviour, by successful completion of

      • 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) at the second-, third-, or fourth-year undergraduate level or

      • 0.5 FCE at the graduate level.

    • If the above requirements are not met, students must take additional courses to ensure they have completed the above requirements by the end of their program.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must take courses related to the development of advanced competence in counselling, psychotherapy, and mental health theory and practice and become sophisticated consumers of research in these and related fields. Students must complete a minimum of 5.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including a practicum, internship, and thesis (dissertation in practice) as follows:

    • APD3115H+ Research Proseminar in Counselling and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3215H Advanced Psychotherapy Seminar (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3261H+ Clinical Supervision and Consultation Practicum (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3217Y+ Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (1.0 FCE; Credit/No Credit): complete a 500-hour practicum before the Final Oral Examination.

    • APD3401H Assessment with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children, Youth, and Families (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3402H Intervention with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children, Youth, and Families (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3403H EdD Internship in School Psychology (0.5 FCE): complete 1,600 hours of internship, typically after the Final Oral Examination. All internship arrangements must be made in consultation with the Director of Clinical Training.

    • Three courses, one from each of the following three groupings:

      • APD3116H Proseminar ll: Practice-Based Research in School and Counselling Psychology.

      • APD3178H Advanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (0.5 FCE) or APD3160H Advanced Family Therapy (0.5 FCE).

      • APD3260H Psychodiagnostic Systems (0.5 FCE) or one elective in a special focus of interest (0.5 FCE).​

  • Optional additional practicum. Students may choose to take an optional continuous practicum (APD3271H0 Additional PhD Practicum) in conjunction with the required doctoral practicum course APD3217Y+ Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (Credit/No Credit).

  • Thesis (dissertation in practice). All students must complete a thesis (dissertation in practice), the aim of which is to ensure excellent knowledge of counselling or school psychology theory, practice, and policy for professionals working with adults or children/youth to function as leading scholar-practitioners. The thesis (dissertation in practice) should be: a) well conceived, original, and likely to make a sustained contribution to mental health or school psychology practice; b) involve creativity, innovative methods and techniques, and have the potential to improve practice; c) exemplary, sets high standards in the field, and can be emulated and; d) has the potential for significant public impact. The focus of the thesis (dissertation in practice) is expected to be on contributions to field development or to innovations in practice. Students will defend their thesis (dissertation in practice) at a Final Oral Examination.

  • Students are full-time and must maintain continuous, full-time registration and pay full-time fees until all degree requirements, including the thesis (dissertation in practice), are completed.

  • Students cannot transfer between the EdD and PhD programs.

Program Length

4 years full-time

Time Limit

6 years full-time

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Coursework plus thesis plus practicum plus internship



Doctor of Education
Program Length: 4 years full-time
Time Limit: 6 years full-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Counselling Psychology MEd and EdD; Fields: Counselling and Psychotherapy; Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology; Guidance and Counselling; School Psychology Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please review the course schedule on the Registrar’s Office and Student Experience website.

Course Code Course Title
APD1202H Theories and Techniques of Counselling and Psychotherapy — Part I
(Exclusion: APD1202Y.)
APD1203Y+
Practicum I: Interventions in Counselling Psychology and Psychotherapy
APD1204H
Personality Theories
APD1207H
Counselling Topics in Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Diversity
APD1214H
Critical Multicultural Practice: Diversity Issues in Counselling and Psychotherapy
(Corequisites: APD1202H and APD1302H).
APD1219H
Ethical Issues in Professional Practice in Psychology and Psychotherapy
APD1228H
Couples Counselling
APD1229H
Individual and Group Psychotherapy for Counselling
APD1232H Mindfulness Interventions in Counselling and Psychotherapy
(Exclusion: APD5005H.)
APD1235H Technology, Play, and Social Media in Adolescence
(Exclusion: APD5017H.)
APD1245H
Brief Strategies in Counselling and Psychotherapy
APD1247H
Practicum in Adult Counselling and Psychotherapy
APD1252H
Individual Reading and Research in Counselling Psychology: Master's Level
APD1260H Family Therapy
(Exclusion: APD1261H.)
APD1261H
Group Work in Counselling and Psychotherapy
APD1262H
Educational and Psychological Testing for Counselling
APD1266H
Career Counselling and Development: Transition from School to Work
APD1267H Emotion-Focused Therapy
(Exclusion: APD5004H.)
APD1268H
Career Counselling and Development: Transitions in Adulthood
APD1271H Perspectives on Executive Functions in Education: From Theory to Practice
APD1277H Global Indigenous Healing in Counselling and Psychotherapy
APD1278H
Cognitive Therapy
APD1282H Introduction to Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology
APD1283H Peer and Video-Based Counselling with Practicum Field-Based Learning in Global Mental Health
APD1290H
Indigenous Healing in Counselling and Psychoeducation
APD1302H Theories and Techniques of Counselling and Psychotherapy — Part II
(Prerequisite: APD1202H. Exclusion: APD1202Y.)
APD1902H Theories and Techniques of Counselling in a Global Context
APD2286H Global Indigenous Healing in Counselling and Psychotherapy
APD2291H Introduction to Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology
APD2293H
Interpretation of Educational Research
APD2298H Peer and Video-Based Counselling with Practicum Field-Based Learning in Global Mental Health
APD3115H+ Research Proseminar in Counselling and Psychotherapy
APD3116H Proseminar ll: Practice-Based Research in School and Counselling Psychology
(Prerequisite: APD3115H. Exclusion: APD6008H.)
APD3160H Advanced Family Therapy
APD3163H Advanced Multicultural Counselling and Psychotherapy
APD3178H Advanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
APD3202H
A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM)
(Prerequisites: MEd students must have completed APD1212H or APD2293H or JOI1287H.)
APD3215H
Advanced Psychotherapy Seminar
APD3217Y+
Advanced Practicum in Clinical and Counselling Psychology (Credit/No Credit)
APD3260H Psychodiagnostic Systems
APD3261H+ Clinical Supervision and Consultation Practicum
(Pre- or corequisite: APD3217Y+.)
APD3268Y
Internship in Clinical and Counselling Psychology
APD3270H0
EdD Internship
APD3271H0
Additional PhD Practicum
APD3401H Assessment with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children, Youth, and Families
APD3402H Intervention with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children, Youth, and Families
APD3403H EdD Internship in School Psychology
APD5000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Master's Level
APD6000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Doctoral Level
JOI3228H Mixed Methods Research Design in Social Sciences (RM)
JOI3229H Meta-Analysis for Research in Psychology and Education (RM)
JOI6000H Advanced Quantitative Research Methods Courses

Individual Reading and Research Courses

Course Code Course Title
APD2252H Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Master's Level
APD2252H Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Doctoral Level

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Counselling Psychology MEd; Field: Counselling and Psychotherapy

Master of Education

Program Description

The field in Counselling and Psychotherapy, within the Counselling Psychology MEd degree program, provides individuals with the opportunity to learn and develop skills appropriate for counselling individuals across a variety of work settings. Students are encouraged to tailor their courses and practicum learning experiences to meet their particular learning goals. Examples of the types of goals for which suitable programs of study could be developed include counselling and psychotherapy with adults, college and university students, or older adults: career counselling; counselling with diverse clients; and counselling and psychotherapy in community mental health and family service settings. The program of study provides students with the basic preparation for certification as a Certified Canadian Counsellor (CCC) with the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA) and as a Registered Psychotherapist with the College of Registered Psychotherapists of Ontario (CRPO).

The MEd program is typically offered on a full-time basis with a limited number of part-time spots available.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the additional admission requirements of the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree of any background or discipline, with a grade equivalent to a University of Toronto B+ or better in the final year, from a recognized university.

  • At least one year of relevant counselling-related experience.

  • Two letters of reference.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • APD1202H Theories and Techniques of Counselling and Psychotherapy — Part I (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1203Y+ Practicum I: Interventions in Counselling Psychology and Psychotherapy (1.0 FCE). The practicum placement is the supervised training component of this course.

    • APD1214H Critical Multicultural Practice: Diversity Issues in Counselling and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE; corequisites: APD1202H and APD1302H).

    • APD1219H Ethical Issues in Professional Practice and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1260H Family Therapy (0.5 FCE) or APD1261H Group Work in Counselling and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1302H Theories and Techniques of Counselling and Psychotherapy — Part II (0.5 FCE).

    • 1.5 FCEs in electives. Recommended electives: one of

      • APD1266H Career Counselling and Development: Transition from School to Work (0.5 FCE),

      • APD1267H Emotion-Focused Therapy (0.5 FCE),

      • APD1268H Career Counselling and Development: Transitions in Adulthood (0.5 FCE),

      • APD1278H Cognitive Therapy (0.5 FCE).

  • A comprehensive examination. Upon completion of program course requirements, students must pass a written comprehensive exam of selected topics from the program curriculum and training.

  • Optional additional practicum, counted as one of the electives. Students may choose to complete a practicum (APD1247H Practicum in Adult Counselling and Psychotherapy) for an additional 250 hours of field placement concurrent with the required course (APD1203Y+ Practicum I: Interventions in Counselling Psychology and Psychotherapy). Arrangements for the practicum placement must be made in consultation with and the approval of the Director of Clinical Training.

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W);
10 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

1. Coursework-only or
2. Coursework plus practicum



Master of Education
Program Length: 5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Counselling Psychology MEd; Field: Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology

Master of Education

Program Description

The field in Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology, within the Counselling Psychology MEd degree program, provides individuals with the opportunity to learn and develop skills appropriate for the field of mental health and counselling psychology in international contexts. Students will be prepared to work in a variety of global applied settings with a focus on mental health. This degree program is ideally suited to students interested in an international perspective of mental health and counselling. This degree is cohort based and is offered full-time only.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the additional admission requirements of the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree, with a grade equivalent to a University of Toronto B+ or better in the final year, from a recognized university.

  • At least one year of relevant counselling-related experience.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • Normally, an interview is required prior to admission.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • APD1219H Ethical Issues in Professional Practice in Psychology and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1228H Couples Counselling (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1245H Brief Strategies in Counselling and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1278H Cognitive Therapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1282H Introduction to Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1283H Peer and Video-Based Counselling with Practicum Field-Based Learning in Global Mental Health (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1902H Theories and Techniques of Counselling in a Global Context (0.5 FCE).

    • APD2293H Interpretation of Educational Research (0.5 FCE).

    • APD5000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Master's Level (0.5 FCE).

    • In consultation with the program chair, students will take APD1268H Career Counselling and Development: Transitions in Adulthood, APD1291H Addictive Behaviours: Approaches to Assessment and Intervention, or another elective.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus practicum

 



Master of Education
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Counselling Psychology MEd; Field: Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology (Dual Degree Programs)

1) Dual Degree Program: Master of Education (University of Toronto) / Master of Medicine (China Medical University)

Program Description

This dual degree program creates a pathway between U of T's Master of Education (MEd) in Counselling Psychology, Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology (GMHCP) field and China Medical University (CMU)'s Master of Medicine (MMed) in Psychiatry and Mental Health programs.

In Year 1, students complete MMed coursework at CMU in Liaoning Province, China. In Year 2, students complete MEd coursework at U of T in Toronto, Canada. In the Fall session of Year 3, students complete the last course of the MEd requirement (a practicum) in China along with the Year 3 MMed coursework. In Year 3, students will also complete a master's thesis at CMU as part of the dual degree requirements.

Students will gain both degrees in three years rather than the four years it would take to acquire the degrees independently.

Contact

Master of Education / Master of Medicine Program
Web: www.oise.utoronto.ca/aphd/Home/Future_Students/Master_s_Degrees/MEd_Global_Mental_Health_Dual_Degree_Program/

Master of Education Program
Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development, University of Toronto
Email: admissions.oise@utoronto.ca

Master of Medicine Program
Department of Medical Psychology and Mental Health, China Medical University
Email: mqu@cmu.edu.cn

Application Process

  • Applicants must apply directly to both the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development at U of T and the Department of Medical Psychology and Mental Health at CMU. Applicants must apply through U of T’s School of Graduate Studies online admissions application system.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • In order to be admitted to the dual degree program, applicants must meet the admission requirements of both programs. The admission requirements of the GMHCP field within the MEd program are stated below.

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto as well as the specific requirements of the MEd program.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university with a standing in the final year equivalent to at least a U of T B+.

  • At least one year of relevant counselling experience, which could be paid or volunteer.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • Normally, an interview is required prior to admission to the MEd program.

Program Requirements

During their U of T registration in the GMHCP field within the MEd program, students must successfully complete a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs).

Year 1
  • Fall, Winter, and Summer sessions: students complete Year 1 MMed courses at CMU.

Year 2
  • Students complete the following Year 2 MEd courses at U of T.

  • Fall session (1.5 FCEs):

    • APD1282H Introduction to Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology.

    • APD1902H Theories and Techniques of Counselling in a Global Context.

    • In consultation with the program chair, students will take APD1268H Career Counselling and Development: Transitions in Adulthood, APD1291H Addictive Behaviours: Approaches to Assessment and Intervention, or another elective.

  • ​Winter session (2.0 FCEs):

    • APD1219H Ethical Issues in Professional Practice in Psychology and Psychotherapy.

    • APD1245H Brief Strategies in Counselling and Psychotherapy.

    • APD1278H Cognitive Therapy.

    • APD2293H Interpretation of Educational Research.

  • May-to-June period of the Summer session (0.5 FCE):

    • APD1228H Couples Counselling.

  • July-to-August period of the Summer session (0.5 FCE):

    • APD5000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Master’s Level.

Year 3
  • Fall session (0.5 FCE):

    • Complete the U of T MEd course APD1283H Peer and Video-Based Counselling with Practicum Field-Based Learning in Global Mental Health. This is a 250-hour placement in an approved field setting and must be arranged prior to admission to this program.

    • Continue the MMed program requirements at CMU.

  • Winter and Summer sessions:

    • Complete the MMed program requirements at CMU.

Program Length

9 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S/F/W/S)

 

2) Dual Degree Program: Master of Education (University of Toronto) / Master of Science (China Medical University)

This dual degree program will start in September 2023.

Program Description

This dual degree program creates a pathway between U of T's Master of Education (MEd) in Counselling Psychology, Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology (GMHCP) field and China Medical University (CMU)'s Master of Science (MSc) in Applied Psychology programs.

In Year 1, students complete MSc coursework at CMU in Liaoning Province, China. In Year 2, students complete MEd coursework at U of T in Toronto, Canada. In the Fall session of Year 3, students complete the last course of the MEd requirement (a practicum) in China along with the Year 3 MSc coursework. In Year 3, students will also complete a master's thesis at CMU as part of the dual degree requirements.

Students will gain both degrees in three years rather than the four years it would take to acquire the degrees independently.

Contact

Master of Education / Master of Science Program
Web: not available

Master of Education Program
Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development, University of Toronto
Email: admissions.oise@utoronto.ca

Master of Science Program
Department of Applied Psychology, China Medical University
Email: mqu@cmu.edu.cn

Application Process

  • Applicants must apply directly to both the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development at U of T and the Department of Applied Psychology at CMU. Applicants must apply through U of T’s School of Graduate Studies online admissions application system.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • In order to be admitted to the dual degree program, applicants must meet the admission requirements of both programs. The admission requirements of the GMHCP field within the MEd program are stated below.

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto as well as the specific requirements of the MEd program.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university with a standing in the final year equivalent to at least a U of T B+.

  • At least one year of relevant experience, which could be paid or volunteer.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • Normally, an interview is required prior to admission to the MEd program.

Program Requirements

During their U of T registration in the GMHCP field within the MEd program, students must successfully complete a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs).

Year 1
  • Fall, Winter, and Summer sessions: students complete Year 1 MSc courses at CMU.

Year 2
  • Students complete the following Year 2 MEd courses at U of T.

  • Fall session (1.5 FCEs):

    • APD1282H Introduction to Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology.

    • APD1902H Theories and Techniques of Counselling in a Global Context.

    • In consultation with the program chair, students will take APD1268H Career Counselling and Development: Transitions in Adulthood, APD1291H Addictive Behaviours: Approaches to Assessment and Intervention, or another elective.

  • ​Winter session (2.0 FCEs):

    • APD1219H Ethical Issues in Professional Practice in Psychology and Psychotherapy.

    • APD1245H Brief Strategies in Counselling and Psychotherapy.

    • APD1278H Cognitive Therapy.

    • APD2293H Interpretation of Educational Research.

  • May-to-June period of the Summer session (0.5 FCE):

    • APD1228H Couples Counselling.

  • July-to-August period of the Summer session (0.5 FCE):

    • APD5000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Master’s Level.

Year 3
  • Fall session (0.5 FCE):

    • Complete the U of T MEd course APD1283H Peer and Video-Based Counselling with Practicum Field-Based Learning in Global Mental Health. This is a 250-hour placement in an approved field setting and must be arranged prior to admission to this program.

    • Continue the MSc program requirements at CMU.

  • Winter and Summer sessions:

    • Complete the MSc program requirements at CMU.

Program Length

9 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S/F/W/S)

 

3) Dual Degree Program: Master of Education (University of Toronto) / Master of Applied Psychology (Zhejiang University)

This dual degree program will start in September 2023.

Program Description

This dual degree program creates a pathway between U of T's Master of Education (MEd) in Counselling Psychology, Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology (GMHCP) field and Zhejiang University (ZJU)'s Master of Applied Psychology (MAP) programs.

In Year 1, students complete MAP coursework at ZJU in Hangzhou, China. In Year 2, students complete MEd coursework at U of T in Toronto, Canada. In the Fall session of Year 3, students complete the last course of the MEd requirement (a practicum) in China along with the Year 3 MAP coursework. In Year 3, students will also complete a master's thesis at ZJU as part of the dual degree requirements.

Students will gain both degrees in three years rather than the four years it would take to acquire the degrees independently.

Contact

Master of Education / Master of Science Program
Web: not available

Master of Education Program
Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development, University of Toronto
Email: admissions.oise@utoronto.ca

Master of Applied Psychology Program
Department of Psychology and Behavioural Science, Zhejiang University
Email: jiananzhong@zju.edu.cn

Application Process

  • Applicants must apply directly to both the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development at U of T and the Department of Psychology and Behavioural Science at ZJU. Applicants must apply through U of T’s School of Graduate Studies online admissions application system.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • In order to be admitted to the dual degree program, applicants must meet the admission requirements of both programs. The admission requirements of the GMHCP field within the MEd program are stated below.

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto as well as the specific requirements of the MEd program.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university with a standing in the final year equivalent to at least a U of T B+.

  • At least one year of relevant experience, which could be paid or volunteer.

  • Two letters of reference.

  • Normally, an interview is required prior to admission to the MEd program.

Program Requirements

During their U of T registration in the GMHCP field within the MEd program, students must successfully complete a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs).

Year 1
  • Fall, Winter, and Summer sessions: students complete Year 1 MAP courses at ZJU.

Year 2
  • Students complete the following Year 2 MEd courses at U of T.

  • Fall session (1.5 FCEs):

    • APD1282H Introduction to Global Mental Health and Counselling Psychology.

    • APD1902H Theories and Techniques of Counselling in a Global Context.

    • In consultation with the program chair, students will take APD1268H Career Counselling and Development: Transitions in Adulthood, APD1291H Addictive Behaviours: Approaches to Assessment and Intervention, or another elective.

  • ​Winter session (2.0 FCEs):

    • APD1219H Ethical Issues in Professional Practice in Psychology and Psychotherapy.

    • APD1245H Brief Strategies in Counselling and Psychotherapy.

    • APD1278H Cognitive Therapy.

    • APD2293H Interpretation of Educational Research.

  • May-to-June period of the Summer session (0.5 FCE):

    • APD1228H Couples Counselling.

  • July-to-August period of the Summer session (0.5 FCE):

    • APD5000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Master’s Level.

Year 3
  • Fall session (0.5 FCE):

    • Complete the U of T MEd course APD1283H Peer and Video-Based Counselling with Practicum Field-Based Learning in Global Mental Health. This is a 250-hour placement in an approved field setting and must be arranged prior to admission to this program.

    • Continue the MAP program requirements at ZJU.

  • Winter and Summer sessions:

    • Complete the MAP program requirements at ZJU.

Program Length

9 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S/F/W/S)

Coursework plus practicum

 



Dual Degree Program: Master of Education / Master of Medicine
Program Length: 9 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S/F/W/S)

Dual Degree Program: Master of Education / Master of Science
Program Length: 9 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S/F/W/S)

Dual Degree Program: Master of Education / Master of Applied Psychology
Program Length: 9 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S/F/W/S)

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Counselling Psychology MEd; Field: Guidance and Counselling

Master of Education

Program Description

The field in Guidance and Counselling, within the Counselling Psychology MEd degree program, provides individuals with the opportunity to learn and develop skills appropriate for the field of guidance and counselling in the schools. Strong preference for admission to this field is given to experienced teachers who are interested in specializing in guidance and counselling in the schools. The program of study provides students with the basic preparation for certification as a Certified Canadian Counsellor (CCC) with the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association (CCPA).

The MEd program is typically offered on a full-time basis with a limited number of part-time spots available.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the additional admission requirements of the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree, with a grade equivalent to a University of Toronto B+ or better in the final year, from a recognized university.

  • Teacher certification.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • APD1202H Theories and Techniques of Counselling and Psychotherapy — Part I (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1203Y+ Practicum I: Interventions in Counselling Psychology and Psychotherapy (1.0 FCE). The practicum placement is the supervised training component of this course.

    • APD1214H Critical Multicultural Practice: Diversity Issues in Counselling and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE; corequisites: APD1202H and APD1302H).

    • APD1219H Ethical Issues in Professional Practice in Psychology and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1260H Family Therapy (0.5 FCE) or APD1261H Group Work in Counselling and Psychotherapy (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1262H Educational Psychological Testing for Counselling (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1266H Career Counselling and Development: Transition from School to Work (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1302H Theories and Techniques of Counselling and Psychotherapy — Part II (0.5 FCE).

    • 0.5 FCE in electives.

  • A comprehensive examination. Upon completion of program course requirements, students will take a comprehensive examination of selected topics from the program curriculum and training.

  • Optional additional practicum. Students may choose to complete a practicum (APD1247H Practicum in Adult Counselling and Psychotherapy) for an additional 250 hours of field placement concurrent with the required course APD1203Y+ Practicum I: Interventions in Counselling Psychology and Psychotherapy. Arrangements for the practicum placement must be made in consultation with and the approval of the Director of Clinical Training.

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W);
10 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

1. Coursework-only or
2. Coursework plus practicum



Master of Education
Program Length: 5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Developmental Psychology and Education MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

The Developmental Psychology and Education program offers studies leading to the MA, MEd, and PhD degrees. Students have an opportunity to construct an overall perspective on developmental psychology and human development and their implications for practice with children in educational and other applied settings.

Students take foundation courses in human development and research methodology in consultation with their advisor. Elective courses cover a range of areas including cognitive, social, and emotional development; cognition and instruction (language, literacy, and mathematics); special education and adaptive instruction; developmental neuroscience; advanced research methodology and evaluation; and early childhood policy and programs, including child care. The MA program is designed for students wishing to pursue an academic or research-based career.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree with the equivalent of a University of Toronto A– or better. Although most applicants will have a degree in psychology, applicants with an appropriate bachelor's degree in cognitive science, computer science, linguistics, or a helping profession such as occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, physiotherapy, nursing, social work, or another discipline relevant to their specific program of study are also eligible to apply for admission.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • APD1209H Research Methods and Thesis Preparation in Human Development and Applied Psychology (0.5 FCE)

    • JOI1288H Intermediate Statistics and Research Design (RM) (0.5 FCE)

    • Two elective courses (1.0 FCE total) chosen in consultation with the student's advisor, which may include APD2252H Individual Reading and Research (0.5 FCE).

    • Students who have not taken a previous course in human development are required to take APD1201H Child and Adolescent Development (0.5 FCE) or an equivalent.

    • In addition to their required 2.0 FCEs, students who have not taken a previous course in statistics are required to take JOI1287H Introduction to Applied Statistics or an equivalent course.

  • Master's thesis.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis



Master of Arts
Program Length: 3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Developmental Psychology and Education MA, MEd, and PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please review the course schedule on the Registrar’s Office and Student Experience website.

Course Code Course Title
APD1200H
Foundations of Human Development and Education
APD1201H
Child and Adolescent Development
(Prerequisite: at least one of APD1233H or APD1249H, or the instructor's permission.)
APD1206H Mind, Brain, and Instruction
(Prerequisite: at least one of APD1233H or APD1249H, or the instructor's permission. Exclusion: APD5012H.)
APD1209H
Research Methods and Thesis Preparation in Human Development and Applied Psychology
APD1210H Research Practicum (RM)
APD1211H
Psychological Foundations of Early Development and Education
APD1212H
Basics to Program Evaluation in Social Sciences
(Exclusion: APD5021H.)
APD1213H Psychology and Education of Students with ADHD
(Prerequisite: at least one of APD1281H, APD1297H, or the instructor's permission. Exclusion: APD5001H.)
APD1217H
Foundations of Proactive Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention in Children
(Prerequisite: MEd students must have completed APD1281H, APD1297H, or have the instructor's permission.)
APD1231H Mindful Self-Compassion for Educators
(Exclusion: APD5018H.)
APD1233H Cognitive Development and Applications
APD1235H Technology, Play, and Social Media in Adolescence
(Prerequisite: at least one of APD1233H, APD1249H, APD1281H, or the instructor's permission. Exclusion: APD5017H.)
APD1236H Developmental Psychopathology
(Prerequisite: at least one of APD1233H, APD1249H, or the instructor's permission.)
APD1241H Outcomes of Early Education and Child Care
APD1249H Social-Emotional Development and Applications
APD1250H Program Evaluation Practicum (Credit/No Credit)
(Prerequisites: APD1212H and APD2293H.)
APD1256H
Child Abuse: Intervention and Prevention
APD1257H Child Development and Personal History
(Exclusion: APD5010H.)
APD1271H Perspectives on Executive Functions in Education: From Theory to Practice
APD1272H
Play and Education
APD1273H Psychology and Education of Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder
(Prerequisite: MEd students must have completed APD1281H, APD1297H, or have the instructor's permission. Exclusion: APD5024H.)
APD1280H Symbolic Development and Learning
APD1281H Education Exceptionalities, Special Education, and Adaptive Instruction
APD1285H Psychology and Education of Children and Adolescents with Learning Disabilities
(Prerequisite: MEd students must have completed APD1281H or have the instructor's permission.)
APD1286H Foundations of Literacy Development for School Age Children
APD1290H Indigenous Healing in Counselling and Psychoeducation
APD1292H
Instrument Design and Analysis (RM)
APD1294H
Technology, Psychology, and Play
APD1295H Adolescent Mental Health: An Examination of Risk and Resilience
(Prerequisites: MEd students must have completed at least one of APD1249H, APD1281H, APD1297H, or have the instructor's permission.)
APD1296H
Assessing School-Aged Language Learners
APD1297H Mental Health in the Classroom: How Educators Can Help Our Most Vulnerable Students
APD1298H Imagination, Reasoning, and Learning
APD1299H Language Acquisition and Development in Early Childhood
APD2275H
Technology for Adaptive Instruction and Special Education
APD2293H
Interpretation of Educational Research
APD2296H
Reading and Writing Difficulties
APD3200H
Research Pro-seminar in Human Development and Applied Psychology
APD3201H Qualitative Research Methods in Human Development and Applied Psychology (RM)
APD3202H A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM)
(Prerequisite: MEd students must have completed APD1212H, APD2293H, or JOI1287H.)
APD3273H
Researching Early Learning: An Overview Course of Quantitative and Qualitative Methodology
APD3274H
Early Learning and the Thesis
APD3305H Systems and Organizational Change
(Exclusion: APD6006H.)
APD5000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Master's Level
APD6000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Doctoral Level
JOI1287H Introduction to Applied Statistics (RM)
JOI1288H Intermediate Statistics and Research Design (RM)

Individual Reading and Research Courses

Course Code Course Title
APD2252H Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Master's Level
APD3252H
Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Doctoral Level
Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Developmental Psychology and Education MEd

Master of Education

Program Description

The Developmental Psychology and Education program offers studies leading to the MA, MEd, and PhD degrees. Students have an opportunity to construct an overall perspective on developmental psychology and human development and their implications for practice with children in educational and other applied settings. The Master of Education (MEd) program is designed for the reflective teacher or other practitioner in education or related fields. This is a degree primarily designed for those working in applied settings and it does not require a research thesis.

Students take foundation courses in human development and research methodology. Elective courses cover a range of areas including cognitive, social, and emotional development; cognition and instruction (language, literacy, and mathematics); special education and adaptive instruction; program evaluation and mental health; advanced research methodology and evaluation; and early childhood policy and programs, including child care.

The MEd program can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the department's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Admission to the MEd program normally requires an appropriate bachelor's degree with standing equivalent to a University of Toronto mid-B or better.

  • Applicants normally possess a teaching certificate and have at least one year of relevant professional experience.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • APD1200H Foundations of Human Development and Education (0.5 FCE).

    • APD2293H Interpretation of Educational Research (0.5 FCE).

    • 2.0 additional FCEs must be selected from the department electives list, available on the departmental website or in the Applied Psychology and Human Development program guidelines.

    • The remaining 2.0 elective FCEs may be taken from within or outside the department. Elective courses must be chosen in consultation with the student's faculty advisor. Students are asked to meet with their faculty advisor in the first session of their program.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F);
10 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework-only



Master of Education
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Developmental Psychology and Education MEd; Emphasis: Program Evaluation

Emphasis: Program Evaluation

Program Description

Within the MEd program in Developmental Psychology and Education, the emphasis in Program Evaluation is designed to engage students in an exploration of program evaluation used in education, psychology, and social sciences. Program evaluation is a systematic analysis of the process, effectiveness, and outcomes of programs. The primary purpose of program evaluation is to assess what components of a program is working or not and why. Students will learn to understand the concepts and theories needed to be a critical reviewer of evaluation designs and develop core components of program evaluation proposals and reports. As such, students will develop the basic competencies needed for program evaluation, including critically appraising evaluation research; assessing program needs; developing a logic model; evaluating process and outcomes of the program; evaluating efficiency; dealing with ethical issues; warranting evaluation claims; and communicating with stakeholders. Furthermore, students will develop an understanding of how social, cultural, and political factors impact program evaluation.

Program Requirements

Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 1.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs), which are counted towards the total FCEs required for the student's degree program, as follows: 1.0 FCE from the Program Evaluation menu and 0.5 FCE from the Research Methods menu, listed below.

  • Program Evaluation menu (1.0 FCE from the following):

    • APD1212H Basics to Program Evaluation in Social Sciences

    • APD1226H Foundations in Inquiry and Data-Based Decision Making

    • APD1241H Outcomes of Early Education and Child Care

    • APD1250H Program Evaluation Practicum

    • APD1292H Instrument Design and Analysis (RM)

    • APD3202H A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM)

    • APD3301H Issues in Child Study and Education: Research, Policy, and Problems of Practice (RM)

    • APD3305H Systems and Organizational Change.

  • Research Methods menu (0.5 FCE from the following):

    • APD1210H Research Practicum

    • APD3201H Qualitative Research Methods in Human Development and Applied Psychology (RM)

    • JOI1287H Introduction to Applied Statistics (RM)

    • JOI1288H Intermediate Statistics and Research Design (RM)

    • JOI3043H Development and Use of Surveys in Education Research (RM)

    • JOI3048H Intermediate Statistics in Educational Research: Multiple Regression Analysis (RM)

    • JOI3228H Mixed Methods Research Design in Social Sciences (RM).

Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and successful completion of the degree requirements, students may make a request to the Developmental Psychology and Education Master of Education Program Liaison to have the emphasis noted on the student transcript. This request must be made before application for graduation.

Coursework-only



Master of Education (Emphasis: Program Evaluation)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Developmental Psychology and Education PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The Developmental Psychology and Education program offers studies leading to the MA, MEd, and PhD degrees. Students have an opportunity to construct an overall perspective on developmental psychology and human development and their implications for practice with children in educational and other applied settings.

Students take courses in human development and research methodology. Elective courses, chosen in consultation with their advisor, cover a range of areas including cognitive, social, and emotional development; cognition and instruction (language, literacy, and mathematics); special education and adaptive instruction; developmental neuroscience; advanced research methodology and evaluation; and early childhood policy and programs, including child care. The PhD program is designed for students wishing to pursue an academic or research-based career.

The Developmental Psychology and Education program offers both a full-time and a flexible-time PhD program option. Applicants must declare the option for which they are interested in applying. The flexible-time PhD degree program is designed to accommodate demand by practising professionals for a PhD degree that permits continued employment in areas related to their fields of research. Degree requirements for the full-time and flexible-time options are the same.

PhD students have the option of completing an emphasis in Early Learning. Please see details below.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Normally, an appropriate bachelor's degree and a master's degree in developmental psychology and education, cognitive psychology, applied developmental psychology, or child study, with standing equivalent to a University of Toronto A– or better in the master's degree. Applicants with master's degrees in other disciplines such as adult education, anthropology, computer science, curriculum, philosophy, or a profession such as speech-language pathology, nursing, social work, physiotherapy, or occupational therapy may be eligible to apply for admission, but may have to complete additional courses to fulfil master's-level requirements equivalent to the MA in Developmental Psychology and Education. Students who have not completed a master's thesis will be required to submit a Qualifying Research Paper (QRP) prior to final admission to the program.

  • Required letters of recommendation and a second academic letter of recommendation.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • APD3200H Research Proseminar in Human Development and Applied Psychology (0.5 FCE).

    • 0.5 FCE in statistics and research methods from an approved menu.

    • 1.0 FCE in electives (2 X 0.5 FCE).

    • The 2.0 FCEs are normally completed in Year 1 and should be chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students who have an insufficient background in developmental psychology may have to complete additional courses.

  • A comprehensive examination.

    • The purposes of the comprehensive examination are threefold:

      • To demonstrate the student’s ability to work independently within an area of concern in human development.

      • To gain knowledge of a new area, a new technique or method in a specified area in human development.

      • To demonstrate the ability to integrate information at the accepted standard for a PhD student.

    • Students have two options when fulfilling their PhD comprehensive requirements:

      • Option 1: Empirical Research Paper or

      • Option 2: Internship.

  • A thesis and Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Students must register continuously and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been fulfilled.

  • Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Normally, an appropriate bachelor's degree and a master's degree in developmental psychology and education, cognitive psychology, applied developmental psychology, or child study, with standing equivalent to a University of Toronto A- or better in the master's degree. Applicants with master's degrees in other disciplines such as adult education, anthropology, computer science, curriculum, philosophy, or a profession such as speech-language pathology, nursing, social work, physiotherapy, or occupational therapy may be eligible to apply for admission, but may have to complete additional courses to fulfil master's-level requirements equivalent to the MA in Developmental Psychology and Education. Students who have not completed a master's thesis will be required to submit a Qualifying Research Paper (QRP) prior to final admission to the program.

  • Required letters of recommendation and a second academic letter of recommendation.

  • Applicants to the flexible-time PhD option are accepted under the same admission requirements as applicants to the full-time PhD option.

  • Applicants must demonstrate that they are currently employed and are active professionals engaged in activities relevant to their proposed program of study.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • APD3200H Research Proseminar in Human Development and Applied Psychology (0.5 FCE).

    • 0.5 FCE in statistics and research methods from an approved menu.

    • 1.0 FCE in electives (2 X 0.5 FCE).

    • The 2.0 FCEs are normally completed in Year 1 and should be chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students who have an insufficient background in developmental psychology may have to complete additional courses.

  • A comprehensive examination.

    • The purposes of the comprehensive examination are threefold:

      • To demonstrate the student’s ability to work independently within an area of concern in human development.

      • To gain knowledge of a new area, a new technique or method in a specified area in human development.

      • To demonstrate the ability to integrate information at the accepted standard for a PhD student.

    • Students have two options when fulfilling their PhD comprehensive requirements:

      • Option 1: Empirical Research Paper or

      • Option 2: Internship.

  • A thesis and Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Students must register continuously and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been fulfilled. They must register full-time during the first four years and may continue as part-time thereafter, with their department's approval.

  • Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Program Length

6 years

Time Limit

8 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)
Program Length: 6 years
Time Limit: 8 years

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: Developmental Psychology and Education PhD Emphasis: Early Learning

Emphasis: Early Learning

Admissions to this emphasis have been administratively suspended.

Students interested in the Early Learning emphasis should consult with the Graduate Coordinator.

  • Students wishing to complete the emphasis in Early Learning will include the following courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) in their overall PhD program:

    • APD3200H Researching Proseminar in Human Development and Applied Psychology (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3273H Researching Early Learning (0.5 FCE): an overview course of quantitative and qualitative methodology which meets the requirements of an intermediate or higher-level statistics course required of all Developmental Psychology and Education students).

    • APD1211H Psychological Foundations of Early Development and Education (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3274H Early Learning and Thesis Development (0.5 FCE).

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy (Emphasis: Early Learning)

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)
Program Length: 6 years
Time Limit: 8 years

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: School and Clinical Child Psychology MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

The mission of the School and Clinical Child Psychology (SCCP) program is to provide students with theoretical, research, and professional training in preparation for leadership in psychological practice with children, adolescents, and families in school, mental health, private practice, and research settings. The program follows a scientist-practitioner model and is designed to train students to conduct basic and applied research and provide professional training in psychological assessment, therapy, and other psychosocial and instructional interventions, professional consultation, and prevention.

Opportunities are available for research and professional work with infants, young children, adolescents, adults, and families. The degrees are intended to meet the academic requirements of the College of Psychologists of Ontario (CPO) for registration as a Psychological Associate (MA) or Psychologist (PhD).

The curriculum of the SCCP program is designed to establish a strong foundation of core knowledge and skills early in the program, with students free to specialize later on. The program reflects a mix of courses and training opportunities.

A systemic approach is the basis for the training that is provided in assessment and intervention. The knowledge and skills necessary for the practice of school psychology and clinical child psychology overlap considerably, and experience in school and clinical settings complement and enhance each other. Therefore, over the course of the program of study, students are required to undertake practica in both school and clinical child settings.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree in psychology, defined as 6.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) in psychology, including 0.5 FCE in child development and 1.0 FCE in research methods/statistics (of which at least 0.5 FCE must be at the third or fourth-year levels) and at least 3.0 FCEs at the second, third-, or fourth-year levels. The usual admission standard is equivalency to a University of Toronto A– or better.

  • Most applicants will have evidence of relevant professional experience and research experience.

  • Applicants are requested to submit, in addition to two academic references, a letter of recommendation from an applied setting.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 5.0 FCEs (including a practicum course) and a thesis.

    • APD1205H Ethical Issues in Applied Psychology (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1215H Psychological Assessment of School-Aged Children (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1216H Psychoeducational Assessment (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1218H Seminar and Practicum in School-Based Assessment, Consultation, and Intervention (0.5 FCE). The practicum portion consists of 250 hours (one day a week from September to June) and is normally taken in a school setting.

    • APD1222H Approaches to Psychotherapy-Lifespan (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1236H Developmental Psychopathology (0.5 FCE).

    • APD1285H Psychology and Education of Children and Adolescents with Learning Disabilities (0.5 FCE).

    • JOI1288H Intermediate Statistics and Research Design (RM) (0.5 FCE).

    • 0.5 elective FCE.

    • 0.5 FCE in Cognitive/Affective bases of behaviour from an approved course listing. Note: Students who have a 1.0 FCE in Cognitive/Affective bases of behaviour at the senior undergraduate level approved by the program may substitute an elective course for this requirement or a course in the Biological Bases of Behaviour or Social Bases of Behaviour menus, or APD3204H, Contemporary History and Systems in Human Development and Applied Psychology.

  • Thesis.

  • A listing of approved Cognitive/Affective, Social, and Biological bases of behaviour courses is available on the departmental website and in the Applied Psychology and Human Development program guidelines.

  • In addition to the above course requirements, students who have not taken a previous child development course in their undergraduate degree program will be required to take APD1201H Childhood and Adolescent Development.

  • Students who have not taken a previous statistics course or its equivalent must take JOI1287H Introduction to Applied Statistics (RM).

  • Students must achieve a minimum of A– in at least one of APD1215H Psychological Assessment of School-Aged Children and APD1216H Psychoeducational Assessment, and must complete APD1218H Seminar and Practicum in School-Based Assessment, Consultation, and Intervention in order to remain in good standing and be permitted to continue in the program.

  • Failure to meet these criteria will normally result in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student's registration in the program.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis


Master of Arts
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: School and Clinical Child Psychology MA and PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please review the course schedule on the Registrar’s Office and Student Experience website.

Course Code Course Title
APD1205H
Ethical Issues in Applied Psychology
APD1207H Counselling Topics in Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Diversity
APD1215H
Psychological Assessment of School-Aged Children
APD1216H
Psychoeducational Assessment
APD1217H
Foundations of Proactive Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention in Children
APD1218H+
Seminar and Practicum in School-Based Assessment, Consultation, and Intervention
APD1222H Approaches to Psychotherapy-Lifespan
APD1228H Couples Counselling
APD1233H Cognitive Development and Applications
APD1236H
Developmental Psychopathology
APD1245H
Brief Strategies in Counselling and Psychotherapy
APD1251H Reading in a Second Language
APD1256H
Child Abuse: Intervention and Prevention
APD1257H Child Development and Personal History
(Exclusion: APD5010H.)
APD1271H Perspectives on Executive Functions in Education: From Theory to Practice
APD1285H
Psychology and Education of Children and Adolescents with Learning Disabilities
APD1290H Indigenous Healing in Counselling and Psychoeducation
APD1291H
Addictive Behaviours: Approaches to Assessment and Intervention
APD1295H Adolescent Mental Health: An Examination of Risk and Resilience
APD1299H
Language Acquisition and Development
APD3202H
A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM)
APD3204H
Contemporary History and Systems in Human Development and Applied Psychology
APD3221H
Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Children's Problems
APD3222H
Approaches to Psychotherapy with Children, Youth, and Families
APD3224H
Advanced Proactive Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Interventions
APD3231H
Psychodynamic Bases of Therapy
APD3240H+
Advanced Social and Emotional Assessment Techniques
(Prerequisites: APD1216H or equivalent and APD1218H or equivalent and permission of the instructor.)
APD3241H+
Seminar and Practicum in Clinical Assessment and Intervention
APD3242Y
Internship in School and Clinical Child Psychology
APD3243H
Additional PhD Practicum in Assessment and Intervention
APD3260H
Psychodiagnostic Systems
APD3286H
Developmental Neuropsychology
APD5000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Master's Level
APD6000H Special Topics in Applied Psychology and Human Development: Doctoral Level
APD5284Y+
Assessment and Intervention with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children, Youth, and Families
JOI1287H Introduction to Applied Statistics (RM)
JOI1288H Intermediate Statistics and Research Design (RM)

Individual Reading and Research Courses

Course Code Course Title
APD2252H Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Master's Level
APD3252H Individual Reading and Research in Human Development and Applied Psychology: Doctoral Level

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Applied Psychology and Human Development
APHD: School and Clinical Child Psychology PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The mission of the School and Clinical Child Psychology (SCCP) program is to provide students with theoretical, research, and professional training in preparation for leadership in psychological practice with children, adolescents, and families in school, mental health, private practice, and research settings. The program follows a scientist-practitioner model and is designed to train students to conduct basic and applied research and provide professional training in psychological assessment, therapy, and other psychosocial and instructional interventions, professional consultation, and prevention.

Opportunities are available for research and professional work with infants, young children, adolescents, adults, and families. The degrees are intended to meet the academic requirements of the College of Psychologists of Ontario (CPO) for registration as a Psychological Associate (MA) or Psychologist (PhD).

The curriculum of the SCCP program is designed to establish a strong foundation of core knowledge and skills early in the program, with students free to specialize later on. The program reflects a mix of courses and training opportunities.

A systemic approach is the basis for the training that is provided in assessment and intervention. The knowledge and skills necessary for the practice of school psychology and clinical child psychology overlap considerably, and experience in school and clinical settings complement and enhance each other. Therefore, over the course of the program of study, students are required to undertake practica in both school and clinical child settings.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Normally, an appropriate bachelor's degree in psychology or its equivalent and a University of Toronto MA in School and Clinical Child Psychology or its equivalent. The usual admission standard is equivalency to a University of Toronto A– or better in the master's degree. A limited number of outstanding applicants holding equivalent bachelor's and master's degrees in psychology from elsewhere may be considered. However, if the master's program was not equivalent to the University of Toronto MA in School and Clinical Child Psychology, the student will be required to take additional courses to receive equivalent training.

  • Cognate course requirements. 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) at the senior undergraduate level, or 0.5 FCE at the graduate level, in each of the following cognate areas: Biological Bases of Behaviour, Cognitive/Affective Bases of Behaviour, Social Bases of Behaviour, and History and Systems of Psychology.

Program Requirements

  • Students must complete 5.5 FCEs, including a doctoral practicum course and an internship course, as follows:

    • APD3202H A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences (RM) (0.5 FCE).

    • APD3222H Approaches to Psychotherapy with Children, Youth, and Families (0.5 FCE), normally taken in Year 1.

    • APD3241H+ Seminar and Practicum in Clinical Assessment and Intervention, normally taken in Year 2. The practicum portion of APD3241H+ consists of 500 hours (two days a week from September to June) and is normally taken in a clinical setting. Students must complete APD3241H+ in order to remain in good standing and be permitted to continue in the program.

    • APD3260H Psychodiagnostic Systems (0.5 FCE).

    • APD5284Y+ Assessment and Intervention with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Children, Youth, and Families (1.0 FCE).

    • 0.5 FCE from the Psychosocial Interventions course menu:

      • APD3224H Advanced Proactive Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Interventions* or

      • APD3231H Psychodynamic Bases of Therapy*.

* Note: the course is offered every other year. Students interested in other courses that may fulfil the Psychosocial Interventions requirement must receive approval from the SCCP Program Coordinator.

  • 0.5 elective FCE.

  • APD3240H+ Advanced Social and Emotional Assessment Techniques (0.5 FCE).

  • APD3242Y Internship in School and Clinical Child Psychology (1.0 FCE). The internship consists of a 1,600-hour placement, normally taken on a full-time basis over the course of a year in the final year of the student's program.

  • A comprehensive examination. The purpose of the SCCP comprehensive examination is to:

    • Ensure an adequate level of psychological knowledge for professional functioning as a practitioner, academic, and/or researcher.

    • Demonstrate an ability to integrate information at the accepted standard for a doctoral student.

  • A doctoral dissertation.

  • Students must have successfully completed all coursework, passed the comprehensive examination, and have their dissertation completed or well underway, prior to commencing their internship.

  • For each missing cognate course requirement (see Cognitive/Affective, Social, or Biological Bases of Behaviour; Admission Requirements above), students are required to take a 0.5 FCE course from the applicable course menu, which can be found on the departmental website and in the Applied Psychology and Human Development program guidelines. Students may use their elective course to cover one of these requirements.

  • In addition to the above course requirements, students who have not taken a previous child development course must take APD1201H Childhood and Adolescent Development. Students who have not taken a previous statistics course or its equivalent must take JOI1287H Introduction to Applied Statistics (RM).

  • Students must complete APD3241H+ Seminar and Practicum in Clinical Assessment and Intervention in order to remain in good standing and be permitted to continue in the program.

  • Students who are required to take APD1215H, APD1216H, and APD1218H in addition to other courses in the PhD (which is the case for most students coming into the program from elsewhere) must achieve a minimum of A- in at least one of APD1215H Psychological Assessment of School-Aged Children and APD1216H Psychoeducational Assessment, and must complete APD1218H+ Seminar and Practicum in School-Based Assessment, Consultation, and Intervention in order to remain in good standing and be permitted to continue in the program. Failure to meet these criteria will normally result in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student’s registration in the program.

  • Students must register continuously and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been fulfilled.

Program Length

5 years full-time

Time Limit

6 years full-time

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Coursework plus thesis plus practicum plus internship



Doctor of Philosophy
Program Length: 5 years full-time
Time Limit: 6 years full-time

Applied Psychology and Human Development
Architecture, Landscape, and Design: Architecture MArch

Master of Architecture

Program Description

The Master of Architecture (MArch) is a professional degree program and provides a thorough base of knowledge in history, theory, technology, ecology, society, and professional practice, while developing skills in design through an intensive sequence of design studio courses. These are supported by courses in visual communication and architectural representation including computer modelling and other new media. The program aims to develop critical, creative, and independent thinking and research that responds to current design issues and societal changes. The greater Toronto region is used as an urban laboratory for the development of new knowledge and forms of practice.

In Canada, the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB) is the sole agency authorized by the Canadian Architectural Licensing Authorities (CALA) to accredit Canadian professional degree programs in architecture for the purposes of architectural licensure.

 

MArch Program (3-Year Option)

The 3-year option within the MArch program is accredited by the Canadian Architectural Certification Board. Graduates are eligible to begin the process of professional licensure to become an Architect in North America. The qualification is also transferable to many other countries and regions; students are advised to inquire with their local licensing body.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A bachelor's degree (BA, BSc, BASc, BES, BFA, BCom) with a final-year grade point average of at least mid-B.

  • Recommended: courses in secondary calculus, secondary physics, and university-level architectural history (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]).

  • Some preparation or experience in architectural design or the creative arts is encouraged, but not required, such as hand or digital drawing, film or animation, graphic design, or sculpture. This program is suitable for those without formal training in design or the arts; graduates of any discipline are encouraged to apply.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

Program Requirements

  • The course of study is a rigorous full-time, comprehensive program and prepares graduates for the full range of professional activities in architecture. The core program is extensive, and students are required to use their electives to develop an area of special skill and knowledge through an independent study program that culminates in a design thesis.

  • Students study full-time, taking all required courses in each given session. An FZ (fail) in any one course, or a B– grade in two studio courses or in any three courses normally results in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student's registration in the degree program.

  • There is no additional language requirement other than proficiency in English on admission. Writing support is integrated into the program to develop specialized skills that are essential to effective learning and communication in the design fields.

  • Progress in the program is dependent upon satisfactory completion of studio and required core courses in sequence. Exceptions can be made at the discretion of the Program Director, and in consultation with the Office of the Registrar and Student Services in the case of accessibility.

  • Students who complete their Master of Architecture program and are eligible to graduate will have their relevant information automatically forwarded by the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design to the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB), unless the student opts out in writing. The certification confirms the individual’s academic qualifications in compliance with the Canadian Education Standard (CES) in Architecture for entry to the profession. CACB grants and issues certification to applicants who meet the Education Standard and maintains a National Register of those certified and confidential records of all pertinent documentation for all applicants.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 16.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 13.5 FCEs in core courses:

      • 4.0 FCEs: Design Studio

      • 1.0 FCE: Design Studio Research

      • 1.0 FCE: Design Studio Thesis

      • 1.0 FCE: Research Methods

      • 0.5 FCE: Visual Communication

      • 1.0 FCE: History

      • 1.0 FCE: Design Technology

      • 3.5 FCEs: Technics and Planning

      • 1.0 FCE: Professional Practice

    • 2.0 elective FCEs, of which 0.5 FCE must be in the History and Theory category.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W/F/W)

Time Limit

4 years full-time

 

MArch Program (2-Year: Second-Year Advanced-Standing Option)

The 2-year option within the MArch program is accredited by the Canadian Architectural Certification Board. Graduates are eligible to begin the process of professional licensure to become an Architect in North America. The qualification is also transferable to many other countries and regions; students are advised to inquire with their local licensing body.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate non-professional bachelor's degree in architectural studies or environmental design, or a comparable degree focusing on the built environment.

  • Admission to the advanced-standing option is based on the merits of the student's overall academic background and strength of design portfolio as evaluated by the MArch admissions committee.

  • Required: minimum previous completion of

    • four design studio courses

    • one course in visual communications or representation

    • one course in design technology

    • two courses in architecture history and theory (one in 20th-century)

    • one course in structures

    • one course in building science

    • one course in environmental systems.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

Program Requirements

  • The course of study is a rigorous full-time, comprehensive program and prepares graduates for the full range of professional activities in architecture. The core program is extensive, and students are required to use their electives to develop an area of special skill and knowledge through an independent study program that culminates in a design thesis.

  • Students study full-time, taking all required courses in each given session. An FZ (fail) in any one course, or a B– grade in two studio courses or in any three courses normally results in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student's registration in the degree program.

  • There is no additional language requirement other than proficiency in English on admission. Writing support is integrated into the program to develop specialized skills that are essential to effective learning and communication in the design fields.

  • Progress in the program is dependent upon satisfactory completion of studio and required core courses in sequence. Exceptions can be made at the discretion of the Program Director, and in consultation with the Office of the Registrar and Student Services in the case of accessibility.

  • Students who complete their Master of Architecture program and are eligible to graduate will have their relevant information automatically forwarded by the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design to the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB), unless the student opts out in writing. The certification confirms the individual’s academic qualifications in compliance with the Canadian Education Standard (CES) in Architecture for entry to the profession. CACB grants and issues certification to applicants who meet the Education Standard and maintains a National Register of those certified and confidential records of all pertinent documentation for all applicants.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 10.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 8.0 FCEs in core courses:

      • 2.0 FCEs: Design Studio

      • 2.0 FCEs: Design Studio Research

      • 0.5 FCE: Research Methods

      • 0.5 FCE: Design Technology

      • 2.0 FCEs: Technics and Planning

      • 1.0 FCE: Professional Practice

    • 2.5 elective FCEs, of which 0.5 FCE must be in the History and Theory category.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W)

Time Limit

4 years full-time

 

MArch Program (1-Year: Post-Professional Advanced-Standing Option)

The 1-year option within the MArch program is ideal for those who wish to undertake a graduate-level, academic research project, independent of the pathway to professional licensure. Those who wish to become a licensed Architect should consider the 2- or 3-year program options above.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A post-professional advanced-standing option is available for students who are interested in pursuing advanced studies in architecture beyond their professional degree.

  • Applicants must have completed all requirements for an accredited architectural professional degree from a recognized university.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • The post-professional advanced-standing option does not grant a professionally accredited degree.

Program Requirements

  • The course of study is a rigorous full-time, comprehensive program and prepares graduates for the full range of professional activities in architecture. The core program is extensive, and students are required to use their electives to develop an area of special skill and knowledge through an independent study program that culminates in a design thesis.

  • Students study full-time, taking all required courses in each given session. An FZ (fail) in any one course, or a B– grade in two studio courses or in any three courses normally results in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student's registration in the degree program.

  • There is no additional language requirement other than proficiency in English on admission. Writing support is integrated into the program to develop specialized skills that are essential to effective learning and communication in the design fields.

  • Progress in the program is dependent upon satisfactory completion of studio and required core courses in sequence. Exceptions can be made at the discretion of the Program Director, and in consultation with the Office of the Registrar and Student Services in the case of accessibility.

  • Each student’s program of study must receive the approval of the Program Director and, in general, shall consist of a research or design project on which a thesis must be submitted. Faculty members have research expertise in the following areas of interest, which students may pursue: Computation and Fabrication; Health and Society; and Sustainability and Environment.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 6.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 4.0 FCEs in core courses:

      • 0.5 FCE: ALA4010H Field Course

      • 0.5 FCE: ALA4020H Thesis Preparation

      • 1.0 FCE: ALA4021Y Thesis I

      • 1.5 FCE: ALA4022Y Thesis II

      • 0.5 FCE: ALA4030H Colloquium

    • 2.0 elective FCEs, of which 1.0 FCE must be in the student's area of interest.

Program Length

2 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

  1. Coursework-only
  2. Coursework plus thesis


Master of Architecture

MArch Program (3-Year Option)
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W/F/W)
Time Limit: 4 years full-time

MArch Program (2-Year: Second-Year Advanced-Standing Option)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W)
Time Limit: 4 years full-time

MArch Program (1-Year: Post-Professional Advanced-Standing Option)
Program Length: 2 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Architecture, Landscape, and Design
Architecture, Landscape, and Design: Architecture MArch Courses

Not all electives are offered every year. Please check the timetable for current listings available.

Core Courses

Design Studio

Course Code Course Title
ARC1011Y
Design Studio 1
ARC1012Y
Design Studio 2
ARC2013Y
Design Studio 3
ARC2014Y
Design Studio 4

Design Studio Research

Course Code Course Title
ARC3020Y or
 
LAN3016Y or
 
URD2013Y
Design Studio Research (prerequisite: ARC2014Y; exclusions: ARC3016Y, LAN3016Y, URD2013Y) or
 
Landscape Design Studio Research (exclusions: ARC3020Y, URD2013Y) or
 
Urban Design Studio Research (prerequisites: URD1011Y, URD1012Y; exclusions: ARC3015Y, LAN3016Y)

Design Studio Thesis

Course Code Course Title
ARC3021Y Design Studio Thesis (prerequisite: ARC3020Y; exclusion: ARC4018Y)

Design Technology

Course Code Course Title
ARC1022H Design Technology 1
ARC2023H Design Technology 2

History

Course Code Course Title
ARC1031H
Historical Perspectives on Topics in Architecture 1
ARC1032H
Historical Perspectives on Topics in Architecture 2

Post Professional

Course Code Course Title
ALA4010H Field Course
ALA4020H Thesis Preparation (corequisite: ALA4010H)
ALA4021Y Thesis I (prerequisite: ALA4020H)
ALA4022Y Thesis II (prerequisite: ALA4021Y)
ALA4030H Colloquium (prerequisites: ALA4010H and ALA4020H; exclusion: ALD4030H)

Professional Practice

Course Code Course Title
ARC3051H
Professional Practice 1
ARC3052H Professional Practice 2

Research Methods

Course Code Course Title
ARC2017H
Research Methods
ARC3018H Thesis Seminar (prerequisite: ARC2017H)

Technics and Planning

Course Code Course Title
ARC1041H
Building Science 1
ARC1043H
Building Science 2
ARC1046H
Structures 1
ARC2042H Site Engineering and Ecology
ARC2046H
Structures 2
ARC2047H
Building Science 3
ARC2048H Building Science 4 (prerequisite: ARC2047H; corequisite: ARC2014Y; exclusion: ARC2045H)

Visual Communication

Course Code Course Title
ARC1021H
Visual Communications

Elective Courses

Architecture and Health

Course Code Course Title
ARC3600H to ARC3625H
Selected Topics in the History and Theory of Architecture and Health

Computer Modelling

Course Code Course Title
ARC3200H to ARC3225H
Selected Topics in Advanced Computer Applications

Design

Course Code Course Title
ARC1100H
Selected Topics in Design
ARC2015H
Global Architecture: Urban Analysis and Documentation
ARC2016H Global Design Studio

History and Theory

Course Code Course Title
ARC3038H
Global Architecture: History and Theory
ARC3100H to ARC3125H
Selected Topics in Urban Design
ARC3300H to ARC3325H
Selected Topics in Architectural History and Theory

Independent Study

Course Code Course Title
ARC3039H
Independent Study and Research in Architecture

Other

Course Code Course Title
ARC3700H to ARC3725H
Selected Topics in Architecture
ARC3705H Selected Topics in Architecture
ARC3706H Selected Topics in Architecture

Professional Practice

Course Code Course Title
ARC4500H to ARC4510H
Selected Topics in Professional Practice

Technics and Planning

Course Code Course Title
ARC3400H to ARC3425H
Selected Topics in Architecture and Technology
ARC3500H to ARC3525H
Selected Topics in Sustainable Design
Architecture, Landscape, and Design
Architecture, Landscape, and Design: Architecture, Landscape, and Design PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The PhD program in Architecture, Landscape, and Design engages students in advanced research from an intra-disciplinary approach to architecture, landscape, and urban design. The program addresses cultural, social, environmental, historical, and technological questions of the art and design disciplines and the built environment. The program is intended for students entering careers that demand a syncretic approach to research in design and related disciplines.

This full-time program normally begins in September.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate master's degree with an average grade of at least A–. A professional degree in a design discipline is highly desirable, but applicants with a master’s degree in a related discipline in the humanities and social sciences may be considered. An additional specialized program of study may be proposed for successful applicants without professional training.

  • A writing sample in the form of a substantial research paper or publication.

  • Recommendation from three referees.

  • A two-page proposal that indicates a topic of research within a design discipline, possible sub-field(s) (if desired), and potential supervisors. Although letters of commitment from faculty members are not required, the proposed topic must be congruent with the interests and expertise of at least one member of the PhD standing committee. The admissions committee will obtain commitment from the potential supervisor before admitting an applicant, and the applicant will be informed of this in the letter of offer.

  • A portfolio of creative work may also be requested where it is relevant to the applicant’s proposed area of research and the degree to which it may require technical skills typically gained in a professional degree program. For example, this could pertain to an applicant whose proposal includes producing renderings. Questions about whether to include a portfolio in an application should be directed to the Program Director or the applicant’s prospective supervisor prior to the application deadline.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 6.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • ALD4030H Doctoral Research Colloquium (0.5 FCE).

    • ALD4040H Theories and Methods (0.5 FCE).

    • ALD4050H Research Practicum (0.5 FCE; Credit/No Credit).

    • ALD4060H Preparation for Thesis (0.5 FCE; Credit/No Credit).

    • 4.0 elective FCEs chosen from advanced (3000 and 4000 series) graduate-level courses offered by the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design. Depending on their field of study, students may also take advanced graduate courses in cognate disciplines across the University, pending the approval of the Faculty and in consultation with their supervisors.

    • To complete the chosen thesis topic, students may be required to take additional courses or acquire other skills. This will be determined by the supervisor and the Director of Graduate Studies and may include competence in another language.

  • Comprehensive examinations. All PhD students must complete a two-part comprehensive examination normally before their second Summer session. Successful completion of the examinations is required to achieve PhD candidacy. The exam's specific nature and scope are to be determined in consultation with the student's supervisor.

    • The first part, normally to be completed in the Summer session of Year 1, is to achieve breadth in the primary area of study so that the student can teach and conduct research within a larger chosen area within the design disciplines. This will usually involve preparing an annotated bibliography in consultation with the supervisor in the early Summer and writing the exam at the end of the Summer. The first part of the exam will consist of a written response to three questions.

    • The second part, normally to be completed during the second session of Year 2, is to achieve depth in a secondary area of study, within the Faculty or beyond, so that the student can master the context for the advanced research they plan to undertake for their thesis. For the secondary area of study, most students are expected to specialize in one area of study of the design disciplines (for example, architectural history). Alternatively, for this requirement students may focus on a secondary area of study. (For example, computational technologies.) This exam may be administered by a faculty member other than the supervisor, to be determined by the student in consultation with their supervisor. This second part can take one of two formats:

      • a second annotated bibliography to achieve depth in a sub-section of the primary area of study;

      • a course syllabus with readings and outlines of lectures, themes for tutorial discussions, as well as a minimum of three lectures drawn from across the syllabus.

    • Both parts of the examination are marked on a pass/fail basis. An oral examination will follow the completion of the second part of the exam. The oral examination will last no more than 90 minutes.

    • A second attempt of the comprehensive examinations will be allowed within six months, only on the recommendation of the student’s supervisor. If the student fails again, their registration will be terminated. The student must pass both parts of the comprehensive examinations before permission to submit a thesis proposal will be granted.

  • Thesis. Following completion of the comprehensive exam, the student’s supervisory committee will be formed. This will take place no later than the Summer of Year 2 to allow the committee to advise on the development of the student’s thesis proposal.

    • No later than the beginning of Year 3, the student must submit to the PhD program director a thesis proposal that has been approved by the student’s supervisory committee. Once the thesis proposal has been approved, the student will achieve candidacy.

    • The doctoral candidate will then proceed to researching and writing the thesis. The student must meet with their thesis supervisory committee within three months of submitting the thesis proposal; thereafter, the candidate is required to meet at least once a year with the supervisory committee.

    • By the end of Year 4, the candidate should complete a thesis based on original research and the thesis should make a significant contribution to the area of study. The supervisory committee must approve the completed thesis before it is submitted for examination.

    • The candidate will defend the thesis at the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

Program Length

4 years full-time

Time Limit

6 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis


Doctor of Philosophy

Program Length: 4 years full-time
Time Limit: 6 years full-time

Architecture, Landscape, and Design
Architecture, Landscape, and Design: Architecture, Landscape, and Design PhD Courses

Core Courses

Course Code Course Title
ALD4030H
Doctoral Research Colloquium
ALD4040H
Theories and Methods
ALD4050H
Research Practicum (Credit/No Credit)
ALD4060H
Preparation for Thesis (Credit/No Credit)

Elective Courses

Not all electives are offered every year. Please check the timetable for current listings available from the Summer session. Electives are to be selected from advanced (3000 and 4000 series) graduate-level courses offered at the Daniels or other Faculties. These include the following:

Course Code Course Title
ALD4090H Directed Reading in Design (Credit/No Credit)
ALD4100H to ALD4125H Advanced Topics in Architecture, Landscape, and Design (corequisite: ALD4030H or permission of the instructor)
ARC2016H Global Design Studio
ARC3100H to ARC3125H Selected Topics in Urban Design
ARC3200H to ARC3225H Selected Topics in Advanced Computer Applications
ARC3300H to ARC3325H Selected Topics in Architectural History and Theory
ARC3400H to ARC3425H Selected Topics in Architecture and Technology
ARC3500H to ARC3525H Selected Topics in Sustainable Design
ARC3600H to ARC3625H Selected Topics in the History and Theory of Architecture and Health
ARC3700H to ARC3725H
Selected Topics in Architecture
ARC4500H to ARC4510H Selected Topics in Professional Practice
LAN3900H to LAN3910H Landscape Architecture Topics: History, Theory, Criticism
VIS3001H Advanced Readings in Visual Studies
VIS3002H Advanced Readings in Curatorial Studies
VIS3003H Special Topics in Art and Culture
Architecture, Landscape, and Design
Architecture, Landscape, and Design: Landscape Architecture MLA

Master of Landscape Architecture

Program Description

The Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) is a professional program that focuses on urban and regional landscape architecture within a studio-based curriculum. Integrated courses in design; visual communication and modelling; history, theory, and criticism; site engineering and material technologies; horticulture, ecology, hydrology; professional practice and research methods seminars, as well as options for electives, provide a comprehensive professional education in landscape architecture. The program prepares students with a strong base in the fundamentals of the profession, while fostering innovative thinkers able to work collaboratively with allied disciplines, in preparation for becoming the next generation of leaders in landscape architecture.

 

MLA Program (3-Year Option)

The 3-year option within the MLA program is accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Council. Graduates are eligible to begin the process of professional licensure to become a Landscape Architect in North America. The qualification is also transferable to many other countries and regions; students are advised to inquire with their local licensing body.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A bachelor's degree (such as BA, BSc, BASc, BES, BFA, BCom) with a minimum average of mid-B.

  • Some preparation or experience in architectural design or the creative arts is encouraged, but not required, such as hand or digital drawing, film or animation, graphic design, or sculpture. This program is suitable for those without formal training in design or the arts; graduates of any discipline are encouraged to apply.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

Program Requirements

  • Students study full-time, taking all required courses in each given session. An FZ (fail) in any one course, or a B– grade in two studio courses or in any three courses normally results in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student's registration in the degree program.

  • There is no additional language requirement other than proficiency in English on admission. Writing support is integrated into the program to develop specialized skills that are essential to effective learning and communication in the design fields.

  • Progress in the program is dependent upon satisfactory completion of studio and required core courses in sequence. Exceptions can be made at the discretion of the Program Director, and in consultation with the Office of the Registrar and Student Services in the case of accessibility.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 15.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 14.5 FCEs in core courses:

      • 4.0 FCEs: Design Studio

      • 1.0 FCE: Design Studio Options

      • 1.5 FCEs: Design Studio Thesis

      • 2.0 FCEs: Visual Communication

      • 2.0 FCEs: History, Theory, Criticism

      • 1.5 FCEs: Technology

      • 1.5 FCEs: Environment

      • 1.0 FCE: Professional Practice and Research Methods

    • 1.0 elective FCE.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

 

MLA Program (2-Year: Second-Year Advanced-Standing Option)

The 2-year option within the MLA program is accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Council. Graduates are eligible to begin the process of professional licensure to become a Landscape Architect in North America. The qualification is also transferable to many other countries and regions; students are advised to inquire with their local licensing body.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree in landscape architecture, architecture, architectural studies, or environmental design, or a comparable degree focusing on the design of landscapes and the built environment.

  • Admission is based on the merits of the applicant's overall academic background and strength of design portfolio as evaluated by the admissions committee.

  • Minimum previous completion of three design studio courses, two courses in digital visual representation (including Rhinoceros, Illustrator, Laser Cutting), two courses in landscape architecture history and theory (one in 20th-century), and two courses in landscape architecture site engineering (i.e., site grading) and planting design, horticulture, urban ecology, or forest ecology.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

Program Requirements

  • Students study full-time, taking all required courses in each given session. An FZ (fail) in any one course, or a B– grade in two studio courses or in any three courses normally results in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student's registration in the degree program.

  • There is no additional language requirement other than proficiency in English on admission. Writing support is integrated into the program to develop specialized skills that are essential to effective learning and communication in the design fields.

  • Progress in the program is dependent upon satisfactory completion of studio and required core courses in sequence. Exceptions can be made at the discretion of the Program Director, and in consultation with the Office of the Registrar and Student Services in the case of accessibility.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 10.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 9.5 FCEs in core courses as follows:

      • 2.0 FCEs: Design Studio

      • 1.0 FCE: Design Studio Options

      • 1.5 FCEs: Design Studio Thesis

      • 1.0 FCE: Visual Communication

      • 0.5 FCE: History, Theory, Criticism

      • 1.0 FCE: Technology

      • 1.5 FCEs: Environment

      • 1.0 FCE: Professional Practice and Research Methods

    • 1.0 elective FCE.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

 

MLA Program (1-Year: Post-Professional Advanced-Standing Option)

The 1-year option within the MLA program is ideal for those who wish to undertake a graduate-level, academic research project, independent of the pathway to professional licensure. Those who wish to become a licensed Landscape Architect should consider the 2- or 3-year program options above.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A post-professional advanced-standing option is available for students who are interested in pursuing advanced study beyond their professional degree.

  • Applicants must have completed all requirements for an accredited professional degree from a recognized university.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • The post-professional advanced-standing option does not grant a professionally accredited degree.

Program Requirements

  • Students study full-time, taking all required courses in each given session. An FZ (fail) in any one course, or a B– grade in two studio courses or in any three courses normally results in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student's registration in the degree program.

  • There is no additional language requirement other than proficiency in English on admission. Writing support is integrated into the program to develop specialized skills that are essential to effective learning and communication in the design fields.

  • Progress in the program is dependent upon satisfactory completion of studio and required core courses in sequence. Exceptions can be made at the discretion of the Program Director, and in consultation with the Office of the Registrar and Student Services in the case of accessibility.

  • Each student’s program of study must receive the approval of the Program Director and, in general, shall consist of a research or design project on which a thesis must be submitted. Faculty members have research expertise in the following areas of interest, which students may pursue: Computation and Fabrication; Health and Society; and Sustainability and Environment.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 6.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 4.0 FCEs in core courses:

      • 0.5 FCE: ALA4010H Field Course

      • 0.5 FCE: ALA4020H Thesis Preparation

      • 1.0 FCE: ALA4021Y Thesis I

      • 1.5 FCE: ALA4022Y Thesis II

      • 0.5 FCE: ALA4030H Colloquium

    • 2.0 elective FCEs, of which 1.0 FCE must be in the student's area of interest.

Program Length

2 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

  1. Coursework-only
  2. Coursework plus thesis


Master of Landscape Architecture

MLA Program (3-Year Option)
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W/F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

MLA Program (2-Year: Second-Year Advanced-Standing Option)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

MLA Program (1-Year: Post-Professional Advanced-Standing Option)
Program Length: 2 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Architecture, Landscape, and Design
Architecture, Landscape, and Design: Landscape Architecture MLA Courses

Not all electives are offered every year. Please check the timetable for current listings available.

Core Courses

Design Studio

Course Code Course Title
LAN1011Y
Design Studio 1
LAN1012Y
Design Studio 2
LAN2013Y
Design Studio 3 (prerequisite: LAN1012Y)
LAN2014Y
Design Studio 4
LAN3016Y or
 
URD2013Y or
 
ARC3020Y
Landscape Design Studio Research (exclusions: ARC3020Y, URD2013Y) or
 
Urban Design Studio Research (prerequisites: URD1011Y, URD1012Y; exclusions: ARC3015Y, LAN3016Y) or
 
Design Studio Research (prerequisite: ARC2014Y; exclusions: ARC3016Y, LAN3016Y, URD2013Y)
LAN3017Y
Design Studio Thesis

Environment

Course Code Course Title
LAN1041H
Field Studies 1
LAN1043H
Field Studies 2
LAN2045H Landscape Ecology I
LAN2046H Landscape Ecology II (prerequisite: LAN2045H)
LAN2047H Landscape Hydrology I
LAN2048H Landscape Hydrology II (prerequisite: LAN2047H)

History, Theory, Criticism

Course Code Course Title
LAN1031H
History, Theory, Criticism 1
LAN1032H
History, Theory, Criticism 2
LAN1037H Plants and Design I
LAN1038H Plants and Design II (prerequisite: LAN1037H)
LAN2037H
Contemporary Landscape Theory

Post Professional

Course Code Course Title
ALA4010H Field Course
ALA4020H Thesis Preparation (corequisite: ALA4010H)
ALA4021Y Thesis I (prerequisite: ALA4020H)
ALA4022Y Thesis II (prerequisite: ALA4021Y)
ALA4030H Colloquium (prerequisites: ALA4010H and ALA4020H; exclusion: ALD4030H)

Proseminar

Course Code Course Title
LAN3051H Landscape Architecture Research Methods
LAN3052H
Professional Practice

Technology

Course Code Course Title
LAN1047H Site Engineering I
LAN1048H Site Engineering II
LAN2042H
Landscape Materials, Assemblies, Techniques
LAN3045H
Advanced Site Technologies

Visual Communication

Course Code Course Title
LAN1021H
Visual Communication 1
LAN1022H
Visual Communication 2
LAN2023H
Intermediate Visual Communication
LAN3025H
Advanced Visual Communication

Elective Courses

Design

Course Code Course Title
LAN3200H to LAN3210H
Landscape Architecture Topics: Design

Environment

Course Code Course Title
LAN3300H to LAN3310H
Landscape Architecture Topics: Environment
LAN3500H to LAN3510H
Landscape Architecture Topics: Plants

History, Theory, Criticism

Course Code Course Title
LAN3039H
Independent Study
LAN3700H to LAN3710H
Landscape Architecture Topics: Society
LAN3900H to LAN3910H
Landscape Architecture Topics: History, Theory, Criticism

Proseminar

Course Code Course Title
LAN3600H to LAN3610H
Landscape Architecture Topics: Practice

Technology

Course Code Course Title
LAN3400H to LAN3410H
Landscape Architecture Topics: Techniques
LAN3800H to LAN3810H
Landscape Architecture Topics: Technology

Visual Communication

Course Code Course Title
LAN3100H to LAN3110H
Landscape Architecture Topics: Communication
Architecture, Landscape, and Design
Architecture, Landscape, and Design: Urban Design MUD

Master of Urban Design

Program Description

The Master of Urban Design (MUD) is a post-professional program that prepares architects and landscape architects for design-based research and professional practice at the urban and regional scales. The MUD program is committed to design as a primary medium of operation and research in a broad intellectual framework that includes geography, environmental studies, social sciences, media studies, economics, and engineering. It aims for responsible and creative design in the context of contemporary city and region building, with attention to new paradigms of urbanization, global economic restructuring, and information technology. The program emphasizes a coherent intellectual approach that is committed to analysis and critique and seeks to become the central Canadian forum for advanced research, design innovation, scholarship, criticism, and debate in urban design.

MUD Program (2-Year)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A professional degree in architecture (BArch or MArch) or landscape architecture (BLA, MLA). Applicants with a degree in urban planning (MCP, MUP, or MScPl) may be considered for admission if they are able to demonstrate design potential in their application portfolio. Applicants may be required to complete design and/or visual communication workshops before they begin the MUD program, to prepare them for the design studio component of the MUD curriculum.

  • All applicants must submit a portfolio of design work for review. Admission is based on the merits of the applicant's overall academic background and strength of design portfolio as evaluated by the admissions committee.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

Program Requirements

  • Students study full-time, taking all required courses in each given session. An FZ (fail) in any one course, or a B– grade in two studio courses or in any three courses normally results in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student's candidacy for the degree program.

  • There is no additional language requirement other than proficiency in English on admission. Writing support is integrated into the program to develop specialized skills that are essential to effective learning and communication in the design fields.

  • Progress in the program is dependent upon satisfactory completion of studio and required core courses in sequence. Exceptions can be made at the discretion of the Program Director, and in consultation with the Office of the Registrar and Student Services in the case of accessibility.

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 10.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 7.5 FCEs in core courses:

      • 1.0 FCE: Design Studio

      • 2.0 FCEs: Option Design Studio

      • 0.5 FCE: Thesis Preparation and Research

      • 1.5 FCEs: Design Thesis

      • 1.0 FCE: History, Theory, Criticism

      • 1.5 FCEs: other courses

    • 2.5 elective FCEs, of which 1.5 FCEs must be selected from offerings in the History, Theory, Criticism category.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework-only



Master of Urban Design

MUD Program (2-Year)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Architecture, Landscape, and Design
Architecture, Landscape, and Design: Urban Design MUD Courses

Not all electives are offered every year. Please check the timetable for current listings available.

Core Courses

Design

Course Code Course Title
URD1011Y
Urban Design Studio
URD1012Y
Urban Design Studio Options
URD2012Y
Independent Studio in Urban Design (may be undertaken in lieu of an option studio)
URD2013Y or
 
LAN3016Y or
 
ARC3020Y
Urban Design Studio Research (prerequisites: URD1011Y, URD1012Y; exclusions: ARC3015Y, LAN3016Y) or
 
Landscape Design Studio Research (exclusions: ARC3020Y, URD2013Y) or
 
Design Studio Research (prerequisite: ARC2014Y; exclusions: ARC3016Y, LAN3016Y, URD2013Y)
URD2015Y
Urban Design Studio Thesis

History, Theory, Criticism

Course Code Course Title
URD1031H
The History of Toronto Urban Form
URD1041H Introduction to Urban Design Theory

Other

Course Code Course Title
URD1021H
Urban Design Visual Communications
URD1044H
Urban Design and Development
URD2014H
Thesis Research and Preparation
URD2041H
Business and Land Use Planning in Real Estate Development

Elective Courses

History, Theory, Criticism

Course Code Course Title
URD1200H to URD1225H Selected Topics in History and Theory of Urban Design
URD1500H to URD1525H
Selected Topics in Urban Design

Other

Course Code Course Title
URD1022H
Topics in Computer-Aided Urban Design
URD1042H
Urban Design and Environmental Systems
URD1300H Selected Topics in Digital Urbanism
Architecture, Landscape, and Design
Architecture, Landscape, and Design: Visual Studies MVS

Master of Visual Studies

Program Description

The Master of Visual Studies (MVS) is a two-year, full-time professional program with two fields:

  • Curatorial Studies: prepares students for contemporary curatorial practice in the visual arts.

  • Studio: prepares students to further their visual art practice.

The program normally begins in September.

 

Field: Curatorial Studies

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree with significant coursework in humanities and cultural theory from a recognized university, or an appropriate BFA degree from a recognized university.

  • Overall average of at least a B+.

  • Applications must include:

    • artist's statement that includes a description of the proposed body of work in curatorial to be undertaken during the two-year program;

    • full curriculum vitae (CV) with details of exhibition, professional activity, and education;

    • documentation of recent curatorial work;

    • three letters of recommendation;

    • a critical writing sample;

    • transcripts;

    • a portfolio of previous work dependent on the field of future study.

  • Applicants must present a portfolio with documentation of exhibitions including exhibition brochures, curatorial essays, announcement cards, and/or catalogues from curatorial work.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 6.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 4.5 FCEs from the approved course list for curatorial studies.

    • 0.5 FCE MVS Proseminars.

    • 1.5 FCEs in electives. Elective courses are selected in consultation with the student's advisor and are subject to the approval of the Program Director.

  • The internship requirement is normally completed during the Summer session between Year 1 and Year 2.

  • MVS Curatorial Studies students are supervised by an Advisory Panel made up of the Director of the Visual Studies program (or their designate), a graduate faculty member who will be considered to be the student's Principal Advisor, one of the University of Toronto's gallery directors, and an external reader chosen upon approval of the Principle Advisor and Program Director.

  • The graduating thesis project is composed of an exhibition and a qualifying paper.

  • An FZ (fail) in any one course or a B– grade in any two courses normally results in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student’s registration in the degree program.

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

 

Field: Studio

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree with significant coursework in humanities and cultural theory from a recognized university, or an appropriate BFA degree from a recognized university.

  • Overall average of at least a B+.

  • Applications must include:

    • artist's statement that includes a description of the proposed body of work in studio to be undertaken during the two-year program;

    • full curriculum vitae (CV) with details of exhibition, professional activity, and education;

    • documentation of recent studio work;

    • three letters of recommendation;

    • a critical writing sample;

    • transcripts;

    • a portfolio of previous work dependent on the field of future study.

  • Applicants must present a portfolio with documentation of their artworks. Applicants will also include a fully annotated listing for all portfolio materials that provides detailed information about media, year of production, dimensions, part of a series, full running length (in the case of media artworks), and circumstances of display (in the case of installation works and performance works).

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a total of 6.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 4.5 FCEs from the approved course list for curatorial studies.

    • 0.5 FCE MVS Proseminars.

    • 1.5 FCEs in electives. Elective courses are selected in consultation with the student's advisor and are subject to the approval of the Program Director.

  • The internship requirement is normally completed during the Summer session between Year 1 and Year 2.

  • MVS Studio students are supervised by an Advisory Panel made up of the Director of the Visual Studies program (or designate), a studio faculty member of the MVS program who is considered the student's Principal Advisor, a second MVS studio faculty member, and another faculty member (not necessarily a member of the MVS program). The Final Studio Thesis defence requires an external reader chosen upon approval of the Principal Advisor and Program Director.

  • The graduating thesis project is composed of an exhibition and a qualifying paper.

  • An FZ (fail) in any one course or a B– grade in any two courses normally results in a recommendation to the School of Graduate Studies to terminate the student’s registration in the degree program.

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus project plus internship



Master of Visual Studies

Field: Curatorial Studies
Program Length: 5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Field: Studio
Program Length: 5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Architecture, Landscape, and Design
Architecture, Landscape, and Design: Visual Studies MVS Courses

MVS Curatorial Studies Courses

Course Code Course Title
VIS1000H (0.25 FCE) MVS Proseminar
VIS1004H
Internship
VIS1010H
Contemporary Art Since 1960
VIS1020H
Contemporary Art: Theory and Criticism
VIS1101H Paradigmatic Exhibitions: History, Theory, Criticism
VIS1102H
MVS Curatorial Research
VIS2000H (0.25 FCE) MVS Proseminar (prerequisite: VIS1000H)
VIS2002H
MVS Research and Writing
VIS2101Y
MVS Curatorial Studies Exhibition Project
VIS2102H
MVS Curatorial Studies Collaboration

MVS Studio Courses

Course Code Course Title
VIS1000H (0.25 FCE) MVS Proseminar
VIS1001H
Interdisciplinary Studio Practicum/Critiques I
VIS1003H
Interdisciplinary Studio Practicum/Critiques II
VIS1004H
Internship
VIS1010H
Contemporary Art Since 1960
VIS1020H
Contemporary Art: Theory and Criticism
VIS2000H (0.25 FCE) MVS Proseminar (prerequisite: VIS1000H)
VIS2001H
Studio Practicum/Critiques III
VIS2002H
MVS Research and Writing
VIS2003Y
MVS Project

MVS Elective Courses

Course Code Course Title
VIS3001H
Advanced Readings in Visual Studies
VIS3002H
Advanced Readings in Curatorial Studies
VIS3003H
Special Topics in Art and Culture
Architecture, Landscape, and Design
Art History: Art History MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

The MA program is a course-based and research-intensive degree designed to prepare art history students for doctoral research, curatorial work, art consultation, heritage programs, cultural journalism, and secondary school teaching.

The MA program can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Graduate Department of Art History's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Strong overall grade average in art history and closely related subjects and at least a B+ average in recent senior art history courses. Outstanding applicants with other backgrounds may be considered.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.0 graduate full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • Coursework must be chosen from at least three of four fields: 1) Ancient, 2) Medieval, 3) Early Modern, 4) Modern and Contemporary. No more than 2.0 FCEs may be taken in any one of the four fields.

    • Coursework must also be taken in at least two geographic zones (Western, East Asian, South Asian, African, etc.). Courses without a specific regional focus may count toward the geographical distribution requirement if the student's final paper is on an appropriate topic.

    • The equivalent of 1.0 FCE may be taken in another graduate department (for example, Medieval Studies, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations), subject to approval of the Department of Art History and the other department concerned.

  • Reading knowledge of a language other than English (normally French, German, Italian, Arabic, or Chinese); tested in the first session.

  • Orientation to Art Historical Research Methods, a workshop led by the Department of Art History's librarian, normally taken in Year 1.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S);
6 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework-only



Master of Arts
Program Length: 3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S); 6 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time


 

Art History
Art History: Art History MA, PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered each year. Check the departmental website for course availability under the current timetable.

Methods

Course Code Course Title
FAH1001H
Methods of Art History

Ancient

Course Code Course Title
FAH2018H
Art and the Aegean Bronze Age: Contemporary Perspectives
FAH2021H
Myth and Fantasy in Roman Painting
FAH2023H
Mind and Materiality: Views from Art History and Archaeology
FAH2025H
Visual Narrative and Time in Ancient Greek and Roman Art
FAH2027H
Women and Gender in Ancient Greece
FAH2028H
Art and the Philosophy of Time
FAH2029H The Art of Perception
FAH2034H
Topics in Roman Imperial Art
FAH2037H Empathy, Embodiment, and Emotion in Ancient Art
FAH2038H Greek and Roman Sculpture in the Royal Ontario Museum
FAH2060H Artisans and Artists in the Ancient Mediterranean

Medieval

Course Code Course Title
FAH1118H
The Medieval Treasury
FAH1119H
Global Medieval Art in China
FAH1125H
Medieval Pilgrimage Art and Architecture
FAH1127H
Early Medieval Art
FAH1130H Architecture of the Otherworld
FAH1175H Early Islamic Architecture: 7th–10th c.
FAH1176H History of Islamic Cairo (7th–16th c.)
FAH1177H Building the Islamic Empire: Architecture of the Umayyads

Early Modern

Course Code Course Title
FAH1202H
Correggio and the Problem of Italian Renaissance Art
FAH1204H
The Cassinese Art of Reform in Renaissance Italy
FAH1205H
Early Modern Intermediality
FAH1206H Artistic Localities in the Early Modern World
FAH1207H Formalism and Its Objects
FAH1210H Chinese Painting: Objects, Theories, Methods
FAH1220H Multi-Media Transmorphism
FAH1221H
Inside the Painter's Studio
FAH1229H
Architecture of the Global Renaissance
FAH1231H
Northern European Sculpture 1400–1600
FAH1232H Liquescent Art and Cultures

Modern and Contemporary

Course Code Course Title
FAH1411H Art and Analogy
FAH1457H Vernacular Photography
FAH1458H
Viewing History: The Visual Experience of the Past, 1750–1900
FAH1460H Wallace Berman and His Countercultural Circles
FAH1462H Photography and Scientific Representation in the 19th Century
FAH1463H Realisms
FAH1464H The Recalcitrant Icon
FAH1475H Picasso in View of Nanette
FAH1476H Surrealism and Art
FAH1482H The Time of Art History
FAH1486H
Bloomsbury and Vorticism
FAH1488H The Nature of Landscape
FAH1489H Re: Vision (Comparative Histories of the Senses)
FAH1490H Photography and the Occult
FAH1495H Art, Empire, Colonization
FAH1500H
Augmented Reality Art
FAH1755H Architecture and the Project of Industrial Modernity
FAH1756H Acoustic Space
FAH1757H Animal Images
FAH1758H What Images Do: Approaches From South Asia
FAH1759H Modern Architecture and Its Representations
FAH1801H
Portraiture in Canada: 1750–1870
FAH1920H
Primitivism to Globalism: Theories of Otherness in Modern and Contemporary Arts
FAH1921H
GeoAesthetics
FAH1922H Contemporary Art and Ethnography: Renewed Exchanges
FAH1934H Cosmopolitan/Comparative Modernisms
FAH1935H Contemporary Art Practices and the Modernist Archive
FAH1936H The Retro-Modern and the Time of the Contemporary
FAH1940H
Photography and Humour
FAH1951H
Contemporary Chinese Art and its Discontents
FAH1960H Indigenous Art, Land, and Material Relations in the Great Lakes
FAH1961H Art and Activism

Reading Courses

Course Code Course Title
FAH3000H
Special Studies in History of Art (only 1.0 FCE with this prefix is permitted in any one degree program)
FAH3011H
Readings in Ancient Art
FAH3012H
Readings in Medieval Art
FAH3013H
Readings in Renaissance and Baroque Art
FAH3014H
Readings in Modern and Contemporary Art
FAH5000Y
Comprehensive Examinations and Dissertation Topic Reading Course

Undergraduate/Graduate Courses

Periodically, the department may offer fourth-year undergraduate courses that have been recognized for graduate credit. Please visit the departmental website and discuss with the Graduate Coordinator.

Relevant Courses in Other Departments

Course Code Course Title
EAS1229H
Topics in Chinese Aesthetics
EAS1339H
Topics in Chinese Art Theories
MSL2240H
The Photographic Record
Art History
Art History: Art History PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The PhD program is designed to prepare art history students for college and university teaching, museum curatorships, and other research positions.

Applicants may enter the PhD program via one of two routes: 1) following completion of an appropriate master's degree or 2) direct entry after completing a bachelor's degree.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Graduate Department of Art History's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Minimum A– average in their master's program.

  • Reading knowledge of two foreign languages relevant to the student's research.

  • Students unable to meet language requirements for particular courses may be refused admission to courses; enrolment in Fall courses is limited and subject to instructor's approval.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) of graduate courses as follows:

    • FAH5000Y Comprehensive Examinations and Dissertation Topic Reading Course (1.0 FCE; Credit/No Credit) with the student's interim supervisor to prepare for the comprehensive examinations.

    • FAH1001H Methods of Art History (0.5 FCE), a departmental methodology course, must be taken in Year 1. With departmental approval, credit may be given for a research methodology course taken previously.

    • Students are encouraged to take courses reflecting a variety of time periods and geographic zones.

  • Orientation to Art Historical Research Methods, a workshop for new students, is recommended.

  • At the end of each academic year, students' progress will be reviewed to ensure that they have made satisfactory progress through the program; this includes maintaining full-time status with a GPA of at least A– and completion of all language requirements.

  • Students must pass examinations in two foreign languages by the end of Year 2. Students who have completed a language exam during their MA may apply to have the exam counted towards fulfilling one of the two foreign language requirements. The appropriate languages will be set by the interim supervisor in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies, and additional languages may be required depending on the research needs of the student's dissertation topic.

  • Within Years 1 and 2, students complete coursework and language requirements and secure a prospective supervisor with whom they will discuss plans for the comprehensive examinations.

  • Additionally, within Years 1 and 2, students must take a three-part comprehensive examination: 1) the first part focusing on one of the four fields, 2) the second on the student's dissertation field, and 3) the third (oral) discussing the first two.

    • The exam consists of an in-house written section, a take-home essay, and an oral exam.

    • The student will meet with the Examination Committee (normally made up of at least three members of the department, one of whom will be the prospective dissertation supervisor), in order to define the areas of the examination, the length of study, and such readings and special topics as deemed appropriate.

    • If a student fails the comprehensive examinations, one further attempt is allowed, no more than three months later. A second failure results in the immediate removal of the student from the program.

    • Once the student passes the exam, their graduate record will be updated to reflect successful exam completion.

  • Immediately following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students must formally establish their PhD Supervisory Committee. This will include the faculty member acting as the dissertation supervisor, and two other graduate faculty members. These arrangements must be approved by the department's Graduate Program Committee.

  • Working with the PhD Supervisory Committee, the student will develop a detailed proposal for their research, to be submitted 3 months after the successful completion of their comprehensive exam. The length and specific nature of the proposal will be determined by the Supervisory Committee and the PhD student. The drafted proposal must be approved, first by the Supervisory Committee, and then by the Director of Graduate Studies.

  • At some point during the dissertation stage, students will present their work to the faculty and students at a colloquium in an appropriate format and at a time to be determined by the supervisor in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies.

  • Normal timeline through the program: By the end of Year 1, students should have completed all course requirements for the degree. By the end of the following year of registration, students should satisfy any remaining requirements, select a thesis committee, pass the comprehensive examination, and submit a thesis proposal. Thereafter, the candidate selects a member of the thesis committee to be the thesis supervisor and begins work on their thesis.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Graduate Department of Art History's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants with a bachelor's degree who have an exceptionally strong academic record; minimum grade average of A– in art history and humanities courses in the last two years.

  • Reading knowledge of two foreign languages relevant to the student's research.

  • Students unable to meet language requirements for particular courses may be refused admission to courses; enrolment in Fall courses is limited and subject to instructor's approval.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete at least 5.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) in art history as follows:

    • FAH5000Y Comprehensive Examinations and Dissertation Topic Reading Course (1.0 FCE; Credit/No Credit) must be taken in Year 2 with the student's interim supervisor to prepare for the comprehensive examinations.

    • FAH1001H Methods of Art History (0.5 FCE), a departmental methodology course, must be taken in Years 1 and 2. With departmental approval, credit may be given for a research methodology course taken previously.

    • The remaining 4.0 FCEs must be chosen from at least three of the following fields: (1) Ancient, (2) Medieval, (3) Early Modern, 4) Modern and Contemporary. Any course that covers more than one of these time periods may only be used to fulfil one of the FCE distributions.

    • Coursework must be taken in at least two geographic zones (Western, East Asian, South Asian, African, etc.). Courses without a specific regional focus may count toward the geographical distribution requirement if the student's final paper is on an appropriate topic.

  • Students must maintain an A– average.

  • Orientation to Art Historical Research Methods, a workshop led by the Department of Art History's librarian, normally taken in Year 1.

  • Students must pass examinations in two foreign languages by the end of Year 2. Students focusing on Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance and Baroque will normally be expected to pass the examination in German as one of their two languages. The appropriate languages will be set by the interim supervisor in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies, and additional languages may be required depending on the research needs of the student's dissertation topic. Language requirements must be completed prior to approval of the dissertation proposal.

  • At the beginning of Year 3, students' progress will be reviewed to ensure that they have made satisfactory progress through the program; this includes maintaining full-time status with a GPA of at least A– and completion of all language requirements.

  • Within the first three years, students must take a three-part comprehensive examination: 1) the first part focusing on one of the four fields, 2) the second on the dissertation field, and 3) the third (oral) discussing the first two.

    • The exam consists of an in-house written section, a take-home essay, and an oral exam.

    • Upon the completion of all coursework, PhD students must seek out and secure the participation of a prospective supervisor with whom they will discuss plans for the comprehensive examinations.

    • The student will meet with the Examination Committee (normally made up of at least three members of the department, one of whom will be the prospective dissertation supervisor) in order to define the areas of the examination, the length of study, and such readings and special topics as deemed appropriate.

    • If a student fails the comprehensive examinations, one further attempt is allowed, no more than three months later. A second failure results in the immediate removal of the student from the program.

    • Once the student passes the exam, their graduate record will be updated to reflect successful exam completion.

  • Immediately following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students must formally establish their PhD Supervisory Committee. This will include the faculty member acting as the dissertation supervisor, and two other graduate faculty members. These arrangements must be approved by the department's Graduate Program Committee.

  • Working with the PhD Supervisory Committee, the student will develop a detailed proposal for their research, to be submitted 3 months after the successful completion of their comprehensive exam. The length and specific nature of the proposal will be determined by the Supervisory Committee and the PhD student. The drafted proposal must be approved, first by the Supervisory Committee, and then by the department's Director of Graduate Studies.

  • At some point during the dissertation stage, students will present their work to the faculty and students at a colloquium in an appropriate format and at a time to be determined by the supervisor in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies.

  • Normal timeline through the program: By the end of Year 2, students should have completed all course requirements for the degree. By the end of the following year of registration, students should satisfy any remaining requirements, select a thesis committee, pass the comprehensive examination, and submit a thesis proposal. Thereafter, the candidate selects a member of the thesis committee to be the thesis supervisor and begins work on their thesis.

Program Length

5 years (some students may take longer to complete the program)

Time Limit

7 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

 

Art History
Astronomy and Astrophysics: Astronomy and Astrophysics MSc

Master of Science

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants must hold an appropriate bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized university.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Because many universities do not offer extensive undergraduate training in astronomy and astrophysics, preparation in physics and mathematics is an acceptable background.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete 2.0 required full-course equivalents (FCEs): AST1501Y and AST1500Y, with different supervisors. Students are immediately engaged in original research throughout these two required research courses. An oral exam by committee is held for each. AST1501Y is normally completed during the Fall/Winter of Year 1, and AST1500Y is completed in the following Summer session.

  • Students must complete a minimum of 1.5 FCEs (three half courses) from the AST preparatory, elective, or specialized courses. More courses may be taken for credit or audited as appropriate.

  • Students are expected to attend the weekly general colloquium conducted by the department.

  • Residence. Students are normally expected to be on campus full-time for the duration of the program.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework-only



Master of Science
Program Length: 3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time


 

Astronomy and Astrophysics
Astronomy and Astrophysics: Astronomy and Astrophysics MSc, PhD Courses

Preparatory Courses

Course Code Course Title
AST1410H
Stars
AST1420H
Galactic Structure and Dynamics
AST1430H
Cosmology
AST1440H
Radiation Processes and Gas Dynamics

Research Courses

Course Code Course Title
AST1500Y+
Directed Research
AST1501Y
Introduction to Research
AST4000Y+
Research (students register in this 4000Y series each year, beginning in Year 2, in sequence of the last digit: 2, 3, etc.)
AST4002Y+
Research
AST4003Y+
Research
AST4004Y+
Research
AST4005Y+
Research
AST4006Y+
Research

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Elective Courses

Course Code Course Title
AST2010H
Physics of Stellar Atmospheres
AST2020H
Physics of Stellar Interiors
AST2040H
Extragalactic Astronomy
AST2050H
Observational Techniques

Specialized Courses

Course Code Course Title
AST3011H
Advanced Topics in Stellar and Galactic Astronomy II
AST3020H
Advanced Topics in Interstellar Matter and Star Formation I
AST3021H
Advanced Topics in Interstellar Matter and Star Formation II
AST3030H
Advanced Topics in Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology I
AST3031H
Advanced Topics in Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology II
AST3050Y
Theoretical Cosmology
AST3100H
Lecture Series in Specialized Topics (mini courses)
AST3101H (0.25 FCE) Specialized Topics in Astronomy and Astrophysics
Astronomy and Astrophysics
Astronomy and Astrophysics: Astronomy and Astrophysics PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics offers dynamic and competitive doctoral programs which emphasize research.

Students may be accepted into the PhD program via one of two routes: 1) following completion of an appropriate master's degree or 2) direct entry following completion of a bachelor's degree.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Applicants may be accepted into the PhD program following completion of an MSc degree in Astronomy and Astrophysics from the University of Toronto, or an MSc degree in another appropriate discipline or from elsewhere deemed equivalent, with an average of at least B+ or demonstrated comparable research competence.

Program Requirements

  • There is no minimum course requirement in the four-year program except for courses deemed necessary by the student's PhD supervisory or qualifying examination committees.

  • Students register in the AST4000Y Research course series (in sequence of the last digit: 2, 3, etc.) beginning in the Summer session of Year 1 and continue through the sequence through Year 4. The first registration, AST4002Y, corresponds to the qualifying examinations. The series continues with registration each Fall/Winter, starting with AST4003Y and is incremented by one digit each subsequent academic year. This registration is tied to thesis research progress, which is assessed based on the two required annual PhD supervisory committee meetings in October and April.

  • Students must successfully complete the two parts of the PhD qualifying examinations: literature-based and thesis proposal. Both are oral examinations conducted by a panel of faculty members.

    • The literature-based section evaluates the student's mastery of general astronomy and astrophysics and ability to apply that knowledge to understand relevant research literature.

    • The thesis proposal section evaluates the feasibility and value of the proposed thesis and verifies that the student has sufficient preparation in the relevant research area. It is based in part on a written summary of the proposed thesis provided by the student to the examiners.

The literature qualifying examinations are taken in parallel with the corresponding graduate course offering, with completion of the four sections by the end of Year 1. The thesis proposal examination is taken in the Summer session of Year 1. Students who fail at the first attempt have the opportunity to retake the examinations once, by the deadline of January 31 of Year 2.

  • A thesis embodying the results of original research, which must be submitted for appraisal in accordance with the regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.

  • Students are expected to attend the weekly general colloquium conducted by the department.

  • Residence. Students are normally expected to be on campus full-time for the duration of the program.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Students are accepted into the PhD program following completion of a bachelor's degree, with an average in the final two years equivalent to a University of Toronto A– or better from a recognized university.

  • Because many universities do not offer extensive undergraduate training in astronomy and astrophysics, preparation in physics and mathematics is an acceptable background.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs): AST1500Y and AST1501Y, with different supervisors. Students are immediately engaged in original research throughout these two required research courses. AST1501Y is normally completed during the Fall/Winter of Year 1, and AST1500Y is completed in the following Summer session. An oral exam by committee is held for each.

  • Students must complete a minimum of 2.5 FCEs (five half courses) from the AST preparatory, elective, or specialized courses. Students may petition the associate chair, graduate to include courses offered by a cognate department at the equivalent level. (A maximum of 1.0 FCE may be substituted.) More courses may be taken for credit or audited as appropriate.

  • Students register in the AST4000Y Research course series (in sequence of the last digit: 2, 3, etc,) beginning in the Summer session of Year 2 and continue the sequence through Year 5. The first registration, AST4002Y, corresponds to the qualifying examinations. The series continues with registration each Fall/Winter, starting with AST4003Y and is incremented by one digit each subsequent academic year. This registration is tied to thesis research progress, which is assessed based on the two required annual PhD supervisory committee meetings in October and April.

  • Students must successfully complete the two parts of the PhD qualifying examinations: literature-based and thesis proposal. Both are oral examinations conducted by a panel of faculty members.

    • The literature-based section evaluates the student's mastery of general astronomy and astrophysics and ability to apply that knowledge to understand relevant research literature.

    • The thesis proposal section evaluates the feasibility and value of the proposed thesis and verifies that the student has sufficient preparation in the relevant research area. It is based in part on a written summary of the proposed thesis provided by the student to the examiners.

The literature qualifying examinations are taken in parallel with the corresponding graduate course offering, with completion of the four sections by the end of Year 2. The thesis proposal examination is taken in the Summer session of Year 2. Students who fail at the first attempt have the opportunity to retake the examinations once, by the deadline of January 31 of Year 3.

  • A thesis embodying the results of original research, which must be submitted for appraisal in accordance with the regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.

  • Students are expected to attend the weekly general colloquium conducted by the department.

  • Residence. Students are normally expected to be on campus full-time for the duration of the program.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

 

Astronomy and Astrophysics
Biochemistry: Biochemistry MSc

Master of Science

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Biochemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Normally, a minimum B+ average in the last two years of study in an honours or specialist BSc program in biochemistry or molecular biology. Applicants with strong academic credentials in honours or specialist programs in disciplines related to biochemistry or molecular biology are also considered.

  • Applicants arrange for personal reference forms from three individuals familiar with their academic performance.

  • Applicants who obtained a degree outside Canada or the United States are generally required to have an MSc degree in Biochemistry or in a closely related subject area.

  • Applicants who obtained a degree outside Canada must arrange for general Graduate Record Examination (GRE) results to be sent to the department.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a non-Canadian university where the language of instruction was not English must provide Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and Test of Written English (TWE) scores:

    • paper-based TOEFL: minimum 580 score and 5 on the TWE

    • Internet-based TOEFL: minimum 93/120 score and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • In the absence of TOEFL results, an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of at least 7.0 (Academic) with at least 6.5 for each component is also acceptable.

Program Requirements

Students must complete any courses that were a condition of acceptance.

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 1.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • BCH2020Y0 Seminar Course in Biochemistry Level 1 (1.0 FCE)

    • BCH2101H Scientific Skills for Biochemists (0.25 FCE)

    • at least 0.25 elective FCE.

  • Students must submit a thesis (RST9999Y; Credit/No Credit) and successfully complete an oral examination on their research and related aspects of biochemistry.

  • Normally, MSc students are expected to participate as full-time students and to maintain full-time status in their laboratories until thesis completion and final defence.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)**

Time Limit

3 years full-time

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

** Students may begin the program in the Fall or Winter.

Coursework plus thesis



Master of Science
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Biochemistry
Biochemistry: Biochemistry MSc, PhD Courses

For course details and availability, consult the Biochemistry website.

Course Code Course Title
BCH2020Y0
Seminar Course in Biochemistry Level 1 (Credit/No Credit)
BCH2022Y0
Seminar Course in Biochemistry Level 2 (Credit/No Credit)
BCH2024H0
Focused Topics in Biochemistry
JBB2025H
Protein Crystallography — Lectures
JBB2026H
Protein Structure, Folding, and Design
JBL1507H
Biochemistry of Inherited Disease
JNP1017H+
Current Topics in Molecular and Biochemical Toxicology
JNP1018H+
Molecular and Biochemical Basis of Toxicology
JNR1444Y
Fundamentals of Neuroscience: Cellular and Molecular — Lectures (PSL444Y)§

Modular Courses

Each modular course is worth 0.25 full-course equivalent (FCE).

Course Code Course Title
BCH2101H Scientific Skills for Biochemists
BCH2102H Biomolecular Dynamics and Function
BCH2103H Current Topics in Prion Biology
BCH2104H The Biochemistry of Translational Medicine
BCH2105H Cystic Fibrosis: The Cause, The Treatment
BCH2106H Membrane Proteomics in Biomedical Research
BCH2107H Introduction to Biomolecular Simulations
BCH2109H Engineering Vaccines: Development to Deployment
BCH2110H Eukaryotic Signaling
BCH2111H Post-transcriptional Control of Gene Expression
BCH2112H From Chaperones to CRISPR-Cas: the Incredible Genius of Phages
BCH2113H Advances in Precision Medicine
BCH2114H Frontiers in Drug Discovery
BCH2115H Applying Modern Evolutionary Thinking to Biochemistry, Cell, and Molecular Biology
BCH2116H Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Modern Life Sciences
BCH2119H Advances in Epigenetics
BCH2120H Studies of Tissue Barriers: Regulation of Phenotype and Transport Across the Epithelium and Endothelium
BCH2121H Lipid Metabolism in Health and Disease: Mechanisms of Diabetic Dyslipidemia in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes
BCH2122H The Use of High Content Screening in Biomolecular Medicine
BCH2123H Protein Structure Prediction and Homology Modelling
BCH2124H Molecular Chaperones and Cellular Protein Homeostasis
BCH2125H Structure and Dynamics of Biomacromolecules Using Solid State NMR Spectroscopy
BCH2126H Subcellular Social Networks: Inter-Organelle Contact Sites
BCH2127H Advances in Optical Microscopy: From Single Molecules to Four-Dimensional Imaging
BCH2128H Scientific Thinking and Practice
BCH2129H Genome Instability: Basic Science to Human Disease
BCH2130H Cancer Biology
BCH2131H Genomics of Infectious Disease
BCH2132H Modelling Human Diseases from Cells to Organoids
BCH2133H Tyrosine Kinase Signaling
BCH2134H Cytoskeletal Dynamics
BCH2135H Mitochondria and Metabolism in Human Health and Disease
BCH2136H Biological Condensates
BCH2137H Bug v. Host
BCH2138H Advanced Electron Microscopy
BCH2139H Islet Biology I: Gene to Cell to Organ to Disease
BCH2140H Islet Biology II: Beyond Glucose Control: Molecular Targets, Diagnostics and Cutting-Edge Technologies
BCH2141H Advanced Methods in Biomolecular Interactions
BCH2200H Design Thinking for Scientists
BCH2201H Professional Development
BCH2202H Intro Programming in R
BCH2203H Intro Programming in Python
BCH2204H Advanced Programming in R
BCH2205H Advanced Programming in Python
BCH2206H Interdisciplinary Science
BCH2207H Collaborative Science: Student Centered Interdisciplinary Studies

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed, or credit is given when the course is completed.

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

§ Arts and Science undergraduate course.

Biochemistry
Biochemistry: Biochemistry PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Students are accepted into the PhD program via one of three routes: 1) following completion of an MSc degree in biochemistry or a cognate discipline; 2) transfer (reclassification) from the University of Toronto MSc program; or 3) following completion of a BSc degree (direct entry) if, in the opinion of the Biochemistry Graduate Committee, the student has an outstanding academic record.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Biochemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants must arrange for personal reference forms from three individuals familiar with their academic performance.

  • Applicants are generally required to have an MSc degree in biochemistry or in a closely related subject area with high academic standing.

  • Applicants who obtained a degree outside of Canada must arrange for General Record Examination (GRE) results to be sent to the department.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a non-Canadian university where the language of instruction was not English must provide Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and Test of Written English (TWE) scores:

    • paper-based TOEFL: minimum 580 score and 5 on the TWE

    • Internet-based TOEFL: minimum 93/120 score and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • In the absence of TOEFL results, an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of at least 7.0 (Academic) with at least 6.5 for each component is also acceptable.

Program Requirements

Students must complete any courses that were a condition of acceptance.

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • BCH2022Y0 Seminar Course in Biochemistry Level 2 (1.0 FCE)

    • BCH2101H Scientific Skills for Biochemists (0.25 FCE). If previously taken students must take a substitute 0.25 FCE course approved by the graduate coordinator.

    • 0.75 elective FCE.

  • Students must successfully complete a qualifying examination within the first 24 months (ideally 18 months) of the program. To be eligible to write this qualifying examination, students must:

    • complete BCH2101H

    • be concurrently registered in BCH2022Y0

    • complete at least 0.25 elective FCE; after completing the qualifying examination, students must complete the remaining 0.5 elective FCE.

  • Submit a thesis (RST9999Y; Credit/No Credit) and defend it at the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Normally, PhD students are expected to participate as full-time students and to maintain full-time status in their laboratories until thesis completion and final defence.

Program Length

4 years full-time

Time Limit

6 years full-time

0 Course that may continue over a program. Credit is given when the course is completed.

 

PhD Program (Transfer)

Transfer Requirements

  • Transfer applicants must be enrolled in the MSc program in Biochemistry. Excellent students with high academic standing, who have clearly demonstrated the ability to do research at the doctoral level, may be considered for transfer to the PhD program. Recommendation by the student’s supervisory committee is required.

  • Transfer applicants must successfully complete a reclassification (transfer) examination within 18 to 24 months of starting the program.

Program Requirements

Students must complete any courses that were a condition of acceptance.

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • BCH2020Y0 Seminar Course in Biochemistry Level 1 (1.0 FCE)

    • BCH2022Y0 Seminar Course in Biochemistry Level 2 (1.0 FCE)

    • BCH2101H Scientific Skills for Biochemists (0.25 FCE)

    • 1.25 elective FCEs.

  • To be eligible to write the reclassification examination, students must:

    • complete BCH2101H

    • be concurrently registered in BCH2022Y0

    • complete at least 0.25 elective FCE; after completing the reclassification examination, students must complete the remaining 1.0 elective FCE.

  • Submit a thesis (RST9999Y; Credit/No Credit) and defend it at the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Normally, PhD students are expected to participate as full-time students and to maintain full-time status in their laboratories until thesis completion and final defence.

Program Length

5 years full-time

Time Limit

7 years full-time

0 Course that may continue over a program. Credit is given when the course is completed.

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Direct entry is available to highly qualified BSc graduates who completed a Biochemistry specialist program or an appropriate undergraduate program in the life sciences from a recognized university, with a minimum A average in the final two years and relevant research experience.

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Biochemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants must arrange for personal reference forms from three individuals familiar with their academic performance.

  • Applicants who obtained a degree outside Canada or the United States are generally required to have an MSc degree in biochemistry or in a closely related subject area with high academic standing.

  • Applicants who obtained a degree outside of Canada must arrange for General Record Examination (GRE) results to be sent to the department.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a non-Canadian university where the language of instruction was not English must provide Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and Test of Written English (TWE) scores:

    • paper-based TOEFL: minimum 580 score and 5 on the TWE

    • Internet-based TOEFL: minimum 93/120 score and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • In the absence of TOEFL results, an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of at least 7.0 (Academic) with at least 6.5 for each component is also acceptable.

Program Requirements

Students must complete any courses that were a condition of acceptance.

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • BCH2020Y0 Seminar Course in Biochemistry Level 1 (1.0 FCE)

    • BCH2022Y0 Seminar Course in Biochemistry Level 2 (1.0 FCE)

    • BCH2101H Scientific Skills for Biochemists (0.25 FCE)

    • 1.25 elective FCEs.

  • Students must successfully complete a qualifying examination within 18 to 24 months of the program. To be eligible to write this qualifying examination, students must:

    • complete BCH2101H

    • be concurrently registered in BCH2020Y0

    • complete at least 0.25 elective FCE; after completing the qualifying exam, students must complete the remaining 1.0 elective FCE.

  • Submit a thesis (RST9999Y; Credit/No Credit) and defend it at the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Normally, PhD students are expected to participate as full-time students and to maintain full-time status in their laboratories until thesis completion and final defence.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

0 Course that may continue over a program. Credit is given when the course is completed.

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years;
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Transfer)
Program Length: 5 years;
Time Limit: 7 years

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years;
Time Limit: 7 years
 

Biochemistry
Bioethics: Courses

Please note that these courses are not offered every year. Consult each unit's website for details.

Health Policy, Management and Evaluation

Course Code Course Title
HAD5011H
Canada's Health Care System and Health Policy
HAD5306H
Introduction to Health Services Research and the Use of Health Administrative Data
HAD5741H
Health Law and Ethics
HAD5771H
Resource Allocation Ethics

Law

Participation in LAW courses is at the discretion of the Faculty of Law upon presentation, to the Faculty of Law Records Office, of a signed permission form from the student's home graduate unit. Note that preference is given to JD students and that many LAW courses are full by the end of the Faculty of Law add/drop period.

Course Code Course Title
LAW6003Y
Health Law and Bioethics
LAW6006H
Public Health Law
LAW582H
Privacy, Property, and the Human Body

Nursing Science

Course Code Course Title
NUR1021H
Nursing Ethics

Philosophy

Course Code Course Title
PHL2131H
Ethics
PHL2132H
Seminar in Ethics
PHL2133H
Topics in Ethics

Public Health Sciences

Course Code Course Title
CHL3001Y
Core Topics in Bioethics
CHL3002Y
Teaching Bioethics
CHL3003Y
Empirical Approaches in Bioethics
CHL3004Y
Ethics and Health Institutions
CHL3051H
Research Ethics
CHL5121H
Genomics, Bioethics, and Public Policy
CHL5401H
Epidemiologic Methods I
JRH5124H
Public Health Ethics

Social Work

Course Code Course Title
SWK6308H
Designing and Implementing Quantitative Social Work Research
Bioethics (Collaborative Specialization)
Bioethics: Doctoral Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants to the collaborative specialization must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and a graduate degree program in one of the collaborating graduate units.

  • Students interested in the doctoral programs apply to both the collaborating graduate unit and the Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics. Applications for admission to the collaborative specialization are considered only after admission to the collaborating graduate unit. If a student applies to more than one unit, a copy of each file must be submitted to the collaborative specialization at the contact above.

  • Visit the Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics website for the application form and details about supporting documentation. The application must be accompanied by:

    • application form

    • an up-to-date curriculum vitae (CV)

    • up-to-date copies of all transcripts

    • a one-page letter of intent

    • two letters of reference

  • For the doctoral thesis, an email or note from the proposed supervisor indicating willingness to supervise the student should be submitted to the Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics at the contact above. The JCB website lists faculty and bioethicists who are available for advice relating to research proposals.

Specialization Requirements

  • Students will be expected to meet the requirements of the home graduate unit as well as those of the Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics. Students should check with their home graduate program whether the collaborative specialization course requirements may be counted towards the degree.

  • Students must complete:

    • SRD4444Y, a credit/no credit graduate seminar series in bioethics.

    • PHL2145H, a review of the philosophical foundations of bioethics. Students who have completed an equivalent graduate course in philosophical bioethics may apply to the collaborative specialization director to have this requirement waived.

    • Bioethics-related 0.5 full-course equivalent (FCE), normally from the suggested list below.

  • All doctoral candidates must complete a thesis. The thesis will be supervised by a thesis committee comprising a supervisor and normally two other members, at least one of whom is identified as an affiliated Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics faculty member. The thesis is evaluated according to the procedures and standards of the home graduate unit and must fall within the broad area of bioethics.

Bioethics (Collaborative Specialization)
Bioethics: Master's Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants to the collaborative specialization must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and a graduate degree program in one of the collaborating graduate units.

  • Students interested in the master's programs apply to both the collaborating graduate unit and the Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics. Applications for admission to the collaborative specialization are considered only after admission to the collaborating graduate unit. If a student applies to more than one unit, a copy of each file must be submitted to the collaborative specialization at the contact above.

  • Visit the Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics website for the application form and details about supporting documentation. The application must be accompanied by:

    • application form

    • an up-to-date curriculum vitae (CV)

    • up-to-date copies of all transcripts

    • a one-page letter of intent

    • two letters of reference.

  • Where a thesis is required, an email or note from the proposed supervisor indicating willingness to supervise the student should be submitted to the Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics at the contact above. The JCB website lists faculty and bioethicists who are available for advice relating to research proposals.

Specialization Requirements

  • Students will be expected to meet the requirements of the home graduate unit as well as those of the Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics. Students should check with their home graduate program whether the collaborative specialization course requirements may be counted towards the degree.

  • Students must complete:

    • SRM3333Y, a credit/no credit graduate seminar series in bioethics.

    • PHL2145H, a review of the philosophical foundations of bioethics. Students who have completed an equivalent graduate course in philosophical bioethics may apply to the Program Director to have this requirement waived.

    • Bioethics-related 0.5 full-course equivalent (FCE), normally from the suggested list below.

  • Master's programs require either a thesis or equivalent research project as determined by the home unit. The thesis will be supervised by a thesis committee comprising a supervisor and two other members, at least one of whom is identified as an affiliated Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics faculty member. The thesis is evaluated according to the procedures and standards of the home graduate unit and must fall within the broad area of bioethics. Non-thesis projects require supervision; requirements for such projects will be determined by the home unit. Students in coursework-only degree programs must complete additional coursework in approved bioethics electives. For the Master of Laws (LLM) coursework-only option, 1.0 FCE in additional courses in bioethics are required.

Bioethics (Collaborative Specialization)
Biomedical Engineering: Biomedical Engineering MASc

Master of Applied Science

Program Description

The Master of Applied Science (MASc) program is a research-stream, thesis-based program which provides a strong academic foundation for students who want to become immersed in the discipline of biomedical engineering. This program is designed to offer students challenging and rewarding research opportunities within the context of using engineering principles to enhance the quality of our health-care system.

The MASc program is offered in the fields of 1) Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; 2) Engineering in a Clinical Setting; 3) Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging and Systems Biology; and 4) Neural/Sensory Systems and Rehabilitation.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the institute’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A bachelor's degree in dentistry, engineering, medicine, or one of the physical or biological sciences from a recognized university with a minimum academic standing of mid-B or 3.0 grade point average (GPA) in the final two years of study or over senior-level courses.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. The program normally comprises at least 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • Two of the following (1.0 FCE):

      • BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution (0.5 FCE)

      • BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers (0.5 FCE)

      • BME1479H Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers (0.5 FCE)

    • Two half-course electives relevant to the student's area of research (1.0 FCE).

  • Students must participate in:

    • Either BME1010H or BME1011H Graduate Seminar series (0.0 FCE).

    • JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE).

    • Health and safety training workshops.

  • Successful completion of a research thesis in at least one of the biomedical engineering research fields: 1) Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; 2) Engineering in a Clinical Setting; 3) Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging and Systems Biology; and 4) Neural/Sensory Systems and Rehabilitation.

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis



Master of Applied Science
Program Length: 5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time


 

Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering: Biomedical Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD, Clinical Engineering MHSc Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Students should contact the BME office for information about course availability. Outlines of these and other closely related courses may be obtained from the BME office.

Course Code Course Title
BME1010H
Graduate Seminar
BME1011H
Graduate Seminar
BME1405H
Clinical Engineering Instrumentation I
BME1436H
Clinical Engineering Surgery
BME1439H
Clinical Engineering Instrumentation II
BME1453H Genomics and Synthetic Nucleic-Acid Technologies
BME1454H
Regenerative Medicine: Fundamentals and Applications
BME1457H Biomedical Nanotechnology
BME1459H
Protein Engineering
BME1460H
Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy: Theory and Application to Live Cell Imaging
BME1462H
Biological Image Analysis
BME1466H
Advanced Topics on Magnetic Resonance Imaging
BME1471H
Rehabilitation Engineering
BME1472H
Fundamentals of Neuromodulation Technology and Clinical Applications
BME1473H
Acquisition and Processing of Bioelectric Signals
BME1477H
Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution
BME1478H
Coding for Biomedical Engineers
BME1479H
Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers
BME1480H Experimental Design and Multivariate Analysis in Bioengineering
BME1500H Topics in Neuromodulation
BME1510H
Data Science for Biomedical Engineers
(recommended prerequisites: BME1478H, BME1479H)
BME1800H
Biomedical Product Development I
BME1801H
Biomedical Product Development II
BME1802H
Applying Human Factors to the Design of Medical Devices
BME1898Y
Practical Experience in Applied Research PT
BME1899Y
Practical Experience in Applied Research FT
BME4444Y
Practical Experience Course
APS1043H Writing Your Own Patent Application
CHE1334H Organ-on-a-Chip Engineering
JCB1349H
Molecular Assemblies: Structure/Function/Properties
JEB1433H
Medical Imaging
JEB1444H
Neural Engineering
JEB1447H
Sensory Communications
JMB1050H
Biological and Bio-inspired Materials
BME/JPB1022H
Human Physiology as Related to Engineering II
JPB1071H Advanced Topics: Computational Neuroscience
JTC1331H
Biomaterials Science
Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering: Biomedical Engineering MEng

​Master of Engineering​

Program Description

The Master of Engineering (MEng) program is an accelerated, professional program with a focus on the design and commercialization of biomedical devices. Students will have the opportunity to take on applied design challenges and meet the growing demands of this industry through a four-month practical experience through internships, research projects, or practical course activities.

The MEng program is offered in the fields of 1) Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; 2) Engineering in a Clinical Setting; 3) Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging and Systems Biology; and 4) Neural/Sensory Systems and Rehabilitation.

The MEng program can be taken on a full-time, extended full-time, or part-time basis.

 

Full-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants ​are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy IBME’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • ​A four-year bachelor's degree in engineering, medicine, dentistry, or one of the physical or biological sciences from a recognized university, with at least a mid-B average (3.0 grade point average [GPA]) in the final two years of study or over senior-level courses.

Program Requirements

  • ​​​Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • ​At least 2.0 FCEs in biomedical engineering courses; these include all BME and joint BME course offerings.

    • At least 1.0 FCE in commercialization and entrepreneurship courses such as BME1800H, BME1801H, BME1802H, and BME1405H.

    • A 1.0 FCE Practical Experience in Applied Research course in biomedical device development, usually over one session for a full-time placement (BME1899Y) or over three sessions for a part-time placement (BME1898Y). The placement must be in at least one of the following biomedical engineering research fields: 1) Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; 2) Engineering in a Clinical Setting; 3) Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging and Systems Biology; or 4) Neural/Sensory Systems and Rehabilitation. The practical experience course can be taken in academic research and teaching laboratories, government institutions, health-care facilities, in the industry, or in health-care consulting firms.

    • The remaining 1.0 FCE can be two half courses in either biomedical engineering, commercialization and entrepreneurship, or any graduate-level course the student is interested in.

  • All courses must be at the graduate level, which includes both 500- and 1000-level. Students can take a maximum of one 500-level course.

  • Health and safety training workshops.​

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE);​ or Forensic Engineering as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Biomedical Engineering MEng Emphases section.

Program Length

3 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)

Time Limit

​2 years

 

Extended Full-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants ​are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy IBME’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • ​A four-year bachelor's degree in engineering, medicine, dentistry, or one of the physical or biological sciences from a recognized university, with at least a mid-B average (3.0 grade point average [GPA]) in the final two years of study or over senior-level courses.

Program Requirements

  • ​​​Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • ​At least 2.0 FCEs in biomedical engineering courses; these include all BME and joint BME course offerings.

    • At least 1.0 FCE in commercialization and entrepreneurship courses such as BME1800H, BME1801H, BME1802H, and BME1405H.

    • A 1.0 FCE Practical Experience in Applied Research course in biomedical device development, usually over one session for a full-time placement (BME1899Y) or over three sessions for a part-time placement (BME1898Y). The placement must be in at least one of the following biomedical engineering research fields: 1) Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; 2) Engineering in a Clinical Setting; 3) Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging and Systems Biology; or 4) Neural/Sensory Systems and Rehabilitation. The practical experience course can be taken in academic research and teaching laboratories, government institutions, health-care facilities, in the industry, or in health-care consulting firms.

    • The remaining 1.0 FCE can be two half courses in either biomedical engineering, commercialization and entrepreneurship, or any graduate-level course the student is interested in.

  • All courses must be at the graduate level, which includes both 500- and 1000-level. Students can take a maximum of one 500-level course.

  • Health and safety training workshops.​

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE);​ or Forensic Engineering as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Biomedical Engineering MEng Emphases section.

Program Length

6 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)

Time Limit

​3 years

 

Part-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants ​are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy IBME’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • ​A four-year bachelor's degree in engineering, medicine, dentistry, or one of the physical or biological sciences from a recognized university, with at least a mid-B average (3.0 grade point average [GPA]) in the final two years of study or over senior-level courses.

Program Requirements

  • ​​​Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • ​At least 2.0 FCEs in biomedical engineering courses; these include all BME and joint BME course offerings.

    • At least 1.0 FCE in commercialization and entrepreneurship courses such as BME1800H, BME1801H, BME1802H, and BME1405H.

    • A 1.0 FCE Practical Experience in Applied Research course in biomedical device development, usually over one session for a full-time placement (BME1899Y) or over three sessions for a part-time placement (BME1898Y). The placement must be in at least one of the following biomedical engineering research fields: 1) Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; 2) Engineering in a Clinical Setting; 3) Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging and Systems Biology; or 4) Neural/Sensory Systems and Rehabilitation. The practical experience course can be taken in academic research and teaching laboratories, government institutions, health-care facilities, in the industry, or in health-care consulting firms.

    • The remaining 1.0 FCE can be two half courses in either biomedical engineering, commercialization and entrepreneurship, or any graduate-level course the student is interested in.

  • All courses must be at the graduate level, which includes both 500- and 1000-level. Students can take a maximum of one 500-level course.

  • Health and safety training workshops.​

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE);​ or Forensic Engineering as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Biomedical Engineering MEng Emphases section.

Program Length

9 sessions part-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S/F/W/S)

Time Limit

​6 years

Coursework plus placement



Master of Engineering
Program Length: 3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S); 6 sessions extended full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S); 9 sessions part-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S/F/W/S)
Time Limit: 2 years full-time; 3 years extended full-time; 6 years part-time

Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering: Biomedical Engineering MEng Emphases

Emphasis: Engineering and Globalization (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete four half courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) from the following lists, with at least two half courses (or one full course) taken from Group A.

Group A

APS510H, APS530H, APS1420H, JCR1000Y (full-year course).

Group B

APS1015H, APS1020H, APS1024H, CHL5700H, CIV1399H, JMG2020H.

Note: Students who choose to pursue an MEng project in their home department that aligns with the Centre for Global Engineering (CGEN)'s disciplinary focus, as deemed by the CGEN Director, may count the project as one required Group B course.

Students who complete the requirements of the emphasis in Engineering and Globalization and wish to obtain a notation on their transcript should contact the Faculty Graduate Studies office.

 

Emphasis: Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE) (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete any four of the following courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]):

Leadership

TEP1010H, TEP1011H, TEP1026H, TEP1027H, TEP1029H, TEP1030H, TEP1501H, TEP1502H, TEP1601H.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

APS1012H, APS1013H, APS1015H, APS1023H, APS1033H, APS1035H, APS1036H, APS1041H, APS1061H, APS1088H.

Finance and Management

AER1601H, APS502H, APS1001H, APS1004H, APS1005H, APS1009H, APS1016H, APS1017H, APS1020H, APS1022H, APS1028H, APS1032H, APS1038H, APS1039H, APS1040H, APS1043H, APS1049H, APS1050H, APS1051H, APS1052H.

Engineering and Society

APS510H, APS1018H, APS1024H, APS1025H, APS1031H, APS1034H, APS1101H, APS1420H.

 

Emphasis: Forensic Engineering (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete four courses (one core course and three elective courses).

Core Course

MSE1031H Forensic Engineering.

Elective Courses

AER1604H,
APS1034H, APS1039H, APS1040H, APS1101H,
BME1480H, BME1800H, BME1801H, BME1802H,
CHE561H, CHE568H, CHE1213H, CHE1431H, CHE1432H, CHE1434H, CHE1436H,
CIV510H, CIV518H, CIV1163H, CIV1171H, CIV1174H, CIV1190H, CIV1201H, CIV1279H, CIV1282H, CIV1422H, CIV1429H,
JMB1050H,
JNC2503H,
MIE507H, MIE533H, MIE566H, MIE1301H, MIE1303H, MIE1411H, MIE1414H, MIE1514H, MIE1616H, MIE17108H, MIE1713H, MIE1714H, MIE1721H, MIE1723H, MIE1727H, MIE1804H,
MSE1015H, MSE1016H, MSE1022H, MSE1032H, MSE1067H.

Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering: Biomedical Engineering PhD; Field: 5 Clinical Engineering

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The PhD program offers courses and a strong research thesis component. Students emerge from this program ready to pursue careers in academia, medicine, industry, and government. Students with a particular interest in conducting biomedical engineering research with a primary clinical focus may pursue a field in clinical engineering within the Biomedical Engineering PhD program.

Applicants may enter the PhD program via one of three routes: 1) following completion of an appropriate master's degree; 2) transfer from the University of Toronto MASc or MHSc program; or 3) direct entry following completion of an appropriate bachelor's degree.

 

Field: Clinical Engineering

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the institute’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants must have a master's degree in dentistry, engineering, medicine, or one of the physical or biological sciences with an overall average of at least B+ (3.3 grade point average [GPA]) from a recognized university.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Normally, students must complete at least 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) including:

    • Two of the following (1.0 FCE):

      • BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution (0.5 FCE);

      • BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers (0.5 FCE); or

      • BME1479H Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers (0.5 FCE)

    • If a student does not have a formal degree in clinical engineering, 0.5 FCE from one of the BME clinical engineering courses (BME1405H, BME1436H, BME1439H, or BME4444Y) is required. A student who possesses protracted professional engineering experience (five or more years) will be exempt from this requirement.

  • Students must (1) conduct their research in a clinical environment and (2) be co-supervised by both engineering and health science faculty. The primary supervisor must be BME-appointed; however, the co-supervisor could be from a clinical unit other than BME but must be appointed to SGS.

  • Within 12 months of registration, students must pass a qualifying examination covering the broad field of biomedical engineering appropriate to their background.

  • Successful completion of a thesis, representing an original investigation in biomedical engineering.

  • Students will continue to meet with their supervisory committee at least once every 12 months until recommendation for the departmental oral examination is made. On the recommendation of the supervisory committee and special approval from their department Graduate Chair or Coordinator, candidates have the opportunity to waive the departmental oral examination and proceed directly to the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Students must participate in:

    • Either BME1010H or BME1011H Graduate Seminar series (0.0 FCE);

    • JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE);

    • Health and safety training workshops.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Transfer)

Transfer Requirements

  • Highly qualified master’s students (MHSc students in Clinical Engineering or MASc students in any field) may be considered for transfer into the PhD program in any of the five research fields. To be eligible to transfer to the PhD, Clinical Engineering MHSc students must complete 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) within the MHSc curriculum.

  • MHSc students who transfer to the PhD in the field of Clinical Engineering must fulfil the PhD program requirements listed below. MHSc students who transfer to the other PhD fields must fulfil the program requirements of the PhD field as described in the applicable section.

Program Requirements for MASc Transfer Students

  • Coursework. Students who transfer from the MASc program in Biomedical Engineering must complete the total course requirements for both degrees: 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) at the master’s level plus 1.0 FCE at the PhD level, for a total of 3.0 FCEs.

    • Students must complete two of the following (1.0 FCE):

      • BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution (0.5 FCE);

      • BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers (0.5 FCE); or

      • BME1479H Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers (0.5 FCE).

    • Elective courses relevant to the student's area of research (2.0 FCEs).

    • If a student does not have a formal degree in clinical engineering, 0.5 FCE from one of the BME clinical engineering courses (BME1405H, BME1436H, BME1439H, or BME4444Y) is required. A student who possesses protracted professional engineering experience (five or more years) will be exempt from this requirement.

Program Requirements for MHSc Transfer Students

  • Coursework. Students who transfer from the MHSc program in Biomedical Engineering must complete the total course requirements for both degrees: 4.0 FCEs at the master's level plus 1.0 FCE at the PhD level, for a total of 5.0 FCEs.

    • BME1405H Clinical Engineering Instrumentation I (0.5 FCE) and BME1436H Clinical Engineering Surgery (0.5 FCE).

    • Students must complete two of the following (1.0 FCE):

      • BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution (0.5 FCE);

      • BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers (0.5 FCE); or

      • BME1479H Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers (0.5 FCE);

    • Two half-course electives relevant to the student's area of research (1.0 FCE).

    • BME4444Y Practical Experience Course (1.0 FCE) in health-care facilities, the medical device industry, or health-care consulting firms. The practical experience course must total a minimum of 625 hours.

    • If a student does not have a formal degree in clinical engineering, 0.5 FCE from one of the BME clinical engineering courses (BME1405H, BME1436H, BME1439H, or BME4444Y) is required. A student who possesses protracted professional engineering experience (five or more years) will be exempt from this requirement.

All PhD Students

  • Students must (1) conduct their research in a clinical environment and (2) be co-supervised by both engineering and health science faculty. The primary supervisor must be BME-appointed; however, the co-supervisor could be from a clinical unit other than BME but must be appointed to SGS.

  • Within 12 months of registration, students must pass a qualifying examination covering the broad field of biomedical engineering appropriate to their background.

  • Successful completion of a thesis, representing an original investigation in biomedical engineering.

  • Students will continue to meet with their supervisory committee at least once every 12 months until recommendation for the departmental oral examination is made. On the recommendation of the supervisory committee and special approval from their department Graduate Chair or Coordinator, candidates have the opportunity to waive the departmental oral examination and proceed directly to the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Students must participate in:

    • Either BME1010H or BME1011H Graduate Seminar series (0.0 FCE);

    • JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE);

    • Health and safety training workshops.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the institute’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Direct entry with a bachelor's degree may be considered in exceptional cases. Applicants must have an undergraduate degree in dentistry, engineering, medicine, or one of the physical or biological sciences.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Normally, students must complete 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • Two of the following (1.0 FCE):

      • BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution (0.5 FCE);

      • BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers (0.5 FCE); or

      • BME1479H Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers (0.5 FCE).

    • Elective courses relevant to the student's area of research (2.0 FCEs).

    • If a student does not have a formal degree in clinical engineering, 0.5 FCE from one of the BME clinical engineering courses (BME1405H, BME1436H, BME1439H, or BME4444Y) is required. A student who possesses protracted professional engineering experience (five or more years) will be exempt from this requirement.

  • Students in the Clinical Engineering field must (1) conduct their research in a clinical environment and (2) be co-supervised by both engineering and health science faculty. The primary supervisor must be BME-appointed; however, the co-supervisor could be from a clinical unit other than BME but must be appointed to SGS.

  • Within 12 months of registration, students must pass a qualifying examination covering the broad field of biomedical engineering appropriate to their background.

  • Successful completion of a thesis, representing an original investigation in biomedical engineering.

  • Students will continue to meet with their supervisory committee at least once every 12 months until recommendation for the departmental oral examination is made. On the recommendation of the supervisory committee and special approval from their department Graduate Chair or Coordinator, candidates have the opportunity to waive the departmental oral examination and proceed directly to the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Students must participate in:

    • Either BME1010H or BME1011H Graduate Seminar series (0.0 FCE);

    • JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE);

    • Health and safety training workshops.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Transfer)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering: Biomedical Engineering PhD; Fields: 1 Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine; 2 Engineering in a Clinical Setting; 3 Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging & Systems Biology; 4 Neural/Sensory Systems & Rehabilitation

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The PhD program offers courses and a strong research thesis component. Students emerge from this program ready to pursue careers in academia, medicine, industry, and government. Students with a particular interest in conducting biomedical engineering research with a primary clinical focus may pursue a field in clinical engineering within the Biomedical Engineering PhD program.

Applicants may enter the PhD program via one of three routes: 1) following completion of an appropriate master's degree; 2) transfer from the University of Toronto MASc or MHSc program; or 3) direct entry following completion of an appropriate bachelor's degree.

 

Fields:

1) Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine;
2) Engineering in a Clinical Setting;
3) Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging and Systems Biology;
4) Neural/Sensory Systems and Rehabilitation

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the institute’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants must have a master's degree in dentistry, engineering, medicine, or one of the physical or biological sciences with an overall average of at least B+ (3.3 grade point average [GPA]) from a recognized university.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Normally, students must complete at least 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) including:

    • Two of the following (1.0 FCE):

      • BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution (0.5 FCE);

      • BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers (0.5 FCE); or

      • BME1479H Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers (0.5 FCE).

  • Students are also expected to pursue a thesis topic relevant to at least one of the following Biomedical Engineering research fields: 1) Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; 2) Engineering in a Clinical Setting; 3) Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging and Systems Biology; and 4) Neural/Sensory Systems and Rehabilitation.

  • Within 12 months of registration, students must pass a qualifying examination covering the broad field of biomedical engineering appropriate to their background.

  • Successful completion of a thesis, representing an original investigation in biomedical engineering.

  • Students will continue to meet with their supervisory committee at least once every 12 months until recommendation for the departmental oral examination is made. On the recommendation of the supervisory committee and special approval from their department Graduate Chair or Coordinator, candidates have the opportunity to waive the departmental oral examination and proceed directly to the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Students must participate in:

    • Either BME1010H or BME1011H Graduate Seminar series (0.0 FCE);

    • JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE);

    • Health and safety training workshops.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Transfer)

Transfer Requirements

  • Highly qualified master’s students (MHSc students in Clinical Engineering or MASc students in any field) may be considered for transfer into the PhD program in any of the five fields. MAsc and MHsc students who transfer to a PhD must fulfil the admission requirements listed under the specific field of the PhD program they are transferring to.

Program Requirements for MASc Transfer Students

  • Coursework. Students who transfer from the MASc program in Biomedical Engineering must complete the total course requirements for both degrees: 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) at the master’s level plus 1.0 FCE at the PhD level, for a total of 3.0 FCEs.

    • Students must complete two of the following (1.0 FCE):

      • BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution (0.5 FCE);

      • BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers (0.5 FCE); or

      • BME1479H Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers (0.5 FCE).

    • Elective courses relevant to the student's area of research (2.0 FCEs).

Program Requirements for MHSc Transfer Students

  • Coursework. Students who transfer from the MHSc program in Biomedical Engineering must complete the total course requirements for both degrees: 4.0 FCEs at the master's level plus 1.0 FCE at the PhD level, for a total of 5.0 FCEs.

    • BME1405H Clinical Engineering Instrumentation I (0.5 FCE) and BME1436H Clinical Engineering Surgery (0.5 FCE).

    • Students must complete two of the following (1.0 FCE):

      • BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution (0.5 FCE);

      • BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers (0.5 FCE); or

      • BME1479H Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers (0.5 FCE);

    • Two half-course electives relevant to the student's area of research (1.0 FCE).

    • BME4444Y Practical Experience Course (1.0 FCE) in health-care facilities, the medical device industry, or health-care consulting firms. The practical experience course must total a minimum of 625 hours.

All PhD Students

  • Students are expected to pursue a thesis topic relevant to at least one of the following Biomedical Engineering research fields: 1) Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; 2) Engineering in a Clinical Setting; 3) Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging and Systems Biology; and 4) Neural/Sensory Systems and Rehabilitation.

  • Within 12 months of registration, students must pass a qualifying examination covering the broad field of biomedical engineering appropriate to their background.

  • Successful completion of a thesis, representing an original investigation in biomedical engineering.

  • Students will continue to meet with their supervisory committee at least once every 12 months until recommendation for the departmental oral examination is made. On the recommendation of the supervisory committee and special approval from their department Graduate Chair or Coordinator, candidates have the opportunity to waive the departmental oral examination and proceed directly to the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Students must participate in:

    • Either BME1010H or BME1011H Graduate Seminar series (0.0 FCE);

    • JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE);

    • Health and safety training workshops.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the institute’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Direct entry with a bachelor's degree may be considered in exceptional cases. Applicants must have an undergraduate degree in dentistry, engineering, medicine, or one of the physical or biological sciences.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Normally, students must complete 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • Two of the following (1.0 FCE):

      • BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution (0.5 FCE);

      • BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers (0.5 FCE); or

      • BME1479H Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers (0.5 FCE).

    • Elective courses relevant to the student's area of research (2.0 FCEs).

  • Students are also expected to pursue a thesis topic relevant to at least one of the following Biomedical Engineering research fields: 1) Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine; 2) Engineering in a Clinical Setting; 3) Nanotechnology, Molecular Imaging and Systems Biology; and 4) Neural/Sensory Systems and Rehabilitation.

  • Successful completion of a thesis, representing an original investigation in biomedical engineering.

  • Students will continue to meet with their supervisory committee at least once every 12 months until recommendation for the departmental oral examination is made. On the recommendation of the supervisory committee and special approval from their department Graduate Chair or Coordinator, candidates have the opportunity to waive the departmental oral examination and proceed directly to the Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

  • Students must participate in:

    • Either BME1010H or BME1011H Graduate Seminar series (0.0 FCE);

    • JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE);

    • Health and safety training workshops.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Transfer)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering: Clinical Engineering MHSc

Effective January 1, 2021, admissions have been administratively suspended.

Master of Health Science

Program Description

The MHSc program educates students on how to apply and implement medical technologies to optimize modern health-care delivery. This professional degree program consists of academic courses and a research thesis and provides students with real-world exposure through a practical experience course with a private sector company, a hospital, or a research facility.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the institute’s additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Selected students with a four-year bachelor's degree in engineering, medicine, dentistry, or one of the physical or biological sciences from a recognized university, with a mid-B (3.0 grade point average [GPA]) or higher in the final two years of study or over senior-level courses.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must normally complete 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • BME1405H Clinical Engineering Instrumentation I (0.5 FCE) and BME1436H Clinical Engineering Surgery (0.5 FCE)

    • Two of the following (1.0 FCE):

      • BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution (0.5 FCE);

      • BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers (0.5 FCE); or

      • BME1479H Statistical Discovery Techniques for Biomedical Researchers (0.5 FCE)

    • Two half-course electives relevant to the student's area of research (1.0 FCE).

    • BME4444Y Practical Experience Course (1.0 FCE) in health-care facilities, the medical device industry, or health-care consulting firms. The practical experience course must total a minimum of 625 hours.

  • Students must participate in:

    • Either BME1010H or BME1011H Graduate Seminar series (0.0 FCE) and

    • JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE).

  • Successful completion of a thesis.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis plus internship



Master of Health Science
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Engineering: Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Students should contact the BME office for details.

Course Code Course Title
BME1010H
Graduate Seminar
BME1011H
Graduate Seminar
BME1405H
Clinical Engineering Instrumentation I
BME1436H
Clinical Engineering Surgery
BME1439H
Clinical Engineering Instrumentation II
BME1453H
Genomics and Synthetic Nucleic-Acid Technologies
BME1454H
Regenerative Medicine: Fundamentals and Applications
BME1459H
Protein Engineering
BME1460H
Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy: Theory and Application to Live Cell Imaging
BME1477H
Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution
BME1478H Coding for Biomedical Engineers
BME1480H
Experimental Design and Multivariate Analysis in Bioengineering
BME4444Y
Practice in Clinical Engineering
CHE1107H
Applied Mathematics
CHE1141H
Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering
CHE1143H
Transport Phenomena
CHE1310H
Chemical Properties of Polymers
DEN1070H
Advances in Dental Materials Science
DEN1081H
Bone Interfacing Implants
ECE1228H
Electromagnetic Theory
ECE1352H
Analog Circuit Design I
ECE1475H
Bio Photonics
ECE1502H
Information Theory
ECE1511H
Signal Processing
ECE1521H
Detection and Estimation Theory
ECE1647H
Introduction to Nonlinear Control Systems
JCB1349H
Molecular Assemblies: Structure/Function/Properties
JEB1433H
Medical Imaging
JEB1444H
Neural Engineering
JEB1447H
Sensory Communications
JMB1050H
Biological and Bio-inspired Materials
JNP1017H+
Current Topics in Molecular and Biochemical Toxicology
JNP1018H+
Molecular and Biochemical Basis of Toxicology
JNR1444Y
Fundamentals of Neuroscience: Cellular and Molecular — Lectures
JNS1000Y
Fundamentals of Neuroscience: Systems and Behaviour
JPB1022H
Human Physiology as Related to Engineering II
JPB1055H
Bioengineering for Life Scientists
JTC1135H
Applied Surface Chemistry
JTC1331H
Biomaterials Science
MIE1001H
Advanced Dynamics
MIE1052H Signal Processing for Bioengineering
MIE1101H
Advanced Classical Thermodynamics
MIE1201H
Advanced Fluid Mechanics I
MSE1026H
Analytical Electron Microscopy
PHM1109H
Recent Developments in Dosage Form Design
PSL1432H
Theoretical Physiology
PSL1452H
Fundamentals of Ion Channel Function
REH1100H
Theory and Research in Rehabilitation Science

+ Extended course. For academic reasons, coursework is extended into session following academic session in which course is offered.

Biomedical Engineering (Collaborative Specialization)
Biomedical Engineering: Doctoral Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants who wish to enrol in the collaborative specialization must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and a graduate degree program in one of the collaborating graduate units.

  • Applicants must be graduates in dentistry, engineering, engineering science, medicine, or one of the physical or biological sciences and must be accepted to the Collaborative Specialization in Biomedical Engineering through one of the collaborating graduate units (home graduate units) listed above.

  • Before PhD students are accepted, the collaborative specialization committee must be satisfied with the applicant's ability to undertake advanced graduate studies.

Specialization Requirements

  • A qualifying examination may be required by the collaborating unit.

  • Students admitted to the collaborative specialization who are admitted to a PhD program in their home unit will be subject to the requirements of the collaborating unit. The plan of study for each PhD student registered in the Collaborative Specialization in Biomedical Engineering must be approved by the collaborating unit and the collaborative specialization committee; the plan of study will normally comprise at least 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) and a thesis.

    • Engineering and physical science students will be required to take a biological sciences course such as JPB1022H Human Physiology as Related to Biomedical Engineering (or an equivalent).

    • Biological science students will be expected to take a physical sciences course such as JPB1055H Bioengineering for Life Scientists (or an equivalent).

    • Students will be expected to take BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution and pursue a thesis topic relevant to biomedical engineering.

  • In addition to the 1.0 FCE, students are required to participate in two seminar courses: one of BME1010H or BME1011H Graduate Seminar series (0.0 FCE), and JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE).

  • Each PhD student is normally required to have a supervisory committee consisting of at least three persons, including a supervisor who has an appropriate graduate appointment and who is also a member of the graduate faculty in the home unit. When appropriate, an additional member of the supervisory committee may be from outside the University of Toronto, with approval from the School of Graduate Studies.

  • For doctoral degrees, the examination committee will be constituted according to procedures in the home graduate unit and will include a member from that collaborating unit.

Biomedical Engineering (Collaborative Specialization)
Biomedical Engineering: Master's Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants who wish to enrol in the collaborative specialization must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and a graduate degree program in one of the collaborating graduate units.

  • Applicants must be graduates in dentistry, engineering, engineering science, medicine, or one of the physical or biological sciences and must be accepted to the Collaborative Specialization in Biomedical Engineering through one of the collaborating graduate units (home graduate units) listed above.

Specialization Requirements

Students register in the School of Graduate Studies through their home graduate unit; they will meet all respective degree requirements as described by SGS and the collaborative specialization committee. As part of these requirements:

  • The program of study for each MASc or MSc degree student registered in the collaborative specialization must meet the requirements of the collaborating unit and will normally comprise at least 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) and a thesis in the biomedical field.

    • Engineering and physical science students will be required to take a biological sciences course such as JPB1022H Human Physiology as Related to Biomedical Engineering (or an equivalent).

    • Biological science students will be expected to take a physical sciences course such as JPB1055H Bioengineering for Life Scientists (or an equivalent).

    • Students will be expected to take BME1477H Biomedical Engineering Project Design and Execution and pursue a thesis topic relevant to biomedical engineering.

  • In addition to the 2.0 FCEs, students registered in a graduate degree program involving research are required to participate in two seminar courses: one of BME1010H or BME1011H Graduate Seminar Series (0.0 FCE) and JDE1000H Ethics in Research (0.0 FCE).

  • Students are required to have a supervisory committee approved by the collaborative specialization committee and consisting of a supervisor from IBME, with a cross-appointment in the home unit, and other members from other collaborating units as required.

  • The examination committee will be constituted according to procedures in the home graduate unit and will include a member from that collaborating unit.

Biomedical Engineering (Collaborative Specialization)
Book History and Print Culture: Courses
Course Code Course Title
BKS1001H
Introduction to Book History
BKS1002H
Book History in Practice
BKS2000H
Advanced Seminar in Book History and Print Culture
BKS2001H
Individual Practicum in Book History and Print Culture

Get further details and listings of appropriate courses in various graduate units.

Book History and Print Culture (Collaborative Specialization)
Book History and Print Culture: Doctoral Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants who wish to enrol in the collaborative specialization must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and one of the participating degree programs (home unit). Applicants to the collaborative specialization write to the director giving information about their background and relevant interests, identifying the degree and home unit for which they are applying, and outlining a proposed plan of study by April 10 for September admission. Applicants need not wait for a final decision from the home unit before applying to the collaborative specialization. Academic transcript(s) should be included in the application; unofficial transcripts are acceptable and may be sent either as scans attached to your email or as printouts from a student web service mailed to the BHPC office. Advice is available from the director and the collaborative specialization committee.

  • Applications from the participating units have priority in admissions. If there is space in the collaborative specialization, students from other units may apply; they should consult the graduate coordinator in their home unit and the director of the BHPC specialization. Since course requirements vary from unit to unit, it is essential that there be close consultation between the collaborative specialization and the home unit at the time of the application.

Specialization Requirements

  • Students must fulfil the degree requirements of the unit in which they are enrolled.

  • The plan of study must also be approved by the BHPC specialization committee. The plan of study includes BKS1001H Introduction to Book History (if that course has not been taken previously at the master's level), BKS2000H Advanced Seminar in Book History and Print Culture, and BKS2001H Individual Practicum in Book History and Print Culture. BKS1001H must be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite to BKS2000H and BKS2001H.

  • The dissertation topic will be in the area of book history and print culture. The advisory committee will include at least one faculty member affiliated with BHPC, and students are encouraged, but not required, to seek representation on the committee from outside the home unit.

  • The collaborative specialization may be completed on a flexible-time basis only by Faculty of Information students registered for the Information flexible-time PhD.

Book History and Print Culture (Collaborative Specialization)
Book History and Print Culture: Master's Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants who wish to enrol in the collaborative specialization must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and one of the participating degree programs (home unit). Applicants to the collaborative specialization write to the director giving information about their background and relevant interests, identifying the degree and home unit for which they are applying, and outlining a proposed plan of study by April 10 for September admission. Applicants need not wait for a final decision from the home unit before applying to the collaborative specialization. Academic transcript(s) should be included in the application; unofficial transcripts are acceptable and may be sent either as scans attached to your email or as printouts from a student web service mailed to the BHPC office. Advice is available from the director and the collaborative specialization committee.

  • Applications from the participating units have priority in admissions. If there is space in the collaborative specialization, students from other units may apply; they should consult the graduate coordinator in their home unit and the director of the BHPC specialization. Since course requirements vary from unit to unit, it is essential that there be close consultation between the collaborative specialization and the home unit at the time of the application.

 

Specialization Requirements

MA in Art History; MA in Classics; MA in East Asian Studies (Thesis Option); MA in English (Creative Writing Field); MA in French Language and Literature; MA in Germanic Languages and Literatures; MA in History; MA in History and Philosophy of Science and Technology; Master of Information (Thesis Option); MA in Medieval Studies (Thesis Option); Master of Museum Studies; MA in Religion

  • Students must fulfil the degree requirements of the unit in which they are enrolled.

  • BKS1001H Introduction to Book History (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]) and BKS1002H Book History in Practice (0.5 FCE), both of which should be taken in Year 1.

  • The thesis or capstone project (MSL4000Y [1.0 FCE; Credit/No Credit]) in the participating degree program will be on a topic related to book history and print culture, approved by the collaborative specialization committee.

  • Collaborative specialization courses may be taken as electives for the purpose of satisfying home program requirements.

 

Specialization Requirements

MA in Comparative Literature; MA in East Asian Studies (Coursework-Only Option); MA in English; MA in Italian Studies; MA in Medieval Studies (Coursework-Only Option); MA in Spanish

  • Students must fulfil the degree requirements of the unit in which they are enrolled.

  • BKS1001H Introduction to Book History (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]) and BKS1002H Book History in Practice (0.5 FCE), both of which should be taken in Year 1.

  • At least 0.5 FCE in additional elective courses related to book history and print culture.

  • Collaborative specialization courses may be taken as electives for the purpose of satisfying home program requirements.

 

Specialization Requirements

Master of Information (Coursework-Only Option)

  • Students must fulfil the degree requirements of the unit in which they are enrolled.

  • BKS1001H Introduction to Book History (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]) and BKS1002H Book History in Practice (0.5 FCE), both of which should be taken in Year 1.

  • At least 1.5 FCEs in additional elective courses related to book history and print culture.

  • Collaborative specialization courses may be taken as electives for the purpose of satisfying home program requirements.

 

Specialization Requirements

MA in Music

  • Students must fulfil the degree requirements of the unit in which they are enrolled.

  • BKS1001H Introduction to Book History (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]) and BKS1002H Book History in Practice (0.5 FCE), both of which should be taken in Year 1.

  • At least 1.0 FCE in additional elective courses related to book history and print culture.

  • Collaborative specialization courses may be taken as electives for the purpose of satisfying home program requirements.

 

Elective courses will come from the BHPC roster of cross-listed courses, though students may substitute other courses with the director's approval. Students are encouraged to take courses outside their home graduate unit, if possible.

Book History and Print Culture (Collaborative Specialization)
Cardiovascular Sciences: Courses

Cardiovascular sciences courses offered by the participating units are listed below. Not all courses are offered each year. For course details, consult the Cardiovascular Sciences website.

Course Code Course Title
JCV1060H
Developmental Cardiovascular Physiology
JCV3060H
Advanced Topics in Cardiovascular Sciences — Molecular Biology and Heart Signal Transduction
JCV3061H
Advanced Topics in Cardiovascular Sciences — Hormones and the Cardiovascular System
JCV3062H
Advanced Topics in Cardiovascular Sciences — Heart Function
JCV3063H
Advanced Topics in Cardiovascular Sciences — Vascular
JCV3064H
Advanced Topics in Cardiovascular Sciences — Microvascular Medicine
JCV3065H
Advanced Topics in Cardiovascular Sciences — Systems Biology
JTC1331H
Biomaterials Science
KIN5508H Cardiovascular Disease and Exercise
LMP1104H (0.25 FCE) Current Understanding of Ischemic Heart Disease
LMP1105H (0.25 FCE) Current Understanding of Atherosclerosis
PSL1462H
Molecular Aspects of Cardiac Function
Cardiovascular Sciences (Collaborative Specialization)
Cardiovascular Sciences: Doctoral Level

Admission Requirements

  • Normally, an A– average in previous coursework (publications and research work may be considered for mature students).

  • The student has already been accepted into a home graduate unit that participates in the Cardiovascular Sciences Collaborative Specialization.

  • Acceptance by a supervisor who is a faculty member of the Cardiovascular Sciences Collaborative Specialization.

  • Research area falls within the mandate of the Cardiovascular Sciences Collaborative Specialization.

Specialization Requirements

  • Students must meet the requirements of their home graduate unit in terms of coursework and thesis work.

  • Write a thesis under the supervision of a faculty member of the collaborative specialization. The thesis topic will be in the area of cardiovascular sciences. An electronic copy of the accepted thesis in final form must be submitted to the Cardiovascular Sciences Collaborative Specialization.

  • Complete two half courses or 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) chosen from among the following seven courses: JCV1060H, JCV3060H, JCV3061H, JCV3062H, JCV3063H, JCV3064H, and JCV3065H.

  • Students must attend the annual Student Research Day each year they are in this collaborative specialization, and make one presentation during training. The presentation must demonstrate excellence in cardiovascular research.

Cardiovascular Sciences (Collaborative Specialization)
Cardiovascular Sciences: Master's Level

Admission Requirements

  • Normally, an A– average in previous coursework (publications and research work may be considered for mature students).

  • The student has already been accepted into a home graduate unit that participates in the Cardiovascular Sciences Collaborative Specialization.

  • Acceptance by a supervisor who is a faculty member of the Cardiovascular Sciences Collaborative Specialization.

  • Research area falls within the mandate of the Cardiovascular Sciences Collaborative Specialization.

Specialization Requirements

  • Students must meet the requirements of their home graduate unit in terms of coursework and thesis work.

  • Write a thesis under the supervision of a faculty member of the collaborative specialization. The thesis topic will be in the area of cardiovascular sciences. An electronic copy of the accepted thesis in final form must be submitted to the Cardiovascular Sciences Collaborative Specialization.

  • Complete 0.5 full-course equivalent (FCE) in an approved cardiovascular course listed under the approved Course List.

  • Students must attend the annual Student Research Day each year they are in this collaborative specialization, and make one presentation during training. The presentation must demonstrate excellence in cardiovascular research.

Cardiovascular Sciences (Collaborative Specialization)
Cell and Systems Biology: Cell and Systems Biology MSc

Master of Science

Program Description

The MSc program in Cell and Systems Biology provides ideal training for career paths in education, business, and policy where science-based decision-making and the interpretation and transmission of scientific information are becoming increasingly important, particularly in many of the “knowledge-based” economies that are emerging the world over.

The MSc program trains scientists who are well suited to fill this demand. The program’s objective is to provide students with skills in the generation, critical evaluation, assessment, and communication of data so that they are equipped to proceed with further post-graduate degrees, or other career opportunities where such skills are desired.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Cell and Systems Biology's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized university, with a B+ (or equivalent) average in the final year of the bachelor's program, and a mid-B overall average in the previous year of study.

Program Requirements

  • Complete 0.5 full-course equivalent (FCE) of approved graduate coursework.

  • Complete the CSB1010Y MSc Seminar Series (1.0 FCE, minimum 24 seminars per year).

  • Complete a thesis based on a research project.

  • Give a public presentation of thesis research and defend the thesis at an oral examination.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis



Master of Science
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time


 

Cell and Systems Biology
Cell and Systems Biology: Cell and Systems Biology MSc, PhD Courses

Consult the graduate unit regarding course availability.

Course Code Course Title
CSB1010Y0
MSc Seminar Series
CSB1011Y0
PhD Seminar Series
CSB1018H
Advanced Microscopy and Imaging
CSB1020H
Topics in Cell and Systems Biology
CSB1025H
Methods in Genomics and Proteomics
CSB1472H
Computational Genomics and Bioinformatics
CSB1482H
Readings in Genome Biology and Bioinformatics

0 Course that continues over a program. The course is graded when completed.

Cell and Systems Biology
Cell and Systems Biology: Cell and Systems Biology PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The PhD program in Cell and Systems Biology trains scientists who will form part of the next generation of independent researchers in cell, molecular, and systems biology. Graduates will be the future high-level teachers, frontier expanders, and decision-makers in these fields of inquiry.

PhD graduates are expected to emerge from the program as independent and autonomous scientists, producing a written thesis that describes original research that stands as a testimony to their ability to generate publishable, stand-alone contributions to the peer-reviewed scientific literature. As part of their training, PhD students acquire skills in the communication of scientific research (including teaching skills), and acquire broad-based knowledge of the theory and practice underpinning their chosen field.

Applicants may enter the PhD program via one of three routes: 1) following completion of an MSc degree; 2) transfer from the University of Toronto MSc program; or 3) direct entry following completion of an honours bachelor’s degree.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Cell and Systems Biology's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Students will be admitted only when they have made arrangements to secure a research supervisor by contacting professors in the department.

  • Applicants may be accepted who already hold an MSc degree from a recognized university, with a grade average equivalent to at least a University of Toronto A– during the MSc.

Program Requirements

  • Students must successfully complete:

    • 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) of approved graduate coursework.

    • CSB1011Y PhD Seminar Series (1.0 FCE, minimum 24 seminars per year).

    • A PhD proposal, which involves three components:

      • preparation of a written research proposal

      • presentation to the department and questioning by the public

      • in-camera questioning by a PhD proposal examination committee immediately following the public presentation.

    • Their proposal examination between 13 and 20 months after the start date of enrolment in their graduate program.

  • Students must submit a thesis and defend it at a Doctoral Final Oral Examination conducted by the School of Graduate Studies.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Transfer)

Transfer Requirements

  • Applicants may be accepted first into the University of Toronto MSc program and, conditional upon approval by the thesis supervisory committee, may transfer into the PhD program.

Program Requirements

Students must:

  • Be in good academic standing at the end of Year 1.

  • Successfully complete 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) of approved graduate coursework. Those who transfer into the PhD program from the MSc may apply 0.5 graduate FCE towards the PhD course requirements.

  • Successfully complete CSB1011Y PhD Seminar Series (1.0 FCE, minimum 24 seminars per year).

  • Successfully complete a PhD transfer examination between 13 and 20 months after the start date of enrolment in their graduate program. The transfer examination involves three components:

    • preparation of a written research proposal

    • presentation to the department and questioning by the public

    • in-camera questioning by a PhD proposal examination committee immediately following the public presentation.

  • Deliver two public seminars in the department based on their thesis research.

  • Submit a thesis and defend it at a Doctoral Final Oral Examination conducted by the School of Graduate Studies.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Cell and Systems Biology's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants will be admitted only when they have made arrangements to secure a research supervisor by contacting professors in the department.

  • Exceptional applicants with a BSc degree may be accepted by direct entry into the PhD program, with a grade point average equivalent to a University of Toronto A– or better in the final year of the BSc. Direct-entry PhD candidates should also display evidence of research potential.

Program Requirements

Students must:

  • Be in good academic standing at the end of Year 1.

  • Successfully complete 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) of approved graduate coursework.

  • Successfully complete CSB1011Y PhD Seminar Series (1.0 FCE, minimum 24 seminars per year).

  • Complete additional courses if their undergraduate preparation does not include the study of subjects deemed to be necessary for research in the chosen area. The courses will be chosen in consultation with the supervisory committee.

  • Successfully complete a PhD proposal, which involves three components:

    • preparation of a written research proposal

    • presentation to the department and questioning by the public

    • in-camera questioning by a PhD proposal examination committee immediately following the public presentation.

  • Students must successfully complete their proposal examination between 13 and 20 months after the start date of enrolment in their graduate program.

  • Deliver two public seminars in the department based on their thesis research.

  • Submit a thesis and defend it at a Doctoral Final Oral Examination conducted by the School of Graduate Studies.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Transfer)
Program Length: 5 years 
Time Limit: 7 years 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years 
Time Limit: 7 years
 

Cell and Systems Biology
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc

Master of Applied Science

Program Description

The MASc program is ideal for students who aspire to a rewarding career in research, whether in academia or industry. It is a stepping stone to a doctoral (PhD) degree.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A four-year degree (or equivalent) in engineering or the physical/chemical/biological sciences with a B+ average (or equivalent) in each of the last two years of full-time study.

Program Requirements

  • Each student should discuss possible research projects with several members of the department before selecting a research area and a supervisor. Students must complete a thesis on a research topic.

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 1.5 full-course equivalents [FCEs] (three graduate half courses) as follows:

    • One of these courses must be CHE1102H Research Methods and Project Execution (0.5 FCE), typically completed in Year 1.

    • At least one course must be selected in an area outside the student's area of research.

    • Only one 500-level course may be taken for credit towards the degree program.

  • All Year 1 and Year 2 students must complete CHE3001H0 Leading Edge Seminar Series in Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (Credit/No Credit; 0.0 FCE) in both the Fall and Winter sessions.

  • Students must also complete CHE2222H Safety Workshop (0.0 FCE) and JDE1000H Ethics in Research.

  • The program requires a minimum full-time residence of two sessions (eight months). This means students must be on campus full-time and consequently in geographical proximity to be able to participate fully in the University activities associated with the program.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

Coursework plus thesis



Master of Applied Science
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time


 

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc, MEng, PhD Courses

An updated course list and schedule is available on the departmental website at the beginning of each session listing the time and room location for each course. Not all courses are given every year.

All students wishing to undertake research and teaching in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry must successfully complete an intensive occupational health and safety training workshop, CHE2222H Safety Workshop, which normally takes place during the week immediately preceding the commencement of graduate courses in the Fall. In each subsequent year of registration, students must take the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System refresher workshop. Students registered in a graduate degree program involving research are required to participate in the non-credit seminar course JDE1000H Ethics in Research during their first or second session of registration.

Category A: Fundamental Courses

Course Code Course Title
CHE1100H
Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering
CHE1107H
Applied Mathematics
CHE1141H
Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering
CHE1142H
Applied Chemical Thermodynamics
CHE1143H
Transport Phenomena
CHE1310H
Chemical Properties of Polymers
JTC1134H
Applied Surface and Interface Science
JTC1135H
Applied Surface Chemistry

Category B: Specialized Courses

Course Code Course Title
APS502H
Financial Engineering
APS510H
Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems
APS530H
Appropriate Technology and Design for Global Development
APS1001H
Project Management
APS1004H
Human Resource Management: An Engineering Perspective
APS1005H
Operations Research for Engineering Management
APS1009H
Natural Resources Management
APS1012H
Managing Business Innovation and Transformational Change
APS1013H
Applying Innovation in Engineering and Business Operations
APS1015H
Social Entrepreneurship
APS1016H
Financial Management for Engineers
APS1017H
Supply Chain Management and Logistics
APS1018H
The Engineer in Society — Ethics, History, and Philosophy
APS1020H
International Business for Engineers
APS1022H
Financial Engineering II
APS1023H
New Production Innovation
APS1024H
Infrastructure Resilience Planning
APS1025H
Infrastructure Protection
APS1028H
Operations and Production Management for Manufacturing and Services
APS1031H
Infrastructure Planning
APS1032H
Introduction to Energy Project Management
APS1033H
Business Innovation Leading to the Future, Based on Imagineering
APS1034H
Making Sense of Accidents
APS1035H
Technology Sales for Entrepreneurs
APS1036H
Formative Experiential Entrepreneurial Learning (FEEL)
APS1043H Writing Your Own Patent Application
APS1070H
Foundations of Data Analytics and Machine Learning
APS1088H
Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers
APS1201H
Topics in Engineering and Public Policy 500-Level (undergraduate/graduate) Courses
APS1420H
Technology, Engineering, and Global Development
APS5500H Research Methods and Project Execution for Graduate Student Success
(exclusion: CHE1102H)
CHE507H
Process Modelling and Simulation
CHE553H
Electrochemistry
CHE561H
Risk Based Safety Management
CHE564H
Pulp and Paper Processes
CHE565H
Aqueous Process Engineering
CHE568H
Nuclear Engineering
CHE575H
Mechanical Properties of Bio-Composites and Biomaterials
CHE1053H
Electrochemistry
CHE1108H
Numerical Methods in Chemical Engineering
CHE1123H
Liquid Biofuels
CHE1125H
Modelling and Optimization of Chemical and Biomedical Networks
CHE1134H
Advances in Bioengineering
CHE1135H Regulatory Affairs for Industrial Biotechnology and Biopharmaceutical Products
CHE1147H
Data Mining in Engineering
CHE1148H
Process Data Analytics
CHE1150H
Industrial Water Technology
CHE1151H
Engineering Systems Sustainability
CHE1152H Materials-Driven Separations
(prerequisites: CHE210H, CHE311H, CHE323H, or equivalent)
CHE1213H
Corrosion
CHE1333H Biomaterials Engineering for Nanomedicine
CHE1334H Organ-on-a-Chip Engineering
CHE1430H
Hydrometallurgy, Theory, and Practice (MEng only)
CHE1431H
Environmental Auditing (MEng only)
CHE1432H
Technical Aspects of Environmental Regulations (MEng only)
CHE1433H
Air Dispersion Modelling
CHE1434H
Six Sigma for Chemical Processes
CHE1435H
Fundamentals of Aerosol Physics and Chemistry
CHE1450H Bioprocess Engineering
(prerequisite: JCC1313H or equivalent)
CHE1471H Modelling in Biological and Chemical Systems
CHE1475H
Biocomposite Materials
CHE3010H PhD Research (Credit/No Credit)
JCB1349H
Molecular Assemblies: Structure/Function/Properties
JCC1313H
Environmental Microbiology
JCR1000Y
An Interdisciplinary Approach to Addressing Global Challenges
JNC2503H
Environmental Pathways
JTC1331H
Biomaterials Science
TEP1010H Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership
TEP1011H Authentic Leadership and Teaming
TEP1026H Positive Psychology for Engineers
TEP1027H Engineering Presentations
TEP1029H The Science of Emotional Intelligence and its Application to Leadership
TEP1030H Engineering Careers — Theories and Strategies to Manage Your Career for the Future
TEP1501H Leadership and Leading in Groups and Organizations
TEP1502H Leadership in Product Design

MASc and PhD Seminar Courses

Course Code Course Title
CHE1102H
Research Methods and Project Execution
CHE3001H Leading Edge Seminar Series in Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (Credit/No Credit)

In addition to the above courses, students may elect to take courses in other engineering or science departments where such courses are deemed relevant to the area of study. These courses require prior approval from the Graduate Coordinator.

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases

Emphasis: Advanced Manufacturing (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete:

  • Four half courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]), including at least one core course.

  • Elective courses may include other core courses, and courses from either of two streams: Manufacturing Engineering and Manufacturing Management.

Core Courses

AER501H Advanced Mechanics of Structures
AER1403H Advanced Aerospace Structures
APS1028H Operations and Production Management for Manufacturing and Services
CHE1123H Liquid Biofuels
MIE519H Advanced Manufacturing Technologies
MIE1740H Smart Materials and Structures.

Elective Courses — Manufacturing Engineering

AER521H, AER1415H,
CHE575H, CHE1134H, CHE1475H,
MIE506H, MIE540H, MIE1706H, MIE1713H, MIE1718H, MIE1743H,
MSE1013H, MSE1015H, MSE1028H, MSE1031H, MSE1043H, MSE1058H, MSE1061H,
ROB501H.

Elective Courses — Manufacturing Management

APS1005H, APS1012H, APS1013H, APS1017H, APS1020H, APS1023H, APS1040H, APS1088H, APS1420H,
CHE561H, CHE1434H,
MIE523H, MIE1022H, MIE1505H, MIE1514H, MIE1715H, MIE1721H, MIE1723H, MIE1727H,
TEP1011H, TEP1026H, TEP1501H.

 

Emphasis: Advanced Soft Materials (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete any four half courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) from the following list:

CHE562H, CHE1310H, CHE1333H, CHE1335H, CHE1475H,
JTC1134H, JTC1135H,
MIE1705H, MIE1706H, MIE1707H, MIE1740H,
MSE1032H.

Students may double-count one course at most towards any CHE emphasis, or towards any other emphasis in the Faculty.

 

Emphasis: Advanced Water Technologies (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete a total of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (four half courses). This includes at least one course (0.5 FCE) selected from the core course list. The remaining courses must be selected from the elective course list.

Core Courses (complete at least one)

  • CHE1150H Industrial Water Technology

  • CIV1308H Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes

  • CIV1309H Biological Treatment Processes

  • CIV1311H Advanced and Sustainable Drinking Water Treatment

Elective courses (complete remaining courses)

  • CHE565H Aqueous Process Engineering

  • CHE1213H Corrosion

  • CHE1430H Hydrometallurgy Theory and Practice

  • CIV541H Environmental Biotechnology

  • CIV549H Groundwater Flow and Contamination

  • CIV550H Water Resources Engineering

  • CIV1303H Water Resources Systems Modeling

  • CIV1319H Chemistry and Analysis of Water and Wastes

  • CIV1330H Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Global Health

  • CIV1399H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering (for example, Water Sanitation and Hygiene; Treatment Wetlands; the topic is subject to obtaining approval from the student's graduate unit)

  • CIV1499H Special Studies in Civil Engineering

  • JCC1313H Environmental Microbiology

  • JNC2503H Environmental Pathways

  • MIE1807H Principles of Measurements

  • STA1004H Introduction to Experimental Design.

Enrolment Contact

Enrolment in the emphasis is permitted at any time during the MEng program. After students are admitted to the normal MEng program, students may contact Prof. Ron Hofmann, (416) 946-7508.

Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and the successful completion of the MEng degree requirements, students will receive a transcript notation from the Faculty Graduate Studies office (subject to Prof. Hofmann’s recommendation).

 

Emphasis: Analytics (MEng only)

To be admitted to the emphasis in Analytics, MEng students must first successfully complete a prerequisite course APS1070H (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]).

Subsequently, to earn the emphasis, students must successfully complete four additional half courses (2.0 FCEs) from the list of core courses or elective courses. These must include at least one core course; the remaining courses must be selected from the list of elective courses.

Students must have completed the prerequisite course APS1070H before taking any of the core courses.

Prerequisite Course

APS1070H Foundations of Data Analytics and Machine Learning.

Core Courses

CHE1147H Data Mining in Engineering
ECE1513H Introduction to Machine Learning (exclusions: CSC411H, CSC2515H, ECE421H, ECE1504H)
MIE1624H Introduction to Data Science and Analytics (exclusion: MIE1626H)
MIE1626H Data Science Methods and Quantitative Analysis (exclusion: MIE 1624H)
MSE1065H Application of Artificial Intelligence in Materials Design (exclusion: MSE1063H).

Elective Courses

APS502H, APS1005H, APS1017H, APS1022H, APS1040H, APS1050H, APS1051H, APS1052H, APS1053H, APS1080H,
CEM1002H,
CHE507H, CHE1108H, CHE1148H, CHE1434H,
CIV1504H, CIV1506H, CIV1507H, CIV1532H, CIV1538H,
ECE537H, ECE1504H (exclusions: CSC411H, CSC2515H, ECE421H, ECE521H, ECE1513H), ECE1505H, ECE1510H, ECE1657H, ECE1778H, ECE1779H,
MIE562H, MIE1077H, MIE1413H, MIE1501H, MIE1512H, MIE1513H, MIE1517H, MIE1620H, MIE1621H, MIE1622H, MIE1623H, MIE1625H, MIE1628H, MIE1653H, MIE1666H, MIE1721H, MIE1723H, MIE1727H, MIE1769H,
MSE1063H (exclusion: MSE1065H).

 

Emphasis: Biomanufacturing (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete any four half courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) from the following list:

CHE1123H, CHE1125H, CHE1134H, CHE1135H, CHE1334H, CHE1450H, CHE1471H,
JCC1313H,
JTC1331H,
BME1459H, BME1480H.

Students may double-count one course at most towards any CHE emphasis, or towards any other emphasis in the Faculty.

 

Emphasis: Engineering and Globalization (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete four half courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) from the following lists, with at least two half courses (or one full course) taken from Group A.

Group A

APS510H, APS530H, APS1420H, JCR1000Y (full-year course).

Group B

APS1015H, APS1020H, APS1024H, CHL5700H, CIV1399H, JMG2020H.

Note: Students who choose to pursue an MEng project in their home department that aligns with the Centre for Global Engineering (CGEN)'s disciplinary focus, as deemed by the CGEN Director, may count the project as one required Group B course.

Students who complete the requirements of the emphasis in Engineering and Globalization and wish to obtain a notation on their transcript should contact the Faculty Graduate Studies office.

 

Emphasis: Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE) (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete any four of the following courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]):

Leadership

TEP1010H, TEP1011H, TEP1026H, TEP1027H, TEP1029H, TEP1030H, TEP1501H, TEP1502H, TEP1601H.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

APS1012H, APS1013H, APS1015H, APS1023H, APS1033H, APS1035H, APS1036H, APS1041H, APS1061H, APS1088H.

Finance and Management

AER1601H, APS502H, APS1001H, APS1004H, APS1005H, APS1009H, APS1016H, APS1017H, APS1020H, APS1022H, APS1028H, APS1032H, APS1038H, APS1039H, APS1040H, APS1043H, APS1049H, APS1050H, APS1051H, APS1052H.

Engineering and Society

APS510H, APS1018H, APS1024H, APS1025H, APS1031H, APS1034H, APS1101H, APS1420H.

 

Emphasis: Forensic Engineering (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete four courses (one core course and three elective courses).

Core Course

MSE1031H Forensic Engineering.

Elective Courses

AER1604H,
APS1034H, APS1039H, APS1040H, APS1101H,
BME1480H, BME1800H, BME1801H, BME1802H,
CHE561H, CHE568H, CHE1213H, CHE1431H, CHE1432H, CHE1434H, CHE1436H,
CIV510H, CIV518H, CIV1163H, CIV1171H, CIV1174H, CIV1190H, CIV1201H, CIV1279H, CIV1282H, CIV1422H, CIV1429H,
JMB1050H,
JNC2503H,
MIE507H, MIE533H, MIE566H, MIE1301H, MIE1303H, MIE1411H, MIE1414H, MIE1514H, MIE1616H, MIE17108H, MIE1713H, MIE1714H, MIE1721H, MIE1723H, MIE1727H, MIE1804H,
MSE1015H, MSE1016H, MSE1022H, MSE1032H, MSE1067H.

 

Emphasis: Sustainable Energy (MASc, MEng, PhD)

MASc and PhD students must successfully complete:

  • At least three half courses (1.5 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) from either of the following lists below.

  • A thesis towards their degree on a topic related to sustainable energy. Topics must be approved by the steering committee of the Institute of Sustainable Energy. Contact: Mandeep Rayat.

MEng students must successfully complete:

  • Four half courses (2.0 FCEs) from either of the following lists below, including at least one core course (0.5 FCE).

Core Courses

APS1032H Introduction to Energy Project Management
MIE515H Alternative Energy Systems
MIE1120H Current Energy Infrastructure and Resources.

Elective Courses

AER507H, AER1304H, AER1315H, AER1415H,
CHE568H, CHE1053H, CHE1118H, CHE1123H, CHE1142H, CHE1143H,
CIV575H, CIV576H, CIV577H, CIV1303H, CIV1307H,
ECE533H, ECE1030H, ECE1055H, ECE1057H, ECE1059H, ECE1085H, ECE1086H, ECE1092H, ECE1094H, ECE1476H,
MIE516H, MIE517H, MIE1128H, MIE1129H, MIE1130H, MIE1240H, MIE1241H, MIE1715H,
MSE1023H, MSE1028H, MSE1058H.

Students who complete the requirements of the emphasis in Sustainable Energy will receive a notation on their transcript from the Faculty Graduate Studies Office following a recommendation from the Institute of Sustainable Energy. Contact: Mandeep Rayat.

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MEng

Master of Engineering

Program Description

The MEng program is designed for engineers who wish to enhance their career opportunities in as little as one year of full-time study. Students undergo advanced professional training that is respected by employers and differentiates them in a crowded marketplace. The MEng program differs from the MASc and PhD programs in that it is oriented to learning through prescribed courses rather than through research.

The MEng program can be taken on a full-time, extended full-time, or part-time basis. The part-time option is intended primarily for engineers in full-time professional practice.

 

Full-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A Bachelor of Engineering (BEng) or Bachelor of Applied Science (BASc) degree in engineering with at least a mid-B (or equivalent) in each of the last two years of full-time study.

Program Requirements

  • The MEng program normally requires completion of:

    • a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) or

    • 3.5 FCEs plus a 1.5-FCE project supervised by a faculty member. At the discretion of the supervisor, a second reviewer and/or oral defence may be requested for students who plan to enter the doctoral program.

  • Students normally complete the requirements in three sessions (one year).

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Advanced Manufacturing; Advanced Soft Materials; Advanced Water Technologies; Analytics; Biomanufacturing; Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE); Forensic Engineering; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

3 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years

 

Extended Full-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A Bachelor of Engineering (BEng) or Bachelor of Applied Science (BASc) degree in engineering with at least a mid-B (or equivalent) in each of the last two years of full-time study.

Program Requirements

  • The MEng program normally requires completion of:

    • a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) or

    • 3.5 FCEs plus a 1.5-FCE project supervised by a faculty member. At the discretion of the supervisor, a second reviewer and/or oral defence may be requested for students who plan to enter the doctoral program.

  • Students are expected to complete the requirements in six sessions (two years). They are limited to six half courses per year and three half courses per session.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Advanced Manufacturing; Advanced Soft Materials; Advanced Water Technologies; Analytics; Biomanufacturing; Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE); Forensic Engineering; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

6 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)**

Time Limit

3 years

** Students may begin the program at different times.

 

Part-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A Bachelor of Engineering (BEng) or Bachelor of Applied Science (BASc) degree in engineering with at least a mid-B (or equivalent) in each of the last two years of full-time study.

Program Requirements

  • The MEng program normally requires completion of:

    • a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) or

    • 3.5 FCEs plus a 1.5-FCE project supervised by a faculty member. At the discretion of the supervisor, a second reviewer and/or oral defence may be requested for students who plan to enter the doctoral program.

  • Students normally complete the requirements in nine sessions (three years). They are limited to four half courses per year and two half courses per session.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Advanced Manufacturing; Advanced Soft Materials; Advanced Water Technologies; Analytics; Biomanufacturing; Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE); Forensic Engineering; or Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

9 sessions

Time Limit

6 years

1. Coursework-only or 2. Coursework plus project



Master of Engineering

Full-Time Option
Program Length: 3 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years

Extended Full-Time Option
Program Length: 6 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)**
Time Limit: 3 years

Part-Time Option
Program Length: 9 sessions
Time Limit: 6 years part-time

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry: Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The PhD program is designed for students who wish to become an expert in a specific research area and is a stepping stone to a career in academia. Students work alongside world-renowned researchers while gaining profound depth and experience in their field of study.

Applicants may enter the program via one of three routes: 1) following completion of an MASc degree; 2) transfer from the University of Toronto MASc program after completing one year; or 3) direct entry following completion of a bachelor's degree, in exceptional cases. The program can also be taken on a flexible-time basis.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • B+ (or equivalent) in each of the last two years of full-time study in the undergraduate program, and successful completion of a research master's degree with an overall average of at least B+ (or equivalent).

  • Applicants may enter the PhD program following completion of an MASc program with a minimum B+ average and exceptional all-around scientific and intellectual ability as evidenced from theoretical or experimental research, academic standing, initiative, and publication record.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete at least 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (four graduate half courses).

    • One course must be CHE1102H Research Methods and Project Execution (0.5 FCE) taken once during the program, typically in Year 1.

    • Courses must be selected from the calendar and approved by the student's supervisor and the Graduate Coordinator. At least one of these courses must be taken in a secondary area of study. It is recommended that one of these courses should be selected from Category A: fundamental courses.

    • Normally, PhD students are not allowed to take a 500-level course for credit towards the degree program.

  • Within 9 to 12 months of starting the PhD program, students must pass a qualifying examination.

  • All Year 1, Year 2, Year 3, and Year 4 students must complete CHE3001H Leading Edge Seminar Series in Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (Credit/No Credit; 0.0 FCE) in both the Fall and Winter sessions.

  • Students must complete CHE3010H PhD Research (Credit/No Credit; 0.0 FCE) every year following their PhD qualification exam.

  • If not already completed, students must take CHE2222H Safety Workshop (0.0 FCE) and JDE1000H Ethics in Research.

  • Thesis on a research topic.

  • Students normally remain in residence (full-time, on campus) until the departmental recommendation for the Doctoral Final Oral Examination is made, unless special permission to do so has otherwise been granted by the departmental Graduate Studies Committee.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Transfer)

Transfer Requirements

  • B+ (or equivalent) in each of the last two years of full-time study in the undergraduate program.

  • Applicants may enter the PhD program by transferring from the University of Toronto MASc program after completing one year; such students must successfully complete a bypass examination.

  • International applicants with a master's degree from outside Canada or the United States may be asked to register in the MASc program and follow the transfer route of entry.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete at least 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (six graduate half courses) and do not have to take a separate PhD qualifying examination.

    • One course must be CHE1102H Research Methods and Project Execution (0.5 FCE) taken once during the program, typically in Year 1.

    • Courses must be selected from the calendar and approved by the student's supervisor and the Graduate Coordinator. At least one of these courses must be taken in a secondary area of study. It is recommended that one of these courses should be selected from Category A: fundamental courses.

    • Normally, PhD students are not allowed to take a 500-level course for credit towards the degree program.

  • All Year 1, Year 2, Year 3, and Year 4 students must complete CHE3001H Leading Edge Seminar Series in Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (Credit/No Credit; 0.0 FCE) in both the Fall and Winter sessions.

  • Students must complete CHE3010H PhD Research (Credit/No Credit; 0.0 FCE) every year following their transfer exam from the MASc program.

  • If not already completed, students must take CHE2222H Safety Workshop (0.5 FCE) and JDE1000H Ethics in Research.

  • Thesis on a research topic.

  • Students normally remain in residence (full-time, on campus) until the departmental recommendation for the Doctoral Final Oral Examination is made, unless special permission to do so has otherwise been granted by the departmental Graduate Studies Committee.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Minimum A– average in each of the final two years of study in the undergraduate program, and participation in a research project (either through an undergraduate thesis or through research conducted in a lab).

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete at least 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (six graduate half courses).

    • One course must be CHE1102H Research Methods and Project Execution (0.5 FCE) taken once during the program, typically in Year 1.

    • Courses must be selected from the calendar and approved by the student's supervisor and the Graduate Coordinator. At least one of these courses must be taken in a secondary area of study. It is recommended that one of these courses should be selected from Category A: fundamental courses.

    • Normally, PhD students are not allowed to take a 500-level course for credit towards the degree program.

  • Within 9 to 12 months of starting the PhD program, students must pass a qualifying examination.

  • All Year 1, Year 2, Year 3, and Year 4 students must complete CHE3001H Leading Edge Seminar Series in Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (Credit/No Credit; 0.0 FCE) in both the Fall and Winter sessions.

  • Students must complete CHE3010H PhD Research (Credit/No Credit; 0.0 FCE) every year following their PhD qualification exam.

  • If not already completed, students must take CHE2222H Safety Workshop (0.5 FCE) and JDE1000H Ethics in Research.

  • Thesis on a research topic.

  • Students normally remain in residence (full-time, on campus) until the departmental recommendation for the Doctoral Final Oral Examination is made, unless special permission to do so has otherwise been granted by the departmental Graduate Studies Committee.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

 

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • B+ (or equivalent) in each of the last two years of full-time study in the undergraduate program, and successful completion of a research master's degree with an overall average of at least B+ (or equivalent).

  • Applicants may enter the PhD following completion of an MASc program with a minimum B+ average and exceptional all-around scientific and intellectual ability as evidenced from theoretical or experimental research, academic standing, initiative, and publication record.

  • Applicants to the flexible-time PhD option are accepted under the same admission requirements as applicants to the full-time PhD option. However, applicants to the flexible-time PhD option must also demonstrate that they are actively engaged in professional activities related to their proposed program of study.

Program Requirements

  • Students in the flexible-time option will be subject to the same requirements as students in the full-time option.

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete at least 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (four graduate half courses).

    • One course must be CHE1102H Research Methods and Project Execution (0.5 FCE) taken once during the program, typically in Year 1.

    • Courses must be selected from the calendar and approved by the student's supervisor and the Graduate Coordinator. At least one of these courses must be taken in a secondary area of study. It is recommended that one of these courses should be selected from Category A: fundamental courses.

    • Normally, PhD students are not allowed to take a 500-level course for credit towards the degree program.

  • Within 16 months of starting the PhD program, students must pass a qualifying examination.

  • All Year 1, Year 2, Year 3, and Year 4 students must complete CHE3001H Leading Edge Seminar Series in Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (Credit/No Credit; 0.0 FCE) in both the Fall and Winter sessions.

  • Students must complete CHE3010H PhD Research (Credit/No Credit; 0.0 FCE) every year following their PhD qualification exam.

  • If not already completed, students must take CHE2222H Safety Workshop (0.5 FCE) and JDE1000H Ethics in Research.

  • Thesis on a research topic.

  • Students normally remain in residence (full-time, on campus) until the departmental recommendation for the Doctoral Final Oral Examination is made, unless special permission to do so has otherwise been granted by the departmental Graduate Studies Committee.

  • Students in the PhD program have the option of completing an emphasis in Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

6 years

Time Limit

8 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Transfer)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)
Program Length: 6 years
Time Limit: 8 years

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Chemistry: Chemistry MSc

Master of Science

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the department's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university with an average equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete 1.0 graduate full-course equivalent (FCE) including at least 0.5 graduate half-course equivalent in chemistry.

  • Students must participate in a seminar program. Attendance and presentation of a seminar are mandatory in order to receive the credit.

  • In Year 1, students must complete the modules in CHM3000H Graduate Professional Development for Research and Teaching in Chemistry (0.5 FCE; Credit/No Credit).

  • Submission of a thesis.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis



Master of Science
Program Length: 3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time


 

Chemistry
Chemistry: Chemistry MSc, PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please consult the department each session as to course availability.

All graduate courses for degree credit must be approved by the department. Subject to departmental permission, degree students in chemistry may take a limited number of graduate courses based on fourth-year Faculty of Arts and Science courses in chemistry or a cognate discipline. Approvals of such fourth-year courses will be considered on an individual basis. Third-year arts and science courses, or their essential equivalents, will not receive degree credit.

Professional Development

Course Code Course Title
CHM3000H Graduate Professional Development for Research and Teaching in Chemistry (Credit/No Credit)

Analytical Chemistry

Course Code Course Title
CHM1102H
Biosensors and Chemical Sensors
CHM1103H
Advanced Topics in Analytical Chemistry
CHM1104H
Separation Science
CHM1105H
Separations, Chromatography, and Microfluidics
CHM1106H
Lab Instrumentation
CHM1107H The -Omics Revolution and Mass Spectrometry
CHM1150H
Advances in Electroanalytical Chemistry and Electrochemical Sensors
CHM1190Y
Analytical Chemistry Seminar (Credit/No Credit)
CHM1410H
Analytical Environmental Chemistry
CHM2014H
Research in Analytical Chemistry

Environmental Chemistry

Course Code Course Title
CHM1401H Transport and Fate of Chemical Species in the Environment
CHM1404H
Molecular Analysis of Natural Systems
CHM1410H
Analytical Environmental Chemistry
CHM1415H
Atmospheric Chemistry
CHM1420H
Environmental Chemistry of Soil
CHM1425H
Modelling the Fate of Organic Chemicals in the Environment
CHM1430H
Advanced Topics in Atmospheric Chemistry
CHM1590Y
Environmental Chemistry Seminar (Credit/No Credit)
CHM2534H
Research in Environmental Chemistry
EES1105H
Soil Contamination Chemistry

Inorganic Chemistry

Course Code Course Title
CHM1204H
Organometallic Chemistry and Catalysis
CHM1205H
Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms
CHM1206H
Solid State Chemistry: Structure-Property Relations
CHM1258H
Reactions of Coordinated Ligands
CHM1263H
Bio-inorganic Chemistry
CHM1268H
X-Ray Crystallography
CHM1269H
Nanochemistry: A Chemistry Approach to Nanomaterials
CHM1270H
Frontiers in Inorganic Chemistry (core course)
CHM1290Y
Inorganic Chemistry Seminar (Credit/No Credit)
CHM2034H
Research in Inorganic Chemistry

Organic and Biological Chemistry

Course Code Course Title
CHM1003H
Physical Organic Chemistry II
CHM1004H
Synthetic Organic Chemistry
CHM1005H
Applications of Spectroscopy in Organic Structure Determination
CHM1006H
Bioorganic Chemistry
CHM1008H
Biological Chemistry
CHM1040H
Modern Organic Synthesis
CHM1045H
Modern Physical Organic Chemistry
CHM1051H
Current Topics in Chemical Biology
CHM1054H
Topics in Bio-organic Chemistry
CHM1056H
Techniques for Studying the Chemical, Structural, and Dynamic Properties of Biomolecules
CHM1057H
Topics in Synthetic Organic Chemistry
CHM1059H Chemical Biology in Complex Systems
CHM1060H
Advanced Topics in Synthetic Organic Chemistry
CHM1068H
Topics in Biological and Medicinal Chemistry
CHM1090Y
Organic Chemistry Seminar (Credit/No Credit)
CHM2044H
Research in Organic Chemistry

Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Course Code Course Title
CHM1441H
Mathematical Methods
CHM1443H
Intermediate Quantum Mechanics
CHM1448H
Modelling of Biochemical Systems
CHM1450H
Nanoscale Characterization with Scan Probe Microscopy
CHM1455H
NMR Spectroscopy I: Basic Theory and Applications for Biological Chemists
CHM1464H
Topics in Statistical Mechanics
CHM1478H
Quantum Mechanics for Physical Chemists (core course)
CHM1480H
Basic Statistical Mechanics (core course)
CHM1481H Reaction Kinetics and Dynamics
CHM1482H
Laser Spectroscopy and Photophysics
CHM1490Y
Physical Chemistry Seminar (Credit/No Credit)
CHM2024H
Research in Physical Chemistry

Polymers and Materials Chemistry

Course Code Course Title
CHM1206H
Solid State Chemistry: Structure-Property Relations
CHM1300H
Polymer Chemistry
CHM1301H
Organic and Inorganic Polymer Synthesis
CHM1302H
Physical Chemistry of Polymers
CHM1304H
Organic Materials Chemistry
CHM1390Y
Polymer and Materials Chemistry Seminar (Credit/No Credit)
CHM2304H
Research in Polymer and Materials Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry: Chemistry PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Applicants may enter the PhD program via one of three routes: 1) following completion of an appropriate master’s degree; 2) transfer from the University of Toronto master’s program; or 3) direct entry following completion of an appropriate BSc degree.

PhD students select one of the following fields:

  • Analytical Chemistry

  • Environmental Chemistry

  • Inorganic Chemistry

  • Organic and Biological Chemistry

  • Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics

  • Polymers and Materials Chemistry

  • Interdisciplinary, which allows combinations with the other fields, or with other disciplines

Each field requires a minimum of 2.0 to 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) from approved graduate courses, depending on the field of study and the student's academic background. The number of courses required will be determined in consultation with the supervisor. Students who have completed the master's program may be considered for a course reduction of up to 1.0 FCE in the PhD program. Specific requirements for each field follow.

 

Field: Analytical Chemistry

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Appropriate master's degree from a recognized university with a minimum average equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+.

  • An exceptional student with an appropriate BSc degree may be admitted directly to the PhD program.

  • Transfer to the PhD program may be considered during Year 1 of the master's program.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) from approved graduate courses:

    • 0.5 FCE in analytical chemistry in each of the areas of spectroscopy, separation science/electrochemistry, and advanced instrumentation/data analysis.

    • An additional 0.5 FCE to support the research program.

    • The number of courses required will be determined in consultation with the supervisor. Students who have completed the master's program may be considered for a course reduction of up to 1.0 FCE in the PhD program.

  • Presentation of two seminars. Participation in the Analytical Chemistry Seminar (CHM1190Y). Students must complete 25 Analytical Seminar Plus (ASP) points (PDF).

  • In Year 1, students must complete the modules in CHM3000H Graduate Professional Development for Research and Teaching in Chemistry (0.5 FCE; Credit/No Credit).

  • Students must complete a minimum of 18 hours (24 hours for direct-entry students) of additional professional development training spread evenly over the categories: Communication, Personal Effectiveness, and Research and Teaching Skills. Consult with the Graduate Office for a list of eligible activities.

  • Successful completion of an oral comprehensive field examination in Analytical Chemistry.

  • The main requirement for the PhD program is the execution of an original investigation that is presented in a thesis.

Program Length

4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry

Time Limit

6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

 

Field: Environmental Chemistry

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Appropriate master's degree from a recognized university with a minimum average equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+.

  • An exceptional student with an appropriate BSc degree may be admitted directly to the PhD program.

  • Transfer to the PhD program may be considered during Year 1 of the master's program.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) from approved graduate courses:

    • CHM1401H Transport and Fate of Chemical Species in the Environment (0.5 FCE).

    • At least one other course in Environmental Chemistry.

    • At least one CHM course to be chosen in consultation with the supervisor/supervisory committee and confirmed by the field representative.

    • The fourth course may be an approved course offered in a cognate department.

  • In Year 1, students must complete the modules in CHM3000H Graduate Professional Development for Research and Teaching in Chemistry (0.5 FCE; Credit/No Credit).

  • Students must complete a minimum of 18 hours (24 hours for direct-entry students) of additional professional development training spread evenly over the categories: Communication, Personal Effectiveness, and Research and Teaching Skills. Consult with the Graduate Office for a list of eligible activities.

  • Presentation of two seminars (normally in Years 2 and 4). Participation in the Environmental Chemistry Seminar and colloquia program (CHM1590Y).

  • A written research proposal, defended orally, on a topic other than the primary research topic delivered prior to the end of Year 2.

  • Successful completion of an oral comprehensive field examination in Environmental Chemistry, normally completed following coursework and before the end of Year 2.

  • The main requirement for the PhD program is the execution of an original investigation that is presented in a thesis.

Program Length

4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry

Time Limit

6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

 

Field: Inorganic Chemistry

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Appropriate master's degree from a recognized university with a minimum average equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+.

  • An exceptional student with an appropriate BSc degree may be admitted directly to the PhD program.

  • Transfer to the PhD program may be considered during Year 1 of the master's program.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) from approved graduate courses:

    • One core half course (0.5 FCE): CHM 1270 or CHM1266H.

  • In Year 1, students must complete the modules in CHM3000H Graduate Professional Development for Research and Teaching in Chemistry (0.5 FCE; Credit/No Credit).

  • Students must complete a minimum of 18 hours (24 hours for direct-entry students) of additional professional development training spread evenly over the categories: Communication, Personal Effectiveness, and Research and Teaching Skills. Consult with the Graduate Office for a list of eligible activities.

  • Participation in the Inorganic Chemistry Seminar (CHM1290Y): the presentation of one seminar each year in Years 2, 3, and 4, including one on an original research proposal.

  • Successful completion of an oral comprehensive field examination in Inorganic Chemistry.

  • The main requirement for the PhD program is the execution of an original investigation that is presented in a thesis.

Program Length

4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry

Time Limit

6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

 

Field: Organic and Biological Chemistry

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Appropriate master's degree from a recognized university with a minimum average equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+.

  • An exceptional student with an appropriate BSc degree may be admitted directly to the PhD program.

  • Transfer to the PhD program may be considered during Year 1 of the master's program.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) from approved graduate courses:

    • At least two Organic Chemistry graduate half courses selected from CHM1040H to CHM1068H (inclusive).

    • Students may be required to take courses offered in physical organic, synthetic organic, and biological chemistry. The courses will be selected in consultation with the supervisor and confirmed by the Graduate Studies Committee field representative.

  • Students must pass six cumulative exams in order for students to qualify to give the oral comprehensive field exam and advance to PhD candidacy. They are generally written on the first Friday of the month from October through May (inclusive).

  • In Year 1, students must complete the modules in CHM3000H Graduate Professional Development for Research and Teaching in Chemistry (0.5 FCE; Credit/No Credit).

  • Students must complete a minimum of 18 hours (24 hours for direct-entry students) of additional professional development training spread evenly over the categories: Communication, Personal Effectiveness, and Research and Teaching Skills. Consult with the Graduate Office for a list of eligible activities.

  • Participation in the Organic Chemistry Seminar (CHM1090Y): present two seminars, normally in Years 2 and 4.

  • Upon completion of coursework and cumulative exams, students will take an oral comprehensive field exam in Organic and Biological Chemistry.

  • The main requirement for the PhD program is the execution of an original investigation that is presented in a thesis.

Program Length

4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry

Time Limit

6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

 

Field: Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Appropriate master's degree from a recognized university with a minimum average equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+.

  • An exceptional student with an appropriate BSc degree may be admitted directly to the PhD program.

  • Transfer to the PhD program may be considered during Year 1 of the master's program.

Program Requirements

  • Students may select an Experimental Physical Chemistry path requiring:

    • 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) consisting of a combination of two core half courses and two other half courses. The principle is that breadth of background preparation should be the major objective in course selection.

  • Or students may select a Theoretical Physical Chemistry path requiring:

    • 3.0 FCEs, including two core half courses. Specifics are to be determined by the research director and the student.

  • In Year 1, students must complete the modules in CHM3000H Graduate Professional Development for Research and Teaching in Chemistry (0.5 FCE; Credit/No Credit).

  • Students must complete a minimum of 18 hours (24 hours for direct-entry students) of additional professional development training spread evenly over the categories: Communication, Personal Effectiveness, and Research and Teaching Skills. Consult with the Graduate Office for a list of eligible activities.

  • Presentation of two seminars, normally in Years 2 and 4. Participation in the Physical Chemistry Seminar (CHM1490Y).

  • Successful completion of an oral comprehensive field examination in Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics.

  • The main requirement for the PhD program is the execution of an original investigation that is presented in a thesis.

Program Length

4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry

Time Limit

6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

 

Field: Polymers and Materials Chemistry

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Appropriate master's degree from a recognized university with a minimum average equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+.

  • An exceptional student with an appropriate BSc degree may be admitted directly to the PhD program.

  • Transfer to the PhD program may be considered during Year 1 of the master's program.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) from approved graduate courses:

    • At least one of the three core courses (CHM1206H, CHM1301H, CHM1302H).

    • A list of other courses considered appropriate to the Polymers and Materials Chemistry research area is available from the department.

  • In Year 1, students must complete the modules in CHM3000H Graduate Professional Development for Research and Teaching in Chemistry (0.5 FCE; Credit/No Credit).

  • Students must complete a minimum of 18 hours (24 hours for direct-entry students) of additional professional development training spread evenly over the categories: Communication, Personal Effectiveness, and Research and Teaching Skills. Consult with the Graduate Office for a list of eligible activities.

  • Presentation of at least three seminars (a literature talk in Year 1 and presentations on the original research in Years 2 and 4). Participation in the Polymers and Materials Chemistry Seminar (CHM1390Y).

  • Upon the completion of coursework, successful performance in an oral comprehensive field examination in Polymers and Materials Chemistry.

  • The main requirement for the PhD program is the execution of an original investigation that is presented in a thesis.

Program Length

4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry

Time Limit

6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

 

Field: Interdisciplinary

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Chemistry's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Appropriate master's degree from a recognized university with a minimum average equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+.

  • An exceptional student with an appropriate BSc degree may be admitted directly to the PhD program.

  • Transfer to the PhD program may be considered during Year 1 of the master's program.

  • Acceptance into this field requires a research topic of a truly interdisciplinary nature; a written request must be submitted to the Graduate Coordinator.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including one core half course from the above fields.

  • In Year 1, students must complete the modules in CHM3000H Graduate Professional Development for Research and Teaching in Chemistry (0.5 FCE; Credit/No Credit).

  • Students must complete a minimum of 18 hours (24 hours for direct-entry students) of additional professional development training spread evenly over the categories: Communication, Personal Effectiveness, and Research and Teaching Skills. Consult with the Graduate Office for a list of eligible activities.

  • Presentation of at least two seminars (normally in Years 2 and 4). Participation in the seminar program of an existing field of Chemistry.

  • Upon completion of coursework, successful completion of an oral comprehensive field examination in the fields of Chemistry deemed appropriate.

  • The main requirement for the PhD program is the execution of an original investigation that is presented in a thesis.

Program Length

4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry

Time Limit

6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

Field: Analytical Chemistry
Program Length: 4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry
Time Limit: 6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

Environmental Chemistry
Program Length: 4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry
Time Limit: 6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

Inorganic Chemistry
Program Length: 4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry
Time Limit: 6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

Organic and Biological Chemistry
Program Length: 4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry
Time Limit: 6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics
Program Length: 4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry
Time Limit: 6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

Polymers and Materials Chemistry
Program Length: 4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry
Time Limit: 6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry 

Interdisciplinary
Program Length: 4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry
Time Limit: 6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

Chemistry
Cinema Studies: Cinema Studies MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

The course-based, one-year MA program offers students the option, during their third term, of pursuing either a professional internship or a major research paper of roughly 40 to 50 pages written under the supervision of a faculty advisor elected by the student. Students have the option to concurrently enrol in one of the collaborative specializations at U of T, such as Sexual Diversity Studies, Women and Gender Studies, or Transnational and Diaspora Studies, which entails also registering for their specific core courses. The MA in Cinema Studies is a full-time program.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Cinema Studies Institute's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Successful completion of an appropriate four-year University of Toronto bachelor's degree, or its equivalent from a recognized university.

  • Minimum B+ standing, demonstrated by an average grade in the final year, or over senior-level courses.

  • Successful completion of a minimum of 6.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) in cinema studies, or comparable program preparation.

  • A letter of intent addressing the academic goals an applicant wishes to pursue in the program.

  • Three letters of recommendation.

  • Transcripts from all post-secondary institutions.

  • An academic writing sample of no more than 3,000 words.

Program Requirements

  • The MA is a coursework-only program and therefore does not require a thesis.

  • Students must successfully complete a total of 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) over the course of an academic year, normally extending from September until August, as follows:

    • 1.0 FCE mandatory core courses: CIN1101H and CIN1102H.

    • 1.0 FCE devoted to either the writing of a major research paper (CIN1006Y) or pursuing an internship (CIN1007Y).

    • 2.0 FCEs may be completed in the following way:

      • from elective CIN courses chosen from rotating special topics courses, also under the CIN rubric, but possibly cross-listed with another department, depending on the instructor’s departmental home.

      • from film-related courses offered by other units (non-CIN designator) but approved as relevant to the Cinema Studies master's program curriculum.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework-only



Master of Arts
Program Length: 3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time


 

Cinema Studies
Cinema Studies: Cinema Studies MA, PhD Courses

Not all elective courses are offered every year. The department should be consulted each session as to elective and non-CIN course offerings.

MA Core Courses

Course Code Course Title
CIN1101H
Theories and Practices of Cinema
CIN1102H
Key Developments in Film History

Plus one of:

Course Code Course Title
CIN1006Y
Major Research Paper in Cinema Studies
CIN1007Y
Internship in Cinema Studies

PhD Core Courses

Course Code Course Title
CIN2100H
History and Historiography of Cinematic Media
CIN2101H
Pressures on the Cinematic
CIN2999H
Research Seminar in Cinema Studies (Credit/No Credit)

Elective Courses (Subject to Change)

Course Code Course Title
CIN1005H Special Studies in Cinema
CIN1008H Independent Research and Reading in Cinema Studies
CIN1011H Colour and the Moving Image
CIN1100H The Textual Object
CIN1772H The Politics of Non-Fiction Film
CIN3002H Cinema and Nation
CIN3004H Documentary and Non-fiction Media
CIN3006H Media and Philosophy
CIN3008H Topics in Film and Media History
CIN3010H Topics in Film and Media Theory
CIN6153H Race and Cinema
CIN6803H Intertextuality in Feminist Cinema: The Counter-Cinematic Impulse
JFF1100H Surrealism and French Cinema
JFF1101H The Art of Exploration: How to Think the World
JFF1102H Animages/Animots/Animotions
Cinema Studies
Cinema Studies: Cinema Studies PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

Launched in September 2013, the Doctor of Philosophy program in Cinema Studies addresses the changing role of moving image media within global culture. Past and present configurations of cinema are studied through a constellation of theoretical, textual, social, and historical rubrics. The core curricular offerings engage with debates and questions that persist within the scholarship while also examining how the field contends with emerging disciplinary issues and intermedial formats today and at earlier historical junctures. Throughout the program of study, the synthesis of history and theory, textual analysis, and cultural study is emphasized.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Cinema Studies Institute's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Letter of intent outlining the academic ambitions, including possible thesis topic, the applicant aims to pursue in the program.

  • Three letters of recommendation.

  • A writing sample.

  • Transcripts from all post-secondary institutions.

Program Requirements

  • The student's program of study must be approved by the Cinema Studies Institute (CSI).

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 1.0 FCE required courses: CIN2100H History and Historiography of Cinematic Media and CIN2101H Pressures on the Cinematic. Students who have already taken these courses, or their equivalent, will be required to enrol in alternate course selections, with the Graduate Coordinator's approval.

    • 1.5 FCEs offered in cinema studies.

    • 1.0 FCE elective courses offered in cinema studies or by other graduate units and chosen in consultation with the student's faculty advisor.

    • 0.5 FCE: CIN2999H Research Seminar in Cinema Studies (Credit/No Credit).

  • All coursework is normally completed by December of Year 2 of study, except for CIN2999H which may extend beyond that date.

  • Completion of one Qualifying Examination. Students generally undertake the Qualifying Examination after the completion of coursework in Year 2 of study.

    • The Qualifying Examination covers two special fields and has two components: a written examination and an oral examination. These exams are scheduled by the student’s supervisor and committee members. Examinations are marked on a pass/fail basis. (Should the committee deem their work exceptional, students may pass with distinction.) Students are allowed two attempts to pass the written examination and two attempts to pass the oral examination.

  • Students must have completed all requirements for the degree, exclusive of thesis research, by the end of Year 3 of study in order to remain in good academic standing and in order to achieve candidacy.

  • Completion of a PhD dissertation based on original research conducted by the candidate on an approved topic in cinema studies. The dissertation proposal should be approved by the supervisor no later than May of Year 2 of PhD studies. Each student is required to meet at least annually with a supervisory committee, which includes the supervisor and two faculty members, to review academic progress, and to consult about future directions.

  • The thesis must be presented within six years of first enrolment in the PhD program. Successful defence at the SGS Doctoral Final Oral Examination.

Program Length

4 years full-time

Time Limit

6 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy
Program Length: 4 years full-time
Time Limit: 6 years full-time


 

Cinema Studies
Civil and Mineral Engineering: Cities Engineering and Management MEngCEM

Master of Engineering in Cities Engineering and Management

Program Description

Cities are the economic engines of the world. Highly skilled professionals, armed with both technical expertise and a fundamental understanding of the cross-disciplinary issues, are needed to help our cities tackle challenges to ensure the well-being of their inhabitants and economies. In the Master of Engineering: Cities Engineering and Management (MEngCEM) program, students prepare for rewarding careers in government and the private sector, addressing the critical issues and growing needs of urban centres.

To proactively respond to the changing needs of cities, the MEngCEM program offers students a practicum to apply what they have learned in the classroom.

The MEngCEM program can be completed through full-time studies over three continuous sessions or through an extended full-time (EFT) option over six sessions.

 

Full-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Civil Engineering's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A completed undergraduate degree equivalent to a four-year University of Toronto program with a minimum final-year grade point average (GPA) of mid-B (3.0 out of 4.0 or 75%). Competitive admission averages are typically near or above 80% (A–).

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Applicants with backgrounds in an applied science other than engineering may be admitted.

  • Applicants must have one year of work experience before admission to the program.

Program Requirements

  • Students must successfully complete a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 4.0 FCEs (eight half courses) consisting of

      • four core courses:

        • CEM1001H The Challenges of Urban Policy-Making

        • CEM1002H Data Analytics and Cities

        • CEM1003H Infrastructure and Urban Prosperity

        • CEM1004H Cities as Complex Systems

      • three infrastructure engineering electives in one of eight specialization areas (see course listing below)

      • one technology management elective (see course listing below).

    • 1.0 FCE Practicum typically completed during the Summer of Year 1.

Program Length

3 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years

 

Extended Full-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Civil Engineering's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A completed undergraduate degree equivalent to a four-year University of Toronto program with a minimum final-year grade point average (GPA) of mid-B (3.0 out of 4.0 or 75%). Competitive admission averages are typically near or above 80% (A–).

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Applicants with backgrounds in an applied science other than engineering may be admitted.

  • Applicants must have one year of work experience before admission to the program.

Program Requirements

  • Students must successfully complete a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 4.0 FCEs (eight half courses) consisting of

      • four core courses:

        • CEM1001H The Challenges of Urban Policy-Making

        • CEM1002H Data Analytics and Cities

        • CEM1003H Infrastructure and Urban Prosperity

        • CEM1004H Cities as Complex Systems

      • three infrastructure engineering electives in one of eight specialization areas (see course listing below)

      • one technology management elective (see course listing below).

    • 1.0 FCE Practicum typically completed during the Summer of Year 2.

Program Length

6 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years

Coursework plus practicum



Master of Engineering in Cities Engineering and Management

Full-Time Option
Program Length: 3 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years

Extended Full-Time Option
Program Length: 6 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years

Civil and Mineral Engineering
Civil and Mineral Engineering: Cities Engineering and Management MEngCEM Courses

Courses must be approved by the Program Director.

Core Courses

Course Code Course Title
CEM1001H
The Challenges of Urban Policy-Making
CEM1002H
Empirical Study of Cities
CEM1003H
Infrastructure and Urban Prosperity
CEM1004H
Cities as Complex Systems
CEM1000Y
Cities Engineering and Management Practicum

Infrastructure Engineering Course Electives

Students must choose three courses in one of the following specialization areas: Cyber Security, Communications Networks, Environmental Issues for Healthy Cities, Operations Research, Resilience of Critical Infrastructure, Sustainable Energy Systems, Transportation, Urban Structures.

The course selection (subject to change) in each infrastructure engineering specialization area is:

Cybersecurity

Course Code Course Title
ECE568H Computer Security Planning
ECE1508H Special Topics in Communications
ECE1518H Seminar in Identity, Privacy, and Security
ECE1776H Computer Security, Cryptography, and Privacy

Communications Networks

Course Code Course Title
ECE1508H Special Topics in Communications
ECE1524H Service Provider Networks
ECE1541H Communication Networks I
ECE1545H Bridges and Routers Planning
ECE1548H Advanced Network Architectures

Environmental Issues for Health Cities

Course Code Course Title
CHE1433H Air Dispersion Modelling
CIV549H Groundwater Flow and Contamination
CIV1303H Water Resources Systems Modelling
CIV1308H Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes
CIV1309H Biological Treatment Processes
CIV1311H Advanced and Sustainable Drinking Water Treatment
CIV1330H Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Global Health

Operations Research

Course Code Course Title
MIE1603H Integer Programming
MIE1616H Research Topics in Healthcare Engineering
MIE1620H Linear Programming and Network Flows
MIE1621H Non-Linear Optimization
MIE1721H Reliability
MIE1723H Engineering Asset Management
MIE1727H Quality Assurance I

Resilience of Critical Infrastructure

Course Code Course Title
APS1024H Infrastructure Resilience Planning
APS1025H Infrastructure Protection
APS1031H Infrastructure Planning
URD1044H Urban Design and Development
URD2041H Business and Land Use Planning in Real Estate Development

Sustainable Energy Systems

Course Code Course Title
APS510H Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems
ECE1092H Smart Grid Case Studies
MIE515H Alternative Energy Systems
MIE1120H Current Energy Infrastructure and Resources
MIE1240H Wind Power
MIE1715H Life Cycle Engineering

Transportation

Course Code Course Title
CIV516H Public Transit Operations and Planning
CIV531H Transport III — Planning
CIV1506H Freight Transportation and ITS Applications
CIV1508H Airport Planning and Engineering
CIV1532H Fundamentals of ITS and Traffic Management
CIV1535H Transportation and Development
CIV1538H Transportation Demand Analysis
CIV1598H Special Studies in Civil Engineering — Transportation: Urban Operations Research

Urban Structures

Course Code Course Title
APS1024H Infrastructure Resilience Planning
APS1025H Infrastructure Protection
CIV576H Sustainable Buildings
CIV1164H Bridge Engineering
CIV1167H Advanced Structural Dynamics
CIV1169H Advanced Topics in Building Design
CIV1252H Repair and Maintenance of Concrete Structures

Technology Management Course Electives

The course list is subject to change.

Course Code Course Title
APS1001H
Project Management
APS1005H
Operations Research for Engineering Management
APS1009H
Natural Resources Management
APS1012H
Managing Business Innovation and Transformational Change
APS1015H
Social Entrepreneurship
APS1016H
Financial Management for Engineers
APS1017H
Supply Chain Management and Logistics
APS1024H
Infrastructure Resilience Planning
APS1025H
Infrastructure Protection
APS1031H
Infrastructure Planning
APS1036H
Formative Experiential Entrepreneurial Learning (FEEL)
APS1037H
Infrastructure Engineering in Remote First Nation Communities in Ontario
APS1038H
Strategic Sustainability Management for Businesses and Products
APS1039H
Enterprise Risk Management
APS1040H
Quality Control for Engineering Management
APS1088H
Business Planning and Execution for Canadian Entrepreneurs
APS1202H
Engineering and Sustainable Development
CHE1435H
Fundamentals of Aerosol Physics and Chemistry
CIV1307H
Life Cycle Assessment and Sustainability of Engineering Activities
TEP1010H Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership
Civil and Mineral Engineering
Civil and Mineral Engineering: Civil Engineering MASc

Master of Applied Science

Program Description

The MASc program includes a foundational base of graduate courses followed by a research thesis. Many research projects involve industrial partnerships and networking opportunities, project management experience, and collaboration with leading experts.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Civil Engineering's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A completed undergraduate degree equivalent to a four-year University of Toronto program with a minimum final-year grade point average (GPA) of a mid B (3.0 out of 4.0, or 75%). Required grades must be achieved in each of the final two years of undergraduate study. Competitive admission averages are typically near or above 80% (A–).

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Students who do not possess an undergraduate degree in civil engineering may be required to take more than the usual time and number of courses.

Program Requirements

  • Each student, in consultation with a staff member at the beginning of the program, will establish the distribution of time between coursework and thesis or design project.

  • Coursework. Normally, students must complete a minimum of 2.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (five half courses).

  • Research thesis.

  • Students must participate in the non-credit seminar course JDE1000H Ethics in Research during their first or second session of registration.

  • In addition to the core research area, students have the option of completing an emphasis in Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Civil Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis



Master of Applied Science
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time


 

Civil and Mineral Engineering
Civil and Mineral Engineering: Civil Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Courses

Not all courses are given every year. Some courses may require a prerequisite. Please consult the department.

General Interest

Course Code Course Title
APS1012H
Managing Business Innovation and Transformational Change
APS1043H Writing Your Own Patent Application
APS1070H
Foundations of Data Analytics and Machine Learning
APS1410H Waterpower Essentials
APS1411H Renewal of Waterpower Facilities
(prerequisite: APS1410H)
CIV1001H
MEng Project I
CIV1002Y
MEng Project II
CIV1099H
Special Studies in Civil Engineering
CIV1289H The Business of Knowledge in Civil Engineering
CIV1322H Quantitative Methods for Decision Making
CIV1504H
Applied Probability and Statistics for Civil Engineering
CIV1539H
Evaluation of Civil Engineering Systems
CIV1540H Urban Operations Research

Building Engineering

Course Code Course Title
CIV514H
Concrete Technology
CIV536H
Urban Activity, Air Pollution, and Health
CIV575H
Building Science
CIV576H
Sustainable Buildings
CIV577H
Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities
CIV578H
Design of Building Enclosures
CIV580H
Engineering and Management of Large Projects
CIV1201H
Concrete Technology and Non-Destructive Testing Principles
CIV1240H Building Performance Assessment
(prerequisite: CIV375, CIV575, or instructor approval)
CIV1250H
Instrumentation Techniques in Concrete Technology
CIV1252H
Repair and Maintenance of Concrete Structures
CIV1260H
Chemistry of Cements and Concrete
(prerequisite: CIV514H)
CIV1262H
Microscopy Applied to Concrete and Geomaterials
CIV1275H
Construction Modeling Methods
CIV1278H
Pre-Project Planning and Constructability Analysis
CIV1279H
Construction Contract Documents
CIV1280H
Building Envelope Design
CIV1281H
Asset Management
CIV1282H
Case Studies in Building Science
CIV1283H Advanced Asset Management: Quantitative Tools and Methods
CIV1285H Building Information Modelling
CIV1296H Special Studies in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1297H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1298H
New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1299H
New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering

Environmental Engineering

Course Code Course Title
CIV541H
Environmental Biotechnology
CIV549H
Groundwater Flow and Contamination
CIV550H
Water Resources Engineering
CIV1302H
Low Impact Development and Stormwater Systems
CIV1303H
Water Resources Systems Modelling
CIV1307H
Life Cycle Assessment of Engineering Activities
CIV1308H
Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes
CIV1309H
Biological Treatment Processes
CIV1311H
Advanced and Sustainable Drinking Water Treatment
CIV1319H
Chemistry and Analysis of Water and Wastes
CIV1320H
Indoor Air Quality
CIV1321H Large Scale Infrastructure and Sustainability
CIV1330H
Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Global Health
CIV1396H Special Studies in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1397H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1398H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1399H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1XXXH (pending approval) Design of Hydro and Wind Electric Plants
(exclusion: CIV401H)

Geomechanics

Course Code Course Title
CIV521H
Rock Mechanics
CIV523H
Geotechnical Design
CIV1404H
Material Fracture Dynamics: Experimental Methods
CIV1420H
Soil Properties and Behaviour
CIV1421H
Continuum Mechanics of Fluids and Solids
CIV1422H
Dynamic Response of Engineering Materials
CIV1429H
Advanced Rock Engineering: Rock Engineering in Fractured Rock Masses
CIV1430H Engineering Rock Mechanics
CIV1496H Special Studies in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1497H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1498H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1499H
New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CME500H
Fundamentals of Acid Rock Drainage
MIN511H
Integrated Mine Waste Engineering
MIN540H
Borehole Geophysics for Engineers and Geoscientists
MIN565H
Design and Support of Underground Mine Excavations

Structural Engineering

Course Code Course Title
CIV510H
Solid Mechanics II
CIV514H
Concrete Technology
CIV515H
Introduction to Structural Dynamics
CIV517H
Prestressed Concrete Structures
CIV518H
Behaviour and Design of Steel Structures
CIV519H
Structural Analysis II
CIV1163H
Mechanics of Reinforced Concrete
CIV1164H
Bridge Engineering
CIV1167H
Advanced Structural Dynamics
CIV1169H
Advanced Topics in Building Design
CIV1171H
Earthquake Engineering and Seismic Design
CIV1174H
Finite Element Methods in Structural Mechanics
CIV1175H
Design of Tubular Steel Structures
CIV1180H
Advanced Modeling Methods for Seismic Performance Assessment of Structures
CIV1190H
Structures Under Blast and Impact
CIV1196H Special Studies in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1197H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1198H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1199H
New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1361H
Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Structures

Transportation Engineering and Planning

Course Code Course Title
CIV516H
Public Transit Operations and Planning
CIV531H
Transport III — Planning
CIV1505H
Transportation Research Seminar
CIV1506H
Freight Transportation and ITS Applications
CIV1507H
Public Transport
CIV1508H
Airport Planning and Engineering
CIV1532H
Fundamentals of ITS and Traffic Management
CIV1535H
Transportation and Development
CIV1536H
Modelling Transport Emissions
CIV1538H
Transportation Demand Analysis
CIV1596H Special Studies in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1597H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1598H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
CIV1599H New Topics in Civil and Mineral Engineering
Civil and Mineral Engineering
Civil and Mineral Engineering: Civil Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases

Emphasis: Advanced Water Technologies (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete a total of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (four half courses). This includes at least one course (0.5 FCE) selected from the core course list. The remaining courses must be selected from the elective course list.

Core Courses (complete at least one):

CHE1150H Industrial Water Technology
CIV1308H Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes
CIV1309H Biological Treatment Processes
CIV1311H Advanced and Sustainable Drinking Water Treatment

Elective Courses (complete remaining courses):

CHE565H, CHE1213H, CHE1430H,
CIV541H, CIV549H, CIV550H, CIV1303H, CIV1319H, CIV1330H, CIV1399H, CIV1499H,
JCC1313H,
JNC2503H,
MIE1807H,
STA1004H.

Enrolment Contact

Enrolment in the emphasis is permitted at any time during the MEng program. After students are admitted to the normal MEng program, students may contact Prof. Ron Hofmann, (416) 946-7508.

Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and the successful completion of the MEng degree requirements, students will receive a transcript notation from the Faculty Graduate Studies office (subject to Prof. Hofmann’s recommendation).

 

Emphasis: Analytics (MEng only)

To be admitted to the emphasis in Analytics, MEng students must first successfully complete a prerequisite course APS1070H (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]).

Subsequently, to earn the emphasis, students must successfully complete four additional half courses (2.0 FCEs) from the list of core courses or elective courses. These must include at least one core course; the remaining courses must be selected from the list of elective courses.

Students must have completed the prerequisite course APS1070H before taking any of the core courses.

Prerequisite Course

APS1070H Foundations of Data Analytics and Machine Learning

Core Courses

CHE1147H Data Mining in Engineering
ECE1513H Introduction to Machine Learning (exclusions: CSC411H, CSC2515H, ECE421H, ECE1504H)
MIE1624H Introduction to Data Science and Analytics (exclusion: MIE1626H)
MIE1626H Data Science Methods and Quantitative Analysis (exclusion: MIE1624H)
MSE1065H Application of Artificial Intelligence in Materials Design (exclusion: MSE1063H).

Elective Courses

APS502H, APS1005H, APS1017H, APS1022H, APS1040H, APS1050H, APS1051H, APS1052H, APS1053H, APS1080H,
CEM1002H,
CHE507H, CHE1108H, CHE1148H, CHE1434H,
CIV1504H, CIV1506H, CIV1507H, CIV1532H, CIV1538H,
ECE537H, ECE1504H (exclusions: CSC411H, CSC2515H, ECE421H, ECE521H, ECE1513H), ECE1505H, ECE1510H, ECE1657H, ECE1778H, ECE1779H,
MIE562H, MIE1077H, MIE1413H, MIE1501H, MIE1512H, MIE1513H, MIE1517H, MIE1620H, MIE1621H, MIE1622H, MIE1623H, MIE1625H, MIE1628H, MIE1653H, MIE1666H, MIE1721H, MIE1723H, MIE1727H, MIE1769H,
MSE1063H (exclusion: MSE1065H).

 

Emphasis: Building Science (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete at least six half courses (3.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) with a combination of core and elective courses as detailed below. One or two of the optional courses may be a one-session (CIV1001H) or two-session (CIV1002Y) project (not listed below). Other courses may be considered but will require approval of the Building Science emphasis coordinator.

Core Courses (complete at least four):

CIV575H Building Science
CIV576H Sustainable Buildings
CIV578H Design of Building Enclosures
CIV1282H Case Studies in Building Science
CIV1320H Indoor Air Quality
MIE507H HVAC Fundamentals.

Elective Courses (others can be approved by the emphasis coordinator):

CIV514H, CIV536H, CIV577H, CIV1279H, CIV1299H,
MIE515H, MIE1240H.

 

Emphasis: Concrete (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete six of the following technical courses (3.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]), one or two of which may be a one-session (CIV1001H) or two-session (CIV1002Y) project (not listed below). Other courses may be considered but will require approval of the Concrete emphasis coordinator.

CIV514H, CIV517H, CIV1201H, CIV1250H, CIV1252H, CIV1260H, CIV1262H, CIV1275H, CIV1504H.

 

Emphasis: Construction Management (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete six of the following technical courses (3.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]), one or two of which may be a one-session (CIV1001H) or two-session (CIV1002Y) project (not listed below). Other courses may be considered but will require approval of the Construction Management emphasis coordinator.

APS1001H, APS1004H, APS1005H, APS1017H,
CIV1279H, CIV1281H, CIV1299H, CIV1307H, CIV1504H,
MIE562H, MIE1413H.

 

Emphasis: Engineering and Globalization (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete four half courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) from the following lists, with at least two half courses (or one full course) chosen from Group A.

Group A

APS510H, APS530H, APS1420H, JCR1000Y (full-year course).

Group B

APS1015H, APS1020H, APS1024H, CHL5700H, CIV1399H, JMG2020H.

Note: Students who choose to pursue an MEng project in their home department that aligns with the Centre for Global Engineering (CGEN)'s disciplinary focus, as deemed by the CGEN Director, may count the project as one required Group B course.

Students who complete the requirements of the emphasis in Engineering and Globalization and wish to obtain a notation on their transcript should contact the Faculty Graduate Studies office.

 

Emphasis: Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE) (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete any four of the following courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]):

Leadership

TEP1010H, TEP1011H, TEP1026H, TEP1027H, TEP1029H, TEP1030H, TEP1501H, TEP1502H, TEP1601H

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

APS1012H, APS1013H, APS1015H, APS1023H, APS1033H, APS1035H, APS1036H, APS1041H, APS1061H, APS1088H

Finance and Management

AER1601H, APS502H, APS1001H, APS1004H, APS1005H, APS1009H, APS1016H, APS1017H, APS1020H, APS1022H, APS1028H, APS1032H, APS1038H, APS1039H, APS1040H, APS1043H, APS1049H, APS1050H, APS1051H, APS1052H

Engineering and Society

APS510H, APS1018H, APS1024H, APS1025H, APS1031H, APS1034H, APS1101H, APS1420H.

 

Emphasis: Environmental Engineering (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete six of the following technical courses (3.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]), one or two of which may be a one-session (CIV1001H) or two-session (CIV1002Y) project (not listed below). Other courses may be considered but will require approval of the Environmental Engineering emphasis coordinator.

CHE1134H, CHE1150H, CHE1180H, CHE1431H, CHE1432H,
CHL5903H,
CIV541H, CIV549H, CIV550H, CIV577H, CIV1303H, CIV1307H, CIV1308H, CIV1311H, CIV1319H, CIV1320H, CIV1399H,
ENV1001H, ENV1701H,
JCC1313H,
JNC2503H,
MIE1240H.

 

Emphasis: Forensic Engineering (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete four courses (one core course and three elective courses) from the list below.

Core Course

MSE1031H Forensic Engineering.

Elective Courses

AER1604H,
APS1034H, APS1039H, APS1040H, APS1101H,
BME1480H, BME1800H, BME1801H, BME1802H,
CHE561H, CHE568H, CHE1213H, CHE1431H, CHE1432H, CHE1434H, CHE1436H,
CIV510H, CIV518H, CIV1163H, CIV1171H, CIV1174H, CIV1190H, CIV1201H, CIV1279H, CIV1282H, CIV1422H, CIV1429H,
JMB1050H,
JNC2503H,
MIE507H, MIE533H, MIE566H, MIE1301H, MIE1303H, MIE1411H, MIE1414H, MIE1514H, MIE1616H, MIE17108H, MIE1713H, MIE1714H, MIE1721H, MIE1723H, MIE1727H, MIE1804H,
MSE1015H, MSE1016H, MSE1022H, MSE1032H, MSE1067H.

 

Emphasis: Geomechanics (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete six of the following technical courses (3.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]), one or two of which may be a one-session (CIV1001H) or two-session (CIV1002Y) project (not listed below). Other courses may be considered but will require approval of the Geomechanics emphasis coordinator.

CIV523H, CIV1404H, CIV1419H, CIV1420H, CIV1429H, CIV1498H, CIV1499H,
MIN540H, MIN565H.

 

Emphasis: Structural Engineering (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete six of the following technical courses (3.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]), one or two of which may be a one-session (CIV1001H) or two-session (CIV1002Y) project (not listed below). Other courses may be considered but will require approval of the Structural Engineering emphasis coordinator.

CIV510H, CIV514H, CIV515H, CIV517H, CIV518H, CIV519H, CIV1163H, CIV1164H, CIV1167H, CIV1169H, CIV1171H, CIV1174H, CIV1175H, CIV1180H, CIV1361H.

 

Emphasis: Sustainable Energy (MASc, MEng, PhD)

MASc and PhD students must successfully complete:

  • At least three half courses (1.5 full-course equivalents [FCEs]) from either of the following lists below.

  • A thesis towards their degree on a topic related to sustainable energy. Topics must be approved by the steering committee of the Institute of Sustainable Energy. Contact: Mandeep Rayat.

MEng students must successfully complete:

  • Four half courses (2.0 FCEs) from either of the following lists below, including at least one core course (0.5 FCE).

Core Courses

APS1032H Introduction to Energy Project Management,
MIE515H Alternative Energy Systems,
MIE1120H Current Energy Infrastructure and Resources.

Elective Courses

AER507H, AER1304H, AER1315H, AER1415H,
CHE568H, CHE1053H, CHE1118H, CHE1123H, CHE1142H, CHE1143H,
CIV575H, CIV576H, CIV577H, CIV1303H, CIV1307H,
ECE533H, ECE1030H, ECE1055H, ECE1057H, ECE1059H, ECE1085H, ECE1086H, ECE1092H, ECE1094H, ECE1476H,
MIE516H, MIE517H, MIE1128H, MIE1129H, MIE1130H, MIE1240H, MIE1715H,
MSE1023H, MSE1028H, MSE1058H.

Students who complete the requirements of the emphasis in Sustainable Energy will receive a notation on their transcript from the Faculty Graduate Studies Office following a recommendation from the Institute of Sustainable Energy. Contact: Mandeep Rayat.

 

Emphasis: Sustainable Urban Systems (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete six of the following technical courses (3.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]), one or two of which may be a one-session (CIV1001H) or two-session (CIV1002Y) project (not listed below). Other courses may be considered but will require approval of the Sustainable Urban Systems emphasis coordinator.

APS510H, APS1024H, APS1025H,
CIV514H, CIV516H, CIV531H, CIV575H, CIV576H, CIV577H, CIV1201H, CIV1252H, CIV1280H, CIV1303H, CIV1307H, CIV1535H,
ECE1092H,
ENV1001H,
MIE515H, MIE1120H, MIE1240H, MIE1715H.

 

Emphasis: Transportation Engineering and Planning (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete six of the following technical courses (3.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs]), one or two of which may be a one-session (CIV1001H) or two-session (CIV1002Y) project (not listed below). Other courses may be considered but will require approval of the Transportation Engineering and Planning emphasis coordinator.

CIV516H, CIV531H, CIV536H, CIV1307H, CIV1506H, CIV1508H, CIV1532H, CIV1535H, CIV1536H, CIV1538H.

 

Emphasis: Waterpower (MEng only)

MEng students must successfully complete four half courses (2.0 full-course equivalents [FCEs], including one core course. The remaining coursework may be taken from the following lists.

Core Course

APS1410H Waterpower Essentials.

Group A (complete at least one)

APS1411H (prerequisite: APS1410H),
CIV550H.

Group B (complete at least one)

AER1410H,
APS1024H, APS1032H,
CIV514H, CIV523H, CIV580H, CIV1001H, CIV1163H, CIV1171H, CIV1252H, CIV1275H, CIV1279H, CIV1281H, CIV1303H, CIV1399H, CIV1420H,
CIV1XXXH Design of Hydro and Wind Electric Plants (pending approval; exclusion: CIV401H),
ECE514H, ECE533H, ECE1049H, ECE1059H, ECE1093H, ECE1094H,
ENV1001H, ENV1701H, ENV1703H,
MIE1201H, MIE1207H, MIE1210H, MIE1222H, MIE1241H.

Civil and Mineral Engineering
Civil and Mineral Engineering: Civil Engineering MEng

Master of Engineering

Program Description

The MEng program is course based and intended to provide continuing and advanced education for recent graduates and civil engineers in professional practice. The program can be taken on a full-time, extended full-time, or part-time basis.

 

Full-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Civil Engineering's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A completed undergraduate degree equivalent to a four-year University of Toronto program with a minimum final-year grade point average (GPA) of a mid-B (3.0 out of 4.0 or 75%). Required grades must be achieved in each of the final two years of undergraduate study.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Students who do not possess an undergraduate degree in civil engineering may be required to take more than the usual time and number of courses.

Program Requirements

  • Each student, in consultation with a staff member at the beginning of the program, will establish the distribution of time between coursework and thesis or design project.

  • Coursework. Normally, students must complete 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (10 half courses). Up to two half courses (1.0 FCE) may be replaced by a research/design project.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Advanced Water Technologies; Analytics; Building Science; Concrete; Construction Management; Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE); Environmental Engineering; Forensic Engineering; Geomechanics; Structural Engineering; Sustainable Energy; Sustainable Urban Systems; or Transportation Engineering and Planning as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Civil Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

3 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years

 

Extended Full-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Civil Engineering's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A completed undergraduate degree equivalent to a four-year University of Toronto program with a minimum final-year grade point average (GPA) of a mid-B (3.0 out of 4.0 or 75%). Required grades must be achieved in each of the final two years of undergraduate study.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Students who do not possess an undergraduate degree in civil engineering may be required to take more than the usual time and number of courses.

Program Requirements

  • Each student, in consultation with a staff member at the beginning of the program, will establish the distribution of time between coursework and thesis or design project.

  • Coursework. Normally, students must complete 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (10 half courses). Up to two half courses (1.0 FCE) may be replaced by a research/design project.

  • Students are expected to complete the requirements in six sessions (two years) and are limited to six half courses per year and three half courses per session.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Advanced Water Technologies; Analytics; Building Science; Concrete; Construction Management; Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE); Environmental Engineering; Forensic Engineering; Geomechanics; Structural Engineering; Sustainable Energy; Sustainable Urban Systems; or Transportation Engineering and Planning as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Civil Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

6 sessions extended full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years

 

Part-Time Option

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Civil Engineering's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A completed undergraduate degree equivalent to a four-year University of Toronto program with a minimum final-year grade point average (GPA) of a mid-B (3.0 out of 4.0 or 75%). Required grades must be achieved in each of the final two years of undergraduate study.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Students who do not possess an undergraduate degree in civil engineering may be required to take more than the usual time and number of courses.

Program Requirements

  • Each student, in consultation with a staff member at the beginning of the program, will establish the distribution of time between coursework and thesis or design project.

  • Coursework. Normally, students must complete 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (10 half courses). Up to two half courses (1.0 FCE) may be replaced by a research/design project.

  • Students are limited to four half courses per year and two half courses per session. Students normally complete the requirements in nine sessions.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Advanced Water Technologies; Analytics; Building Science; Concrete; Construction Management; Engineering and Globalization; Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE); Environmental Engineering; Forensic Engineering; Geomechanics; Structural Engineering; Sustainable Energy; Sustainable Urban Systems; or Transportation Engineering and Planning as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Civil Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

9 sessions

Time Limit

6 years

1. Coursework-only or 2. Coursework plus thesis or 3. Coursework plus project



Master of Engineering

Full-Time Option
Program Length: 3 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years

Extended Full-Time Option
Program Length: 6 sessions extended full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years

Part-Time Option
Program Length: 9 sessions
Time Limit: 6 years
 

Civil and Mineral Engineering
Civil and Mineral Engineering: Civil Engineering PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The PhD program is designed for outstanding individuals interested in a rewarding career in fundamental or applied research. This program involves advanced courses and an intensive research program culminating in a thesis.

Applicants may enter the PhD program via one of three routes: 1) following completion of an MASc degree in engineering, mathematics, physics, or chemistry; 2) transfer from the University of Toronto MASc program; 3) direct entry following completion of a bachelor’s degree.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Civil Engineering's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A completed undergraduate degree equivalent to a four-year University of Toronto program with a minimum final-year grade point average (GPA) of B+ (3.3 out of 4.0 or 78%). Required grades must be achieved in each of the final two years of undergraduate study. Competitive admission averages are typically near or above 80% (A–).

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department of the ability to undertake advanced research.

  • Admission directly from a bachelor's degree is permitted in exceptional cases.

  • If a student transfers from a master's degree program to a PhD program, courses taken during the master's program may be applied to the PhD program.

Program Requirements

  • Students with an MASc degree (or equivalent in the same area of study) must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (four half courses).

  • Students with an MEng degree must complete a minimum of 4.5 FCEs (nine half courses). Up to 3.0 FCEs (six graduate half courses) may be used from the MEng program towards the PhD course requirements.

  • Students enrolled in the MASc degree program who transfer to the PhD program must complete a total of 4.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (nine half courses).

  • For direct-entry students, more FCEs may be required depending on the student's background preparation. It is normally expected that at least one of the half courses will be taken outside of the student's principal area of research.

  • Comprehensive examination after completing most of the coursework and preferably within one year after first enrolment in the PhD program. This examination consists of a four- to five-day take-home written examination, followed approximately a week later by an oral examination. The examination is administered by a Comprehensive Examination Committee created and supervised by the department's Graduate Studies Committee.

  • Residence. Students normally must spend at least two academic years of their program on campus on a full-time basis.

  • The academic program must be approved by the department's Graduate Studies Committee during the student's first session.

  • Students must participate in the non-credit seminar course JDE1000H Ethics in Research during their first or second session of registration.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Civil Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry

Time Limit

6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry

 

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Civil Engineering's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A completed undergraduate degree equivalent to a four-year University of Toronto program with a minimum final-year grade point average (GPA) of B+ (3.3 out of 4.0 or 78%). Required grades must be achieved in each of the final two years of undergraduate study. Competitive admission averages are typically near or above 80% (A–).

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must demonstrate proficiency in English. See General Regulations section 4.3 for requirements.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department of the ability to undertake advanced research.

  • In addition, applicants must demonstrate that they are actively engaged in professional activities related to their proposed program of study.

Program Requirements

  • Students with an MASc degree (or equivalent in the same area of study) must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (four half courses).

  • Students with an MEng degree must complete a minimum of 4.5 FCEs (nine half courses). Up to 3.0 FCEs (six graduate half courses) may be used from the MEng program towards the PhD course requirements.

  • Students enrolled in the MASc degree program who transfer to the PhD program must complete a total of 4.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) (nine half courses).

  • For direct-entry students, more FCEs may be required depending on the student's background preparation. It is normally expected that at least one of the half courses will be taken outside of the student's principal area of research.

  • Comprehensive examination after completing most of the coursework and preferably within one year after first enrolment in the PhD program. This examination consists of a four- to five-day take-home written examination, followed approximately a week later by an oral examination. The examination is administered by a Comprehensive Examination Committee created and supervised by the department's Graduate Studies Committee.

  • Residence. Students normally must spend at least two academic years of their program on campus on a full-time basis.

  • Students must participate in the non-credit seminar course JDE1000H Ethics in Research during their first or second session of registration.

  • Students have the option of completing an emphasis in Sustainable Energy as part of their degree program. Please see details in the Civil Engineering MASc, MEng, PhD Emphases section.

Program Length

6 years

Time Limit

8 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy
Program Length: 4 years full-time; 5 years transfer-from-master's; 5 years direct-entry; 6 years flexible-time
Time Limit: 6 years full-time; 7 years transfer-from-master's; 7 years direct-entry; 8 years flexible-time

Civil and Mineral Engineering
Classics: Classics MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

Applicants may be admitted to either the two-year MA program or the one-year advanced-standing option, depending on their level of preparation. At the time of application, students are encouraged to indicate their preference for one of the three fields offered: Greek and Roman History and Material Culture, Greek and Roman Literature, and Ancient Philosophy. The MA program may be taken on a part-time basis.

 

MA Program (Two-Year)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Classics' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Successful completion of an appropriate bachelor's program in classics or a related field, with at least a B+ average in the final year. For applicants who expect to focus on the areas of Greek and Roman Literature or Ancient Philosophy, the equivalent of three years of training in either Greek or Latin and two years of training in the other language is recommended. For applicants who expect to focus on the area of Greek and Roman History and Material Culture, the equivalent of three years of training in either Greek or Latin and demonstrated excellence in the study of Greek and Roman history and material culture is recommended.

  • Students who are otherwise qualified but who lack the required amount of training in Greek and Latin or in Greek and Roman history and material culture should consult with the department about further preparation.

Program Requirements

  • Year 1: Students normally complete at least 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) selected in consultation with the Graduate Coordinator from departmental language courses and seminars. Students who do not complete these courses with appropriate standing may be required to withdraw from the MA program or to retake the courses.

  • Year 2: Students normally complete at least 3.0 FCEs, including the Graduate Research Paper, selected in consultation with the Graduate Coordinator, and complete the sight translation examination and qualifying examination(s) required by the field they have chosen in consultation with the Graduate Coordinator.

    • Completion of one (0.5 FCE) of GRK1000H or LAT1000H (intensive advanced language skills), or equivalent, or a course from the GRK/LAT1800H series, with a grade of at least B–.

    • Completion of three additional graduate courses (1.5 FCEs).

    • Completion of the Ancient History methods course (CLA3020Y), only for students whose area is Greek and Roman History and Material Culture.

    • Completion of CLA2000Y (1.0 FCE) Graduate Research Paper with a grade of at least B. Each student is assigned to a faculty advisor for CLA2000Y and works independently on the preparation of a research paper (about 8,000 words in length). The Graduate Research Paper is assessed by a committee of two faculty members, including the advisor.

    • Completion of the sight translation examination in either Greek or Latin with a grade of at least B–.

    • Completion of the Greek qualifying examination and the Latin qualifying examination (three-hour translation exam in each language, including both prose and poetry) with a grade of at least B–. Students whose field is Greek and Roman History and Material Culture may choose to satisfy this requirement by:

      • completing either the Greek or the Latin qualifying examination with a grade of at least B– and by completing one language course in the other language with a grade of at least B+, or by

      • earning credit for the relative 1000H Advanced Language Studies course.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S);
9 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

 

MA Program (One-Year Advanced-Standing Option)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Classics' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Successful completion of an appropriate bachelor's program in classics or a related field, with at least a B+ average in the final year. For applicants who expect to focus on the areas of Greek and Roman Literature or Ancient Philosophy, the equivalent of at least three and preferably four years of training in Greek and Latin is recommended. For applicants who expect to focus on the area of Greek and Roman History and Material Culture, the equivalent of three years of training in either Greek or Latin and demonstrated excellence in the study of Greek and Roman history and material culture is recommended.

  • Students who are otherwise qualified but who lack the required amount of training in Greek and Latin or in Greek and Roman history and material culture should consult with the department about further preparation.


Program Requirements

  • Students normally complete at least 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs), including the Graduate Research Paper, selected in consultation with the Graduate Coordinator, and complete the sight translation examination and qualifying examination(s).

    • Completion of one (0.5 FCE) of GRK1000H or LAT1000H (intensive advanced language skills), or equivalent, or a course from the GRK/LAT1800H series, with a grade of at least B–.

    • Completion of three additional graduate courses (1.5 FCEs).

    • Completion of the Ancient History methods course (CLA3020Y), only for students whose area is Greek and Roman History and Material Culture.

    • Completion of CLA2000Y (1.0 FCE) Graduate Research Paper with a grade of at least B. Each student is assigned to a faculty advisor for CLA2000Y and works independently on the preparation of a research paper (about 8,000 words in length). The Graduate Research Paper is assessed by a committee of two faculty members, including the advisor.

    • Completion of the sight translation examination in either Greek or Latin with a grade of at least B–.

    • Completion of the Greek qualifying examination and the Latin qualifying examination (three-hour translation exam in each language, including both prose and poetry) with a grade of at least B–. Students whose field is Greek and Roman History and Material Culture may only choose to satisfy this requirement by:

      • completing either the Greek or the Latin qualifying examination with a grade of at least B– and by completing one language course in the other language with a grade of at least B+, or by

      • earning credit for the relative 1000H Advanced Language Studies course.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S);
9 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework-only



Master of Arts

MA Program (Two-Year)
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S); 9 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

MA Program (One-Year Advanced-Standing Option)
Program Length: 3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S); 9 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

 

Classics
Classics: Classics MA, PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please consult the department for course offerings.

Course Code Course Title
AMP2000Y0 Collaborative Specialization in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (CSAMP) Proseminar
CLA2000Y Graduate Research Paper
CLA3020H Research Methods in Ancient History
CLA4000Y0 Major Field
GRK1000H
Advanced Studies in Greek Language (Credit/No Credit)
GRK1800H
Special Topics in Greek Literature
GRK1801H
Special Topics in Greek History
GRK1810H
Classical Greek Literature and Culture
GRK1811H
Hellenistic Literature and Culture
GRK2505Y0
Greek Sight Exam
JCO5121H Classics and Theory
LAT1000H
Advanced Studies in Latin Language (Credit/No Credit)
LAT1800H
Special Topics in Latin Literature
LAT1801H
Special Topics in Roman History
LAT1806H
Readings in the Roman Historians
LAT1809H
Readings in Roman Republican Literature and Culture
LAT1810H
Readings in Roman Imperial Literature and Culture
LAT2505Y0
Latin Sight Exam
SRD4444Y0
Ancient History Seminar/Literature Seminar

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

Research Seminars

The following courses are open to students in other departments with the permission of the instructor and the Department of Classics. See the departmental brochure or website for language requirements. Not all courses are offered every year. See the departmental brochure or website for course offerings in the current year.

Course Code Course Title
CLA5000H
Early Greek Epic
CLA5004H
Studies in Greek Poetry
CLA5007H
Criticism of Latin Poetry
CLA5009H
Literature of the Roman Republic
CLA5010H
Virgil
CLA5012H
Studies in Ancient Philosophy I
CLA5013H
Studies in Ancient Science
CLA5015H
Latin Poetry of the Empire
CLA5016H
Topics in Greek and Hellenistic History
CLA5018H
Topics in Roman History
CLA5020H
Studies in Ancient Philosophy II
CLA5021H
Topics in the Study of Greek and Hellenistic Literature and Culture
CLA5022H
Topics in the Study of Greek and Hellenistic Society
CLA5023H
Topics in the Study of Roman Literature and Culture
CLA5024H
Topics in the Study of Roman Society
CLA5025H
Topics in Greek and Hellenistic History II
CLA5026H
Topics in Graeco-Roman Historiography I
CLA5028H
Topics in Graeco-Roman History I
CLA5029H
Topics in Graeco-Roman History II
JMT1000H
Andronicus of Rhodes and the Early Peripatos
JMT1002H
Augustine: Soliloquia

Directed Reading

Course Code Course Title
CLA1300Y
Studies in Classical Antiquity
CLA1301H
Studies in Classical Antiquity
CLA1303H
Studies in Classical Antiquity
CLA1306H
Studies in Greek Literature I
CLA1308H
Studies in Latin Literature I
Classics
Classics: Classics PhD

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Classics' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Successful completion of a strong master's program in classics or a related field (with at least a B+ average overall and at least one A–). All students must have the equivalent of at least four years of training in either Latin or Greek and at least three years in the other language, and a broad preparation in the reading of ancient texts in the original languages.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Satisfactory completion of:

    • GRK1000H (0.5 FCE) or equivalent

    • LAT1000H (0.5 FCE) or equivalent.

  • At the department's discretion, students who need additional preparation may be required to take a selection of courses approved by the department during Year 1 before beginning to prepare for the qualifying examinations. Students will be notified of such additional requirements at the time of their offers of admission or early in their first session.

    • CLA2000Y (1.0 FCE) Graduate Research Paper with a grade of at least A–. Doctoral students who complete the Graduate Research Paper at a lower standard which nevertheless satisfies the MA requirement will be granted the MA. Students admitted with advanced standing are exempt from the Graduate Research Paper.

    • 10 seminars with an A– average, including at least two outside the student’s field of specialization (one of which must not be offered or cross-listed by the Department of Classics).

    • Satisfactory participation for at least two years in the seminar series for the student’s field (SRD4444Y0 or AMP2000Y).

  • Qualifying exam. Completion of the Greek qualifying examination and Latin qualifying examination with grades of at least B+. One of these exams must be passed by the end of Year 2, and both must be passed by the end of Year 3 of the PhD. Doctoral students who complete the qualifying examinations at a lower standard which nevertheless satisfies the MA requirement will be granted the MA.

  • Satisfactory completion of sight translation examinations in both Greek and Latin with grades of at least B+. This requirement must be completed before the major field examination is attempted. Students whose field is Greek and Roman History may satisfy this requirement with a grade of at least B+ on the sight translation examination in one language and a grade of at least B on the sight translation examination in the other language.

  • Demonstration of adequate reading knowledge of two languages of research other than English, one of which will normally be German, before the major field examination is attempted.

  • Satisfactory completion of the major field examination (CLA4000Y0). The major field defines a broad area of specialization, within which the dissertation topic will fall. It is normally established by Year 3 of the program and is directed by the supervisory committee. Preparation for the major field examination includes the completion of a satisfactory research essay. The major field is examined by means of two written examinations, one of which must involve translation from the list of primary sources, and an oral examination covering the research essay and the examination papers. The major field examination should be completed by the middle of Year 4.

  • The dissertation should be completed by the end of Year 5.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

6 years

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

 

PhD Program (Advanced-Standing)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Classics' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants are admitted with advanced standing if they have successfully completed a strong master's program in Classics. Students who have completed the MA program in Classics at the University of Toronto are required to have grades of at least B+ in all graded coursework and a grade of at least A– on the Graduate Research Paper CLA2000Y.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Satisfactory completion of:

    • GRK1000H (0.5 FCE) or equivalent

    • LAT1000H (0.5 FCE) or equivalent.

  • 10 seminars with an A– average, including at least two outside the student’s field of specialization (one of which must not be offered or cross-listed by the Department of Classics). Students who have completed CLA2000Y with a grade of at least A– for their MA degree, or who have a comparable achievement, need 8 seminars with an A– average.

  • Satisfactory participation for at least two years in the seminar series for the student’s field (SRD4444Y0 or AMP2000Y). This includes the Ancient History methods course for those students whose field is Greek and Roman History and Material Culture.

  • Qualifying exams.

    • Completion of the Greek qualifying examination and Latin qualifying examination with grades of at least B+. Students whose field is Greek and Roman History and Material Culture may choose to complete either the Greek qualifying examination or the Latin qualifying examination with a grade of B+ based on the MA reading list instead of the PhD reading list. Students in this field who are enrolled in the Mediterranean Archaeology collaborative specialization (MACS) may choose to satisfy the other language examination by passing an 1800H-level language course in that language with a B+. One of these exams must be passed by the end of Year 2, and both must be passed by the end of Year 3 of the four-year PhD program, but passing the exams at an earlier stage is advisable. Doctoral students who complete the qualifying examinations at a lower standard which nevertheless satisfies the MA requirement will be granted the MA.

    • Completion of the respective Area examination with a grade of at least B+ for students whose field is Greek and Roman Literature or Greek and Roman History and Material Culture.

  • Satisfactory completion of sight translation examinations in both Greek and Latin with grades of at least B+. This requirement must be completed before the major field examination is attempted. Students whose field is Greek and Roman History and Material Culture may satisfy this requirement with a grade of at least B+ on the sight translation examination in one language and a grade of at least B– on the sight translation examination in the other language. Students in this field who are enrolled in the Mediterranean Archaeology collaborative specialization (MACS) may choose to satisfy the other language examination by passing an 1800H-level language course in the other language with a B+.

  • Demonstration of adequate reading knowledge of two languages of research other than English, one of which will normally be German, before the major field examination is attempted.

  • Satisfactory completion of the major field examination (CLA4000Y0). The major field defines a broad area of specialization, within which the dissertation topic will fall. It is normally established by Year 2 of the four-year PhD program and is directed by the supervisory committee. Preparation for the major field examination includes the completion of a satisfactory research essay. The major field is examined by means of two written examinations, one of which may involve translation from the list of primary sources, and an oral examination covering the research essay and the examination papers. The major field examination should be completed by the middle of Year 3 of the four-year PhD program.

  • The dissertation should be completed by the end of Year 4.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Classics' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Successful completion of a strong bachelor's program in classics of a related field with at least an A– average in the final year. For students who expect to focus on the areas of Greek and Roman Literature or Ancient Philosophy, at least three years of study in both Greek and Latin and a broad preparation in the reading of ancient texts in the original languages is recommended. For applicants who expect to focus on the area of Greek and Roman History and Material Culture, the equivalent of three years of training in either Greek or Latin, familiarity with the other language, and demonstrated excellence in the study of Greek and Roman history and material culture is required.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Satisfactory completion of:

    • GRK1000H (0.5 FCE) or equivalent

    • LAT1000H (0.5 FCE) or equivalent.

  • 10 seminars with an A– average, including at least two outside the student’s field of specialization (one of which must not be offered or cross-listed by the Department of Classics).

  • With permission of the Graduate Coordinator, two of the seminars in Year 1 may be exchanged for CLA2000Y (1.0 FCE) Graduate Research Paper. A grade of A– is required for completion. Doctoral students who complete the Graduate Research Paper at a lower standard which nevertheless satisfies the MA requirement will be granted the MA.

  • Satisfactory participation for at least two years in the seminar series for the student’s field (SRD4444Y0 or AMP2000Y). This includes the Ancient History methods course for those students whose field is Greek and Roman History and Material Culture.

  • Qualifying exams.

    • Completion of the Greek qualifying examination and Latin qualifying examination with grades of at least B+. Students in the Greek and Roman History and Material Culture field may choose to complete either the Greek qualifying examination or the Latin qualifying examination with a grade of B+ based on the MA reading list instead of the PhD reading list. Students in this field who are enrolled in the Mediterranean Archaeology collaborative specialization (MACS) may choose to satisfy the other language examination by passing an 1800H-level language course in that language with a B+. One of these exams must be passed by the end of Year 2, and both must be passed by the end of Year 3 of the five-year PhD program. Doctoral students who complete the qualifying examinations at a lower standard which nevertheless satisfies the MA requirement will be granted the MA.

    • Completion of the respective Area examination with a grade of at least B+ for students whose field is Greek and Roman Literature or Greek and Roman History and Material Culture.

  • Satisfactory completion of sight translation examinations in both Greek and Latin with grades of at least B+. This requirement must be completed before the major field examination is attempted. Students whose field is Greek and Roman History and Material Culture may satisfy this requirement with a grade of at least B+ on the sight translation examination in one language and a grade of at least B– on the sight translation examination in the other language. Students in this area of emphasis who are enrolled in the Mediterranean Archaeology collaborative specialization (MACS) may choose to satisfy the other language examination by passing an 1800H-level language course in that language with a B+.

  • Demonstration of adequate reading knowledge of two languages of research other than English, one of which will normally be German, before the major field examination is attempted.

  • Satisfactory completion of the major field examination (CLA4000Y0). The major field defines a broad area of specialization, within which the dissertation topic will fall. It is normally established by Year 3 of the program and is directed by the supervisory committee. Preparation for the major field examination includes the completion of a satisfactory research essay. The major field is examined by means of two written examinations, one of which may involve translation from the list of primary sources, and an oral examination covering the research essay and the examination papers. The major field examination should be completed by the middle of Year 4.

  • The dissertation should be completed by the end of Year 5.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

0 Course that may continue over a program. The course is graded when completed.

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Advanced-Standing)
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

Classics
Community Development: Courses

Core Course

Course Code Course Title
UCS1000H
Community Development

In addition to the core course (UCS1000H), students must take an additional 1.0 FCE in the subject area of the collaborative specialization, to be approved by the collaborative specialization director. The following is a list of the currently approved courses; the list is reviewed annually and posted on the Community Development website.

Adult Education

Course Code Course Title
LHA1102H
Introduction to Community Development
LHA1104H
Social Action Education: Community Development, Social Services, and Social Movements
LHA1182H
Nonprofits, Co-operatives, and the Social Economy: An Overview
LHA1190H
Community Healing and Peacebuilding
LHA1194H
Cyberliteracy and Adult Education
LHA1196H
Walking Together, Talking Together: The Praxis of Reconciliation
LHA5100H
Special Topics in Adult Education and Community Development: Master's Level (with approval of the Director)
LHA6100H
Special Topics in Adult Education and Community Development: Doctoral Level (with approval of the Director)

Counselling Psychology

Course Code Course Title
APD1290H
Indigenous Healing in Counselling and Psychoeducation

Nursing

Course Code Course Title
NUR1047Y
Community Participation and Health
NUR1083H
Comparative Politics of Health Policy in a Globalizing World

Planning

Course Code Course Title
JPG1507H
Housing Markets and Housing Policy Analysis
JPG1512H
Place, Politics, and the Urban
JPG1518H
Sustainability and Urban Communities
JPG1615H
Planning the Social Economy
JPG1812Y
Planning for Change: Community Development in Practice

Public Health Sciences

Course Code Course Title
CHL5126H
Building Community Resilience
CHL7001H
Directed Reading

Social Work

Course Code Course Title
SWK4210H
Promoting Empowerment: Working at the Margins
SWK4304H
Globalization and Transnationalism: Intersections of Policy and Community Practice Locally and Globally
SWK4306H
Theoretical Approaches to Defining Social Injustice and Engaging in Social Change
SWK4422H
Social Housing and Homelessness
SWK4512H
Research Knowledge for Social Justice
Community Development (Collaborative Specialization)
Community Development: Master's Level

Admission Requirements

  • Collaborative specializations are administered under the auspices of the School of Graduate Studies.

  • Applicants must be accepted for admission to a participating graduate unit and comply with the admission procedures of that unit before applying to the Collaborative Specialization in Community Development.

  • Applicants must submit the following to the collaborative specialization committee:

    • A copy of the letter accepting you into one of the participating graduate units.

    • A resumé or curriculum vitae (CV).

    • A letter explaining how your plan of study, your specific interests, and your career goals relate to community development (i.e., why you want to enrol in the Collaborative Specialization in Community Development); maximum length: 500 words. Include reference to any relevant experience (volunteer, work, education, etc.).

Specialization Requirements

  • Students must register in the master's degree program through one of the participating home graduate units. They must meet all respective degree requirements of the School of Graduate Studies and their participating home graduate unit.

  • To fulfil the requirements of the Collaborative Specialization in Community Development, students must complete the following:

    • The core course UCS1000H Community Development.

    • An additional 1.0 full-course equivalent (FCE) in the subject area of the collaborative specialization, to be approved by the collaborative specialization director, of which at least 0.5 FCE must be external to the student's home graduate unit.

    • Participation in a non-credit coordinating seminar on community development.

    • Where required by the home degree program, a thesis or the major research paper (as designated by the home degree program) on a topic related to community development; a member of the thesis committee or the reader of the major research paper must be a faculty member associated with the collaborative specialization. Or where required by the home degree program, a practicum placement with community development content as approved by the collaborative specialization director or core faculty member from that home degree program.

  • Normally, the required courses listed below are taken as options within regular departmental or faculty degree requirements, not as additional courses.

Community Development (Collaborative Specialization)
Comparative Literature: Comparative Literature MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

The Comparative Literature MA program is a course-based program that accommodates a diverse range of students’ interests. The interdisciplinary and transnational character of the program is reflected in the fact that students may take up to half their courses in other departments of their choice. Students work in languages other than English, and their study may include work in a non-literary discipline. The COL1000H Faculty Seminar provides a basis for study in the program. All incoming students take this seminar course where they consider core theoretical problems of comparison.

All incoming students meet with the Associate Director to discuss their program and to decide on their course of study before beginning classes.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies, provided that applicants also satisfy the Centre for Comparative Literature's requirements stated below. In all cases, programs of study must be approved by the centre.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university that includes courses in literature and languages with an average grade equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+ in the applicant's overall program.

  • Demonstrated experience in the study of two literatures (or in comparative literature and one national literature) at the undergraduate level and an ability to work at the graduate level in at least one language other than English.

  • All applicants must register as full-time students.

Program Requirements

  • Students admitted to the MA must successfully complete at least 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • COL1000H Faculty Seminar (0.5 FCE)

    • at least 1.5 FCEs in COL courses.

  • Students may pursue independent research for credit equivalent to 0.5 FCE at the MA level, under the direction of an advisor approved by the Centre for Comparative Literature.

  • A plan of study is defined by each MA student through consultation with the Associate Director in light of the student's particular areas of interest and background. This plan of study is subject to the approval of the Centre for Comparative Literature. In addition to the numerous courses in literary theory, methodology, and interdisciplinary topics offered by the centre, courses may also be selected from departments of language and literature, as well as from other units in the humanities.

  • Average of at least B+ in coursework.

  • MA students who intend to pursue doctoral studies are strongly advised to make appropriate plans for the acquisition of graduate level competence in a second language and literature other than English. An adequate reading knowledge of this second language must be demonstrated before the MA is received.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework-only



Master of Arts
Program Length: 3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time


 

Comparative Literature
Comparative Literature: Comparative Literature MA, PhD Courses

Students should consult the Comparative Literature website for the list of currently offered courses.

Course Code Course Title
COL1000H
Faculty Seminar
COL1900H Reading and Research for the MA
COL2100H
Special Topics Course
COL4000Y Practicum on Research and Bibliography in Comparative Literature
COL5012H How Aesthetics was Made a Science: Readings in Czech and Russian
COL5016H Dramatic Text and Theoretical Communication: Bertolt Brecht, Robert Lepage, and Robert Wilson
COL5018H Gender and Agency
COL5027H Memory, Trauma, and History
COL5032H Feminist Approaches to Medieval Literature
COL5033H Visual Portraitures in Contemporary Autobiographical Narratives
COL5037H Magic Prague: Questions of Literary Cityspaces
COL5047H
The Two Avant-Gardes
COL5072H Affinities: Readings of Realism and Radicalism
COL5081H Benjamin’s Arcades Project
COL5086H Literature, Culture, and Contact in Medieval Iberia
COL5094H Forms of Critical Writing
COL5095H Giorgio Agamben: Exception and Potentiality
COL5096H
The Problem of Translation: Historical, Theoretical, and Pragmatic Perspectives
COL5101H Diasporic Cities: Itinerant Narratives of Metropoles by Travellers and Expatriates
COL5109H Jean-Luc Nancy: Retreating the Aesthetic
COL5110H
Post-Capitalist Fantasy: Culture, Politics, Subjectivity
COL5111H Revenge, Resistance, Race, and Law
COL5117H Freud and Psychoanalysis
COL5118H Sovereignty: Hobbes and his 21st-Century Successors
COL5122H Text and Digital Media
COL5123H Converting to Digital Humanities
COL5124H Public Reading: Literature and the Formation of Critical Publics
COL5125H Literature, Trauma, Modernity
COL5126H
Sports Narrated: Literary and Interdisciplinary Explorations
COL5127H Queer Ethics and Aesthetics of Existence
COL5128H Tragedy: Instantiations of a Dramatic Form in Theatre, Philosophy, Opera, and Popular Cinema
COL5129H New Addictions for the Anthropocene
COL5130H
Comparison and "the Human"
COL5131H Non Disclosure Acts
COL5132H One Philosopher and One Artist: Towards a New Practice of Comparison
COL5133H Comparative Modernisms
COL5135H
Climate Genres
COL5136H
Aesthetics of Space, Place, and Power
COL5137H Paraliterary Practices and Dialogic Creativity
COL5138H
Dramaturgy of the Dialectic
COL5139H
Critical Race Theory
COL5140H Beckett and Philosophy
COL5141H Beyond the Anthropocene: New Directions in Environmental Humanities
COL5143H Dramaturgies of the Dialectic Part I: Hegel: The End of Art and the Endgame of Theater
COL5144H Dramaturgies of the Dialectic Part II: Tragedy and Philosophy after Hegel
COL5145H Poetics of Personhood
COL5142H Women and Sex and Talk
COL5146H Written in Blood: Caribbean Readings in Conflict and Healing
COL5147H Books at Risk
COL5148H Post-Conflict Literatures: Europe, Africa, and the Americas
JCD5135H Race, Politics, and Jewishness
JCD5136H Migration and Memory: Narratives of Jewish Exile and Displacement
JCO5121H Classics and Theory Seminar
JFC5025H
Feminism and Postmodernism: Theory and Practice
JFC5105H
Collections of Knowledge: Encyclopedism and Travel Literature in Early Modern Europe (1500–1800)
JFC5129H
Performative Autobiographical Acts: Painted and Photographic Representations of Self in Personal and Political Testimonials
JFC5136H Allegory and Allegorism in Literature and Fine Arts
JGC1855H
Critical Theory in Context: The French-German Connection
JHL1282H
Comparative Totalitarian Culture
JHL1680H
Revolutionary Women’s Cultures in East Asia, Early to Mid 20th Century
JLE5225H
The Passage from History to Fiction
JLV5134H
Theories of the Novel
JOS5019H
Cervantes and Renaissance Humanism
JOS5029H Reading Cervantes
Comparative Literature
Comparative Literature: Comparative Literature PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The Comparative Literature PhD program accommodates a diverse range of students’ interests united by a shared concern for comparative issues. The interdisciplinary and transnational character of the program is reflected in the fact that students may take up to approximately half their courses in other departments of their choice. Students work in at least two languages other than English, and their study may include work in a non-literary discipline.

All incoming students meet with the Associate Director to discuss their program and to decide on their course of study before beginning classes.

The Centre for Comparative Literature only provides supervision in areas which fall within the competency, interests, or availability of its graduate faculty. The Centre supports research which engages creative practice with humanities-based theory and scholarship. Prospective students with an existing creative practice who are interested in using research creation methods are encouraged to contact the Associate Director to discuss the varieties of projects that can be supported. Fields of research creation may include, but are not limited to: architecture, design, creative writing, visual arts, performance, film, video, interdisciplinary arts, media and electronic arts, and new artistic practices (including experiments with the hard and social sciences). The Centre does not provide studio space or production facilities.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies, provided that applicants also satisfy the Centre for Comparative Literature's requirements stated below. In all cases, programs of study must be approved by the Centre.

  • An appropriate master's degree with an average grade of at least A–. Normally, the master's degree will be in comparative literature; however, students with a master's degree in a humanities discipline involving literary studies, especially specific language and literature programs, will also be considered. Demonstrated ability to do advanced research in two languages and literatures other than English.

  • Applicants, including those from the University of Toronto, must arrange for recommendations from two referees; must submit a statement of purpose of approximately 500 words; and must submit a sample of written work, preferably a short essay on a literary topic.

  • The Centre welcomes applications from people with an established creative practice who would like to incorporate creative research methodologies into their dissertation work. Applicants who are interested in doing so must have the required expertise and resources to carry out the proposed creative work. Their letter of intent must 1) describe the type of creative research practice they intend to pursue so the Centre can determine whether it can provide appropriate supervisory and committee support. The applicant must 2) direct at least one reference letter writer to testify to the applicant’s competency in the relevant creative practice, and the applicant must 3) articulate how the creative practice may be employed as a method for elucidating critical questions animating the dissertation project.

Program Requirements

  • A student with an MA in Comparative Literature or its equivalent must take at least 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs), of which a minimum of 2.0 FCEs must be COL courses. A student who has an MA in a humanities discipline involving literary studies, especially specific language and literature programs, may be required to take more courses. The actual number of courses required for the PhD will be established at the time of admission through consultation with the Director/Associate Director.

  • Students may pursue independent research for credit equivalent to 0.5 FCE at the PhD level, under the direction of an advisor approved by the Centre.

  • Students define the scope and approach of their plan of study in consultation with the Associate Director and other faculty. During the first two years of the program, students complete coursework, language requirements, and prepare for the field examination. Coursework must be completed within the first two years of the PhD program. Students constitute a field examination/ supervisory committee and submit a dissertation proposal no later than the end of Year 2 of PhD study. The field examination is taken ideally no later than the end of the first session of Year 3.

  • Students must demonstrate an ability to work at the graduate level in two languages and literatures other than English. An adequate reading knowledge of a third language other than English must be demonstrated before taking the field examination. For this last requirement, it is possible to substitute competency in a non-literary discipline. The Centre reserves the right to determine whether a student has met this requirement. Typically, it will be two graduate half courses. Certification of graduate-level competence and reading knowledge in languages is given to all students who qualify.

  • All PhD students are required to take their field examination by the end of the Spring session of Year 3 of the program. The examination consists of both a field paper and an oral component.

    • The field paper is a 30-page critical essay based on the candidate’s reading list that assesses the current state of research and delineates issues and questions pertinent to the thesis. The field paper must be submitted two to three weeks prior to the oral field exam.

    • The oral part of the examination begins with a textual explication by the student, no more than 30 minutes in length, of a specific passage or poem from a work in the primary reading list, assigned for preparation at least three days in advance. For the presentation, only notes or a general outline may be used. The rest of the examination usually consists of questions concerning the student's commentary on the text, the written field paper, the reading list of the original field proposal, and/or other aspects of the field. The oral exam lasts for two hours.

  • In the event of failure, the student will be given one more chance to take the exam within one year. Failure after two attempts will lead to the termination of the student's registration.

  • When the field examination has been completed successfully, the candidate will prepare and defend a dissertation which must be an original and significant contribution to the existing body of knowledge. This dissertation may include a creative research component.

  • Students' progress will be assessed at least once a year by the Centre's Graduate Academic Committee and/or their respective supervisory committees. Although the program has been designed for completion in four years, some students may require a longer period to complete all of the requirements.

  • The student must be geographically available, visit the campus regularly, and must register as a full-time student. In addition, a full-time student is not permitted to be absent from the University for an extended period or to participate in a program offered by another university without the explicit written permission of the Centre for Comparative Literature.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies, provided that applicants also satisfy the Centre for Comparative Literature's requirements stated below. In all cases, programs of study must be approved by the Centre.

  • Students coming directly out of an appropriate undergraduate program (direct-entry) who have a demonstrated, exceptional ability to undertake advanced research in two languages and literatures other than English may be considered for direct admission into the PhD program.

  • Applicants, including those from the University of Toronto, must arrange for recommendations from two referees; must submit a letter of intent not exceeding 500 words; and must submit a sample of written work, preferably a short essay on a literary topic.

  • The Centre welcomes applications from people with an established creative practice who would like to incorporate creative research methodologies into their dissertation work. Applicants who are interested in doing so must have the required expertise and resources to carry out the proposed creative work. Their letter of intent must 1) describe the type of creative research practice they intend to pursue so the Centre can determine whether it can provide appropriate supervisory and committee support. The applicant must 2) direct at least one reference letter writer to testify to the applicant’s competency in the relevant creative practice, and the applicant must 3) articulate how the creative practice may be employed as a method for elucidating critical questions animating the dissertation project.

Program Requirements

  • A student with a bachelor's degree who is admitted directly to the PhD program must take at least 6.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs), of which 3.0 must be COL courses. The actual number of courses required for the PhD will be established at the time of admission through consultation with the Director/Associate Director.

  • Students may pursue independent research for credit equivalent to 0.5 FCE at the PhD level, under the direction of an advisor approved by the Centre.

  • Students define the scope and approach of their plan of study in consultation with the Associate Director and other faculty. During the first two years of the program, students complete coursework, language requirements, and prepare for the field examination. Coursework must be completed within the first two years of the PhD program. Students constitute a field examination/ supervisory committee and submit a dissertation proposal no later than the end of Year 2 of PhD study. The field examination is taken ideally no later than the end of the first session of Year 3.

  • Students must demonstrate an ability to work at the graduate level in two languages and literatures other than English. An adequate reading knowledge of a third language other than English must be demonstrated before taking the field examination. For this last requirement, it is possible to substitute competency in a non-literary discipline. The Centre reserves the right to determine whether a student has met this requirement. Typically, it will be two graduate half courses. Certification of graduate-level competence and reading knowledge in languages is given to all students who qualify.

  • All PhD students are required to take their field examination by the end of the Spring session of Year 3 of the program. The examination consists of both a field paper and an oral component.

    • The field paper is a 30-page critical essay based on the candidate’s reading list that assesses the current state of research and delineates issues and questions pertinent to the thesis. The field paper must be submitted two to three weeks prior to the oral field exam.

    • The oral part of the examination begins with a textual explication by the student, no more than 30 minutes in length, of a specific passage or poem from a work in the primary reading list, assigned for preparation at least three days in advance. For the presentation, only notes or a general outline may be used. The rest of the examination usually consists of questions concerning the student's commentary on the text, the written field paper, the reading list of the original field proposal, and/or other aspects of the field. The oral exam lasts for two hours.

  • In the event of failure, the student will be given one more chance to take the exam within one year. Failure after two attempts will lead to the termination of the student's registration.

  • When the field examination has been completed successfully, the candidate will prepare and defend a dissertation which must be an original and significant contribution to the existing body of knowledge. This dissertation may include a creative research component.

  • Students' progress will be assessed at least once a year by the Centre's Graduate Academic Committee and/or their respective supervisory committees.

  • The student must be geographically available, visit the campus regularly, and must register as a full-time student. In addition, a full-time student is not permitted to be absent from the University for an extended period or to participate in a program offered by another university without the explicit written permission of the Centre for Comparative Literature.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

Comparative Literature
Comparative, International and Development Education: Courses

Not all courses are offered each year. Visit the Comparative, International, and Development Education (CIDE) website for current course offerings, including special topics courses that do not appear in the list below.

In addition to the courses listed here, a defined list of special topics courses, taught by CIDE participating faculty members in any of the participating graduate departments, can be taken to meet core or elective graduate course requirements for CIDE.

Core Courses

Comparative Education

Course Code Course Title
CIE1001H
Introduction to Comparative, International, and Development Education
CIE1002H
Practicum for Comparative, International, and Development Education
CIE1006H
Transnational Perspectives on Democracy, Human Rights, and Democratic Education in an Era of Globalization
CIE6000H
Special Topics in Comparative, International, and Development Education

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning

Curriculum and Pedagogy Program
Course Code Course Title
CTL1037H
Teacher Development: Comparative and Cross-Cultural Perspectives
CTL1060H
Education and Social Development
CTL1312H
Democratic Citizenship Education: Comparative International Perspectives
CTL1319H
Religious Education: Comparative and International Perspectives
CTL1330H
Education and Peacebuilding in Conflict Zones: International Comparative Perspectives

Leadership, Higher and Adult Education

Adult Education and Community Development Program
Course Code Course Title
LHA1146H
Women, War, and Learning
LHA3064H Global Governance and Educational Change: The Politics of International Cooperation in Education
Educational Leadership and Policy Program
Course Code Course Title
LHA1065H
Educational Equity and Excellence in International Comparison
LHA1066H
Comparative and International Perspectives on Gender and Education Policy and Practice
Higher Education Program
Course Code Course Title
LHA1806H
Systems of Higher Education
LHA1807H
System-Wide Planning and Policy for Higher Education
LHA1825H
Comparative Education Theory and Methodology (RM)
LHA1826H
Comparative Higher Education
LHA1846H
Internationalization of Higher Education in a Comparative Perspective
LHA3810H
International Academic Relations

Social Justice Education

Course Code Course Title
SJE1924H
Modernization, Development, and Education in African Contexts
SJE1976H
Critical Media Literacy Education
SJE3911H
Cultural Knowledges, Representation, and Colonial Education

Elective Courses

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning

Curriculum and Pedagogy Program
Course Code Course Title
CTL1031H
Language, Culture, and Identity: Using the Literary Text in Teacher Development
CTL1063H
Pedagogies of Solidarity
CTL1218H Culture and Cognition in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education
CTL1221H
Education for Human Goals Local and Global: How’s Science Education Helping?
CTL1307H
Identity Construction and Education of Minorities
CTL1318H
Teaching Conflict and Conflict Resolution
CTL1320H
Introduction to Aboriginal Land-Centered Education: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
CTL1321H
Aboriginal Civilization: Language, Culture, and Identity
CTL1332H Introduction to Decolonization in Education
CTL1406H
The Origins of Modern Schooling: Issues in the Development of the North American Educational System
CTL1430H
Gendered Colonialisms, Imperialisms, and Nationalisms in History
Language and Literacies Education Program
Course Code Course Title
CTL3000H
Foundations of Bilingual and Multicultural Education
CTL3008H
Critical Pedagogy, Language, and Cultural Diversity
CTL3011H
Cognitive Sociolinguistic and Sociopolitical Orientations in Bilingual Education Research
CTL3015H
Language and Literacies Education in Multilingual Contexts
CTL3018H
Language Planning and Policy
CTL3024H
Language Teacher Education
CTL3025H
Educational Sociolinguistics
CTL3026H
Pragmatics in Language Education
CTL3031H
Children's Literature Within a Multicultural Context
CTL3100H Communication and Second Language Learning in the Workplace
CTL3805H
Multilingualism and Pluralism
CTL3811H Critical Perspectives on Language, Racism, and Settler-Colonialism
(Exclusion: CTL6301H.)

Leadership, Higher and Adult Education

Adult Education and Community Development Program
Course Code Course Title
LHA1102H
Introduction to Community Development
LHA1113H Gender and Race at Work
LHA1115H
Learning for the Global Economy
LHA1142H
Young Adulthood in Crisis: Learning, Transitions, and Activism
LHA1147H
Women, Migration, and Work
LHA1180H
Indigenous Worldviews: Implications for Education
LHA1181H
Embodied Learning and Alternative Approaches to Community Wellness
LHA1184H
Aboriginal Knowledge: Implications for Education
LHA1190H
Community Healing and Peacebuilding
LHA1196H
Walking Together, Talking Together: The Praxis of Reconciliation
Educational Leadership and Policy Program
Course Code Course Title
LHA1029H
Special Applications of the Administrative Process
LHA1041H Educational Administration II: Social and Policy Context of Schooling
LHA3041H Administrative Theory and Educational Problems II: Doctoral Seminar on Policy Issues in Education
LHA3055H Democratic Values, Student Engagement, and Democratic Leadership
Higher Education Program
Course Code Course Title
LHA1814H
Lifelong Learning and Professional and Vocational Education
(Exclusion: LHA5807H Special Topics in Higher Education: Master's Level.)

Social Justice Education

Course Code Course Title
SJE1912H
Foucault and Research in Education and Culture: Discourse, Power, and the Subject
SJE1921Y
The Principles of Anti-Racism Education
SJE1922H
Sociology of Race and Ethnicity
SJE1925H
Indigenous Knowledge and Decolonization: Pedagogical Implications
SJE1926H
Race, Space, and Citizenship: Research Methods
SJE1951H The School and the Community
SJE1956H
Social Relations of Cultural Production in Education
SJE2941H Bourdieu: Theory of Practice in Social Sciences
SJE3905H Interdisciplinary Approaches to Research: Theory and Praxis
SJE3912H
Race and Knowledge Production: Research Methods
SJE3914H
Anti-Colonial Thought and Pedagogical Challenges
SJE3915H
Franz Fanon and Education
SJE3933H
Globalisation and Transnationality: Feminist Perspectives
Comparative, International and Development Education (Collaborative Specialization)
Comparative, International and Development Education: Doctoral Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants who wish to enrol in the collaborative specialization must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and a graduate degree program in one of the collaborating graduate units. Applicants should apply to the appropriate degree program in one (or more) of the collaborating graduate units that corresponds most closely to their general background and interests.

  • Applicants to the CIDE collaborative specialization are normally expected to have had at least one year of international or cross-cultural experience (includes Indigenous nation settings).

  • Applicants who have questions concerning their eligibility should contact the CIDEC administrator.

  • Prospective applicants should review the detailed information about the CIDE collaborative specialization. They are strongly advised to contact one of the participating CIDE faculty members in their home graduate unit to discuss their research interests and goals.

Specialization Requirements

  • Individual student programs of study must meet the requirements of both the home graduate unit and the collaborative specialization. Normally, a careful selection of cross-listed courses will satisfy this requirement without any additional course load.

  • Course requirements are as follows:

    • 0.5 full-course equivalent (FCE) required introduction: CIE1001H Introduction to Comparative, International and Development Education, if not already taken, or equivalent if transferring from another university. CIE1001H must be taken in Year 1 of the full-time student's academic course load, or within the first four courses of the part-time and flexible-time student's academic work. Students who have completed CIE1001H at the master's level must select (in lieu, in addition to the requirements below) a 0.5 FCE course from the list of core courses, with approval from the CIDE Specialization Director at the time of course selection.

    • 0.5 FCE core CIDE graduate (preferably doctoral-level) course.

    • 1.0 FCE (equivalent to two half courses) additional core CIDE or elective graduate (preferably doctoral-level) courses. CIDE courses must be taught by CIDE affiliated graduate faculty members.

  • Regular participation in and contribution to the CIDE Seminar Series (at least one major presentation to the seminar group related to the student's thesis research/development work in addition to regular participation). Participation at a minimum of five seminars is required; some may be attended live online.

  • Completion of a thesis that contributes to the research/theory base of CIDE. Participating CIDE faculty and the home graduate unit must be represented on the thesis committee.

Comparative, International and Development Education (Collaborative Specialization)
Comparative, International and Development Education: Master's Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants who wish to enrol in the collaborative specialization must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and a graduate degree program in one of the collaborating graduate units. Applicants should apply to the appropriate degree program in one (or more) of the collaborating graduate units that corresponds most closely to their general background and interests.

  • Applicants to the CIDE collaborative specialization are normally expected to have had at least one year of international or cross-cultural experience (includes Indigenous nation settings).

  • Applicants who have questions concerning their eligibility should contact the CIDEC administrator.

  • Prospective applicants should review the detailed information about the CIDE collaborative specialization.

Specialization Requirements

  • Individual student programs of study must meet the requirements of both the home graduate unit and the collaborative specialization. Normally, a careful selection of cross-listed courses will satisfy this requirement without any additional course load.

  • Course requirements are as follows:

    • 0.5 full-course equivalent (FCE) required introduction: CIE1001H Introduction to Comparative, International and Development Education. CIE1001H must be taken in Year 1 of the full-time student's academic course load, or within the first four courses of the part-time and flexible-time student's academic work.

    • 0.5 core FCE CIDE graduate course.

    • 1.0 FCE (equivalent to two half courses) other core CIDE or elective graduate courses. CIDE courses must be taught by CIDE affiliated graduate faculty members.

  • Regular participation in and attendance at the CIDE Seminar Series. Participation at a minimum of five seminars is required; some may be attended live online.

  • Students who write a thesis or major research paper as part of their program are also required to make at least one presentation to the CIDE community related to their research/development work.

  • In master's programs requiring a major research paper or a thesis, the topic must relate to and demonstrate master's-level understanding of the research/ theory base of CIDE. Participating CIDE faculty and the home graduate unit must be represented on the thesis committee.

Comparative, International and Development Education (Collaborative Specialization)
Computer Science: Applied Computing MScAC

Master of Science in Applied Computing

Program Description

The Master of Science in Applied Computing (MScAC) program is offered as

  • a general Computer Science program (no concentration) or as

  • a concentration in:

    • Applied Mathematics, offered jointly by the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Mathematics;

    • Artificial Intelligence, offered jointly by the Department of Computer Science, the Department of Statistical Sciences, and the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science;

    • Data Science, offered jointly by the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Statistical Sciences;

    • Quantum Computing, offered jointly by the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Physics.

There is no thesis requirement.

 

MScAC General Program (No Concentration)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Computer Science's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university in computer science or a related discipline.

  • A standing equivalent to at least B+ in the final year of undergraduate studies.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who have graduated from a university where the primary language of instruction is not English must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with the following minimum scores:

    • Internet-based TOEFL: 93/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

    • IELTS: an overall score of 7.0, with at least 6.5 for each component.

  • If students complete a portion of their degree in English, or part of their degree at another university where English is the language of instruction, applicants must still provide proof of English-language proficiency.

  • Three letters of support from faculty and/or employers.

  • Applicants will be asked to respond to program-specific questions addressing their interest in the concentration and objectives for the program.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • 1.0 FCE in required courses: technical communications (CSC2701H) and technical entrepreneurship (CSC2702H).

  • An eight-month industrial internship, CSC2703H (3.5 FCEs). The internship is coordinated by the department and evaluated on a pass/fail basis.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

 

MScAC Program (Applied Mathematics Concentration)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Computer Science's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor’s degree from a recognized university in a related area such as applied mathematics, computational mathematics, computer science, mathematics, physics, statistics, or any discipline where there is a significant mathematical component. The completed bachelor’s degree must include coursework in advanced and multivariate calculus (preferably analysis), linear algebra, and probability. In addition, there should be some depth in at least two of the following six areas:

    • analysis (for example, measure and integration, harmonic analysis, functional analysis);

    • discrete math (for example, algebra, combinatorics, graph theory);

    • foundations (for example, complexity theory, set theory, logic, model theory);

    • geometry and topology;

    • numerical analysis; and

    • ordinary and partial differential equations.

    There should also be a demonstrated capacity at programming and algorithms.

  • A standing equivalent to at least B+ in the final year of undergraduate studies.

  • Applicants must satisfy the admissions committee of their ability to be successful in graduate courses in computer science and mathematics, and in an industrial internship in applied mathematics. Applicants should be able to demonstrate a potential to conduct and communicate applied research at the intersection of computer science, mathematics, and a domain area. Applicants may be asked to do a technical interview as part of the application process.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who have graduated from a university where the primary language of instruction is not English must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with the following minimum scores:

    • Internet-based TOEFL: 93/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

    • IELTS: an overall score of 7.0, with at least 6.5 for each component.

  • If students complete a portion of their degree in English, or part of their degree at another university where English is the language of instruction, applicants must still provide proof of English-language proficiency.

  • Three letters of reference from faculty and/or employers, with preference for at least one such letter from a faculty member in Mathematics or Applied Mathematics.

  • Applicants will be asked to respond to program-specific questions addressing their interest in the concentration and objectives for the program.

  • Applicants must indicate a preference for the concentration in Applied Mathematics in their application. Admission is competitive, and students who are admitted to the MScAc program are not automatically admitted to this concentration upon request.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 1.0 FCE chosen from the MAT1000-level courses or higher.

    • 1.0 FCE chosen from the Computer Science (CSC course designator) graduate course listings.

    • 1.0 FCE in required courses:

      • CSC2701H Communication for Computer Scientists (0.5 FCE) and

      • CSC2702H Technical Entrepreneurship (0.5 FCE).

    • Course selections should be made in consultation with the Program Director.

  • An eight-month industrial internship, CSC2703H (3.5 FCEs). The internship is coordinated by the department and evaluated on a pass/fail basis.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

 

MScAC Program (Artificial Intelligence Concentration)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Computer Science's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor’s degree from a recognized university in a related area such as physics, computer science, mathematics, statistics, engineering, or any discipline where there is a significant quantitative component. The completed bachelor’s degree must include significant exposure to computer science or statistics or engineering including coursework in advanced and multivariate calculus (preferably analysis), linear algebra, probability and statistics, programming languages, and general computational methods.

  • A standing equivalent to at least B+ in the final year of undergraduate studies.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who have graduated from a university where the primary language of instruction is not English must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with the following minimum scores:

    • Internet-based TOEFL: 93/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

    • IELTS: an overall score of 7.0, with at least 6.5 for each component.

  • If students complete a portion of their degree in English, or part of their degree at another university where English is the language of instruction, applicants must still provide proof of English-language proficiency.

  • Three letters of reference from faculty and/or employers, with preference for at least one such letter from a faculty member in Artificial Intelligence (AI).

  • Applicants will be asked to respond to program-specific questions addressing their interest in the concentration and objectives for the program.

  • Applicants must indicate a preference for the concentration in AI in their application. Admission to the AI concentration is competitive. Students who are admitted to the MScAc program are not automatically admitted to the AI concentration upon request.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 1.5 FCEs of coursework in the area of AI:

      • 1.0 FCE selected from the core list of AI courses (see list below) from at least two different research areas

      • 0.5 FCE selected from additional AI courses outside the core list

    • 1.0 FCE in required courses:

      • CSC2701H Communication for Computer Scientists (0.5 FCE)

      • CSC2702H Technical Entrepreneurship (0.5 FCE)

    • Remaining 0.5 FCE of coursework will be chosen from outside of AI:

      • Course selections should be made in consultation with and approved by the Program Director. Appropriate substitutions may be possible with approval.

      • A maximum of 1.0 FCE may be chosen from outside the Computer Science (CSC course designator) graduate course listing.

  • An eight-month industrial internship, CSC2703H (3.5 FCEs). The internship is coordinated by the department and evaluated on a pass/fail basis.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Artificial Intelligence Core Courses

Course Code Course Title
AER1513H State Estimation for Aerospace Vehicles
AER1517H Control for Robotics
CSC2501H Computational Linguistics
CSC2502H Knowledge Representation and Reasoning
CSC2503H Foundations of Computer Vision
CSC2511H Natural Language Computing
CSC2515H* Introduction to Machine Learning (exclusion: ECE1513H)
CSC2516H** Neural Networks and Deep Learning (exclusion: MIE1517H)
CSC2533H Foundations of Knowledge Representation
CSC2630H Introduction to Mobile Robotics
ECE1512H Digital Image Processing and Applications
ECE1513H* Introduction to Machine Learning (exclusion: CSC2515H)
MIE1517H** Introduction to Deep Learning (exclusion: CSC2516H)

*different courses with the same title, offered by different Faculties.
**different courses with similar titles, offered by different Faculties.

 

MScAC Program (Data Science Concentration)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Computer Science's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor’s degree from a recognized university in a related area such as statistics, computer science, mathematics, or any discipline where there is a significant quantitative component.

  • A standing equivalent to at least B+ in the final year of undergraduate studies.

  • Applicants must satisfy the admissions committee of their ability to be successful in graduate courses in computer science, statistics, and an industrial internship in data science. Applicants may be asked to do a technical interview as part of the application process.

  • The program will consider admitting candidates without an undergraduate degree in computer science, statistics, or a related field, but who show a demonstrated aptitude to be an excellent data scientist. Applicants should be able to demonstrate a potential to conduct and communicate applied research at the intersection of computer science, statistics, and a domain area. Background academic preparation to be successful in graduate-level computer science and statistics courses typically, though not always, includes intermediate or advanced undergraduate courses in the following topics:

    • Algorithms and Complexity, Database Systems, or Operating Systems.

    • Statistical Theory/Mathematical Statistics, Probability Theory, or Regression Analysis.

  • Students who are otherwise qualified but lack the appropriate background may be granted conditional admission, pending successful completion of additional background material as judged by the admissions committee.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who have graduated from a university where the primary language of instruction is not English must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with the following minimum scores:

    • Internet-based TOEFL: 93/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

    • IELTS: an overall score of 7.0, with at least 6.5 for each component.

  • If students complete a portion of their degree in English, or part of their degree at another university where English is the language of instruction, applicants must still provide proof of English-language proficiency.

  • Three letters of support from faculty and/or employers.

  • Applicants will be asked to respond to program-specific questions addressing their interest in the concentration and objectives for the program.

  • Applicants must indicate a preference for the concentration in Data Science in their application. Admission is competitive, and students who are admitted to the MScAC program are not automatically admitted to this concentration upon request.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • 1.0 FCE chosen from the STA2000-level courses or higher. This may include a maximum of 0.5 FCE chosen from the STA4500-level of six-week modular courses (0.25 FCE each).

    • 1.0 FCE chosen from the Computer Science (CSC course designator) graduate course listings.

    • 1.0 FCE in required courses:

      • CSC2701H Communication for Computer Scientists (0.5 FCE) and

      • CSC2702H Technical Entrepreneurship (0.5 FCE).

    • Course selections should be made in consultation with the Program Director.

  • An eight-month industrial internship, CSC2703H (3.5 FCEs). The internship is coordinated by the department and evaluated on a pass/fail basis.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

 

MScAC Program (Quantum Computing Concentration)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Computer Science's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor’s degree from a recognized university in a related area such as physics, computer science, mathematics, or any discipline where there is a significant quantitative component. The completed bachelor’s degree must include significant exposure to physics, computer science, and mathematics, including coursework in advanced quantum mechanics, multivariate calculus, linear algebra, probability and statistics, programming languages, and computational methods.

  • A standing equivalent to at least B+ in the final year of undergraduate studies.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who have graduated from a university where the primary language of instruction is not English must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with the following minimum scores:

    • Internet-based TOEFL: 93/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

    • IELTS: an overall score of 7.0, with at least 6.5 for each component.

  • If students complete a portion of their degree in English, or part of their degree at another university where English is the language of instruction, applicants must still provide proof of English-language proficiency.

  • Three letters of reference from faculty and/or employers, with preference for at least one such letter from a faculty member in Physics.

  • Applicants will be asked to respond to program-specific questions addressing their interest in the concentration and objectives for the program.

  • Applicants must indicate a preference for the concentration in Quantum Computing in their application. Admission is competitive, and students who are admitted to the MScAC program are not automatically admitted to this concentration upon request.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 1.0 FCE chosen from the Physics (PHY course designator) graduate course listings. Of eligible courses, the following are examples that are particularly relevant to the Quantum Computing concentration:

      • PHY1500H Statistical Mechanics (0.5 FCE)

      • PHY1520H Quantum Mechanics (0.5 FCE)

      • PHY1610H Scientific Computing for Physicists (0.5 FCE)

      • PHY2203H Quantum Optics I (0.5 FCE)

      • PHY2204H Quantum Optics II (0.5 FCE)

      • PHY2212H Entanglement Physics (0.5 FCE)

    • 1.0 FCE chosen from the Computer Science (CSC course designator) graduate course listings. Of eligible courses, the following are examples that are particularly relevant to the Quantum Computing concentration:

      • CSC2305H Numerical Methods for Optimization Problems (0.5 FCE)

      • CSC2421H Topics in Algorithms (0.5 FCE)

      • CSC2451H Quantum Computing, Foundations to Frontier (0.5 FCE)

    • 1.0 FCE in required courses:

      • CSC2701H Communication for Computer Scientists (0.5 FCE)

      • CSC2702H Technical Entrepreneurship (0.5 FCE)

    • Course selections should be made in consultation with the Program Director. Appropriate substitutions may be possible with approval.

  • An eight-month industrial internship, CSC2703H (3.5 FCEs). The internship is coordinated by the department and evaluated on a pass/fail basis.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus internship


Master of Science in Applied Computing

MScAC General Program (No Concentration)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

MScAC Program (Applied Mathematics Concentration)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

MScAC Program (Artificial Intelligence Concentration)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

MScAC Program (Data Science Concentration)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

MScAC Program (Quantum Computing Concentration)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Computer Science
Computer Science: Computer Science MSc

Master of Science

Program Description

The MSc degree program is designed for students seeking to be trained as a researcher capable of creating original, internationally recognized research in computer science.

The MSc program can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Computer Science's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree with a standing equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+. Preference is given to applicants who have studied computer science or a closely related discipline.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction is not English must achieve a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 580 on the paper-based test and 4 on the Test of Written English (TWE); 93/120 on the Internet-based test and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Completion of 2.0 graduate full-course equivalents (FCEs) in computer science. The courses must satisfy breadth in three of the four different Methodologies of Computer Science to ensure that MSc graduates have a breadth of skills for research and problem solving throughout their careers.

  • A major research paper (CSC4000Y; 1.0 FCE) demonstrating the student's ability to do independent work in organizing existing concepts and in suggesting and developing new approaches to solving problems in a research area. The standard for this paper is that it could reasonably be submitted for peer-reviewed publication.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F);
8 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework plus research paper



Master of Science
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F); 8 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Computer Science
Computer Science: Computer Science MScAC, MSc, PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please consult the department for course offerings.

Course Code Course Title
CSC2104H
Formal Methods of Program Design
CSC2107H
Compilers and Interpreters
CSC2108H Automated Verification
CSC2125H
Topics in Software Engineering
CSC2130H Empirical Research Methods in Software Engineering
(Exclusion: ECE1785H.)
CSC2206H
Computer Systems Modelling
CSC2208H
Advanced Operating Systems
CSC2209H
Computer Networks
CSC2221H
Introduction to Distributed Computing
CSC2222H Applications of Parallel and Distributed Computing
CSC2224H Parallel Computer Architecture and Programming
CSC2226H
Topics in Verification
CSC2227H
Topics in the Design and Implementation of Operating Systems
CSC2228H
Topics in Mobile, Pervasive, and Cloud Computing
CSC2231H
Topics in Computer Systems
CSC2233H
Topics in Storage Systems
CSC2240H Graphs, Matrices, and Optimization
CSC2302H Numerical Solutions of Initial Value Problems for Ordinary Differential Equations
CSC2305H
Numerical Methods for Optimization Problems
CSC2306H
High Performance Scientific Computing
CSC2310H
Computational Methods for Partial Differential Equations
CSC2321H
Matrix Calculations
CSC2326H
Topics in Numerical Analysis
CSC2332H Introduction to Quantum Algorithms
(Prerequisite: good knowledge of linear algebra and elementary real and complex analysis.)
CSC2401H Introduction to Computational Complexity
CSC2404H
Computability and Logic
CSC2405H Automata Theory
CSC2410H Introduction to Graph Theory
CSC2412H Algorithms for Private Data Analysis
(Prerequisite: CSC373 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.)
CSC2415H
Advanced Topics in the Theory of Distributed Computing
CSC2416H
Machine Learning Theory
CSC2417H Algorithms for Genome Sequence Analysis
CSC2419H Topics in Cryptography
CSC2420H Algorithm Design, Analysis, and Theory
CSC2421H Topics in Algorithms
CSC2426H
Fundamentals of Cryptography
CSC2429H
Topics in the Theory of Computation
CSC2431H Topics in Computational Biology and Medicine
CSC2451H Quantum Computing, Foundations to Frontier
(Exclusion: MAT1751H Quantum Computing, Foundations to Frontier.)
CSC2501H
Computational Linguistics
CSC2502H
Knowledge Representation and Reasoning
CSC2503H
Foundations of Computer Vision
CSC2504H Computer Graphics
CSC2506H
Probabilistic Learning and Reasoning
CSC2508H Advanced Data Systems
CSC2510H Topics in Information Systems
CSC2511H
Natural Language Computing
CSC2512H
Constraint Satisfaction Problems
CSC2513H Critical Thinking for Human Computer Interaction
(Prerequisite: CSC318 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.)
CSC2514H Human-Computer Interaction
CSC2515H
Introduction to Machine Learning
(Exclusion: ECE1513H.)
CSC2516H Neural Networks and Deep Learning
(Exclusion: MIE1517H.)
CSC2517H Discrete Mathematical Models of Sentence Structure
CSC2518H
Spoken Language Processing
CSC2520H Geometry Processing
CSC2521H Topics in Computer Graphics
CSC2523H
Object Modelling and Recognition
CSC2524H Topics in Interactive Computing
CSC2525H Research Topics in Database Management
CSC2526H HCI: Topics in Ubiquitous Computing
CSC2527H The Business of Software
CSC2528H
Advanced Computational Linguistics
CSC2529H Computational Imaging
CSC2530H Computer Vision for Advanced Digital Photography
CSC2532H
Statistical Learning Theory
(Prerequisite: CSC2515H.)
CSC2533H
Foundations of Knowledge Representation
CSC2536H Topics in Computer Science and Education
CSC2537H Information Visualization
CSC2539H
Topics in Computer Vision
CSC2540H Computational Cognitive Models of Language
CSC2541H
Topics in Machine Learning
CSC2542H
Topics in Knowledge Representation and Reasoning
CSC2545H Advanced Topics in Machine Learning
(Prerequisite: CSC2515H or equivalent is recommended.)
CSC2546H Computational Neuroscience
CSC2547H Current Algorithms and Techniques in Machine Learning
CSC2548H Machine Learning in Computer Vision
CSC2549H Physics-Based Animation
CSC2552H Topics in Computational Social Science
CSC2556H Algorithms for Collective Decision Making
CSC2558H Topics in Multidisciplinary HCI
CSC2559H Trustworthy Machine Learning
CSC2600H Topics in Computer Science
CSC2604H Topics in Human-Centred and Interdisciplinary Computing
CSC2606H Introduction to Continuum Robotics
(Prerequisite: Introduction to Robotics; e.g, CSC376 offered at UTM or AER525. Exclusion: CSC476 offered at UTM.)
CSC2611H Computational Models of Semantic Change
CSC2612H Computing and Global Development
(Prerequisite: CSC 318 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.)
CSC2615H Ethical Aspects of Artificial Intelligence
CSC2621H Topics in Robotics
(Prerequisite: CSC411H or CSC2515H.)
CSC2626H Imitation Learning for Robotics
(Prerequisite: CSC411/2515 Machine Learning and Data Mining or equivalent.)
CSC2630H Introduction to Mobile Robotics
(Required prerequisites: CSC209H, MAT223H, MAT232H, and STA256 or equivalent. Recommended prerequisites: CSC311H, CSC376H, CSC384H, and MAT224H or equivalent. Exclusions: AER1513H, CSC477H.)
CSC2699H Special Reading Course in Computer Science
CSC2701H
Communication for Computer Scientists
CSC2702H
Technical Entrepreneurship
CSC2703H
MScAC Internship
CSC2720H
Systems Thinking for Global Problems
CSC4000Y MSc Research Project in Computer Science
Computer Science
Computer Science: Computer Science PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The PhD degree program is designed for students seeking to be trained as a researcher capable of creating original, internationally recognized research in computer science. Research conducted under the supervision of a faculty member will constitute a significant and original contribution to computer science.

Applicants may enter the PhD program via one of two routes: 1) following completion of an appropriate master’s degree or 2) direct entry following completion of a bachelor’s degree.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Computer Science's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Successful completion of an appropriate master's degree with a standing equivalent to at least a University of Toronto B+. Preference is given to applicants who have studied computer science or a closely related discipline.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction is not English must achieve a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 580 on the paper-based test and 4 on the Test of Written English (TWE); or 93/120 on the Internet-based test and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) and a thesis.

  • The courses must satisfy breadth in four different research areas of computer science to ensure a broad and well-balanced knowledge of computer science.

  • Students must meet the department's timeline for satisfactory progress as outlined in the PhD handbook.

  • A meeting of the PhD supervisory committee must be held by the 16th month of the PhD program. This is typically the initial meeting with the supervisory committee and is referred to as the qualifying oral examination. After the qualifying oral, the student's PhD supervisory committee must meet at least once annually. The student must have their thesis topic approved at a PhD supervisory committee meeting within the time frame for achieving candidacy. The departmental thesis examination must be passed before the SGS Final Oral Examination can be scheduled.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Computer Science's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants may be admitted to this program directly from a bachelor's degree with a standing equivalent to at least a University of Toronto A–. Preference is given to applicants who have studied computer science or a closely related discipline.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction is not English must achieve a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of at least 580 on the paper-based test and 4 on the Test of Written English (TWE); or 93/120 on the Internet-based test and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) and a thesis.

  • The courses must satisfy breadth in four different research areas and three different methodologies of computer science to ensure a broad and well-balanced knowledge of computer science.

  • Students must meet the department's timeline for satisfactory progress as outlined in the PhD handbook.

  • A meeting of the PhD supervisory committee must be held by the 16th month of the PhD program. This is typically the initial meeting with the supervisory committee and is referred to as the qualifying oral examination. After the qualifying oral, the student's PhD supervisory committee must meet at least once annually. The student must have their thesis topic approved at a PhD supervisory committee meeting within the time frame for achieving candidacy. The departmental thesis examination must be passed before the SGS Final Oral Examination can be scheduled.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)
Program Length: 5 years
Time Limit: 7 years

 

Computer Science
Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies: Courses

Course List

Course Code Course Title
ASI1001H
Independent Research in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies
ASI1000Y
Issues in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies
ASI4140H The Public Event in Asia
ASI4200H Asia and the New Global Economy
ASI4300H Nationalism and Revolution in Asia
ASI4900H Special Topics in Contemporary Asian Studies

Please consult the website for courses offered by participating graduate units.

Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies (Collaborative Specialization)
Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies: Master's Level

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants who wish to enrol in the collaborative specialization must apply to and be admitted to both the collaborative specialization and a graduate degree program in one of the collaborating graduate units.

  • To be considered for admission to the collaborative specialization in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies, applicants are expected to have completed coursework on Asia or have had relevant working or living experience in East or Southeast Asia.

Specialization Requirements

  • Students must satisfy the degree requirements of both the home graduate unit and the collaborative specialization. This can be done concurrently with, or in addition to, home unit requirements.

  • Attend the year-long, interdisciplinary core seminar ASI1000Y Issues in Asia-Pacific Studies (1.0 full-course equivalent [FCE]). Topics vary from year to year.

  • Complete 0.5 elective FCE on East or Southeast Asia, or in Asia-related courses within the home graduate unit or any other units (subject to approval from the collaborative specialization director).

  • Complete a Major Research Paper, usually written in the context of a 0.5 FCE independent study course (for example, ASI1001H Independent Research in Asia-Pacific Studies). The Major Research Paper must address a topic on contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies, and be based on original and in-depth research that goes beyond a normal seminar paper at the graduate level. The length is approximately 50 to 60 pages, although certain types of research might well be communicated in formats of shorter length. The Major Research Paper requirement can be met in the home graduate unit for a major research paper, as long as the topic is related to Asia and is approved by the collaborative specialization director. In rare cases when a student undertakes a master's thesis in a home unit, the additional Major Research Paper will be waived. Students must seek approval for topics and format from the collaborative specialization director.

  • By the time of graduation from the master's degree program, every student is strongly encouraged to have a working knowledge of an East or Southeast Asian language as needed for his or her course of study.

Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies (Collaborative Specialization)
Criminology and Sociolegal Studies: Criminology and Sociolegal Studies MA

Master of Arts

Program Description

The MA program encompasses two related disciplinary and interdisciplinary fields.

The first is criminology, which can be briefly defined as the study of all aspects of crime, including its definitions, causes, and intellectual genealogy, as well as the policy and institutional responses to it. Although criminology features some aspects of a separate discipline, including its own theoretical schools, journals, and university departments, it also draws heavily on related social science disciplines.

The field of sociolegal studies, also known as the law and society movement, is a related interdisciplinary research tradition that investigates a broad range of legal phenomena using the techniques and approaches of social science. Examples of such phenomena that the faculty have studied include citizenship and immigration policy, urban planning, and the regulation of alcohol and sex work.

The program is distinctive in that these bodies of knowledge are treated as closely related, and both of them are incorporated into the program of study. Broad intellectual exploration of these fields is incorporated by limiting the number of required courses and encouraging students to select courses (both in this and other graduate programs) that reflect their own intellectual and professional priorities. Likewise, students are given the option of meeting their degree requirements by completing eight taught half-courses or by completing six taught half-courses and writing a “master’s research paper” that allows them to develop an independent research project under the supervision of a faculty member. While specialized professional or technical training meant to be directly transferable into criminal justice occupations is not provided, we welcome applications by criminal justice professionals who wish to pursue part-time studies.

The MA program enjoys an excellent national and international reputation, and graduates are sought by employers in both the public and private sectors who appreciate the theoretically and academically rigorous interdisciplinary social science training that is provided.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the additional admission requirements of the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies stated below.

  • Applicants must have an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university. An appropriate bachelor's degree normally consists of 20 full-course equivalents (FCEs). Applicants with arts and science degrees will normally be required to have at least a B+ standing. Applicants from law schools who have already completed a JD degree or its equivalent will normally be required to have at least a B standing.

  • Although many applicants to the MA program have some training in criminology or sociolegal studies, students from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary backgrounds are welcomed. It would be advantageous for MA students in the program to have some familiarity with the approaches and methodologies associated with the social sciences. However, outstanding students from the humanities and behavioral and natural sciences will also be considered.

  • The program can be completed on a full-time or part-time basis. All students will be required to complete the program within the time limits set for the MA degree under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Students with professional experience who meet the academic admission requirements are encouraged to apply to the program.

  • It is essential that all incoming graduate students have a command of English. Proficiency in the English language must be demonstrated by all applicants educated outside Canada whose primary language is not English, and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English. This requirement must be satisfied using a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a verbal and a written component. To be considered for admission, applicants must achieve the following minimum scores:

    • paper-based TOEFL exam: 580 and 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE)

    • Internet-based TOEFL exam: 93/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

    Official copies of these scores must be submitted to the University of Toronto before a formal offer of admission can be made.

Program Requirements

  • MA students can complete the program in one of two ways:

    • by completing 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) within 9 months or

    • by completing 3.0 FCEs and a research paper (CRI3360Y) within 12 months.

  • The degree program includes compulsory and elective courses.

    • The compulsory course (0.5 FCE) is CRI2010H Methodological Issues in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies.

    • The elective courses allow students to engage in specialized study of different approaches to, and topics within, criminology and sociolegal studies. The elective courses offered may vary from year to year. In certain cases a student may, with the approval of the Graduate Coordinator, substitute a maximum of 1.5 FCEs from other graduate units in lieu of elective courses in criminology or sociolegal studies.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S)
6 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework-only



Master of Arts
Program Length: 3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S) 6 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time


 

Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
Criminology and Sociolegal Studies: Criminology and Sociolegal Studies MA, PhD Courses

All courses are half courses (0.5 full-course equivalent [FCE]), with the exception of CRI3360Y0 Research Paper (1.0 FCE). Not all courses are offered every year. Consult the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies regarding course availability.

Due to space limitations, criminology graduate students will be given priority in graduate course enrolment. All other students must receive written permission from the instructor and the Graduate Coordinator before enrolling in any of the Centre's graduate courses.

Required Courses

Course Code Course Title
CRI1010Y0 Professional Development Workshops (Credit/No Credit)
CRI2010H
Methodological Issues in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

Elective Courses

Course Code Course Title
CRI1020H
Law and State Power: Theoretical Perspectives
CRI1030H Introduction to Science and Technology Studies: Sociolegal Approaches
CRI1050H Transnationalism, Culture, and Power (TCP)
CRI2120H Data Analysis
CRI2140H Guilt, Responsibility, and Forensics
CRI2150H Preventing Wrongful Convictions
CRI3020H
Criminology and the Policy-Making Process
CRI3110H
Qualitative Research Methods
CRI3130H
Policing
CRI3140H
Special Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
CRI3146H Inequality and Criminal Justice
CRI3150H Special Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
CRI3220H
Organized Crime and Corruption
CRI3240H
Penology
CRI3270H The Psychology of Criminal Behaviour: Theory and Practice
CRI3310H
Special Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
CRI3320H
The Criminal Process
CRI3330H
Contemporary Issues in Safety and Security
CRI3340H
Special Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
CRI3350H
Directed Research in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
CRI3351H
Directed Research in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
CRI3355H
Sentencing
CRI3356H
Youth Crime and Youth Justice
CRI3360Y0
MA Research Paper

0 Course that may continue over a program. Credit is given when the course is completed, or the course is graded when completed.

Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
Criminology and Sociolegal Studies: Criminology and Sociolegal Studies PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

Similar to the MA program, the PhD program reflects the same emphasis on interdisciplinarity and flexibility, as well as an integrated, inclusive approach to criminology and sociolegal studies.

The primary mission of the doctoral program is to prepare future professional academics for a career in teaching and research; graduates hold faculty positions throughout Canada, in the United States, and around the world.

Over the years, PhD students have pursued dissertation projects on extremely varied research questions involving aspects of crime, criminal justice institutions, and a range of sociolegal topics. Regardless of their specific focus, they have found the Centre a supportive and interactive environment. The Centre promotes such collegiality by offering students shared office space in the Centre and encouraging them to work on site and participate in the lively intellectual life and shared scholarly activities. Likewise, although PhD students work closely with a primary supervisor, they also benefit from opportunities to learn from other core and cross-appointed faculty members. In short, the goal is to train broadly educated, thoughtful scholars with a research agenda in criminology or sociolegal studies.

Students are normally paired with a prospective supervisor at the time of admission. Therefore, applicants are encouraged to identify one or more possible supervisors, as well as possible dissertation committee members, and should indicate on their application whether they have made contact with particular core or cross-appointed members of the graduate faculty for these purposes.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants normally hold an MA degree in criminology or a cognate field, with a minimum A– standing or its equivalent from a recognized university. Students with MAs in disciplines unrelated to criminology or sociolegal studies may be required to take additional courses as part of their doctoral program.

  • It is essential that all incoming graduate students have a command of English. Proficiency in the English language must be demonstrated by all applicants educated outside Canada whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English. This requirement must be satisfied using a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a verbal and a written component. To be considered for admission, applicants must achieve the following minimum scores:

    • paper-based TOEFL exam: 580 and 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE)

    • Internet-based TOEFL exam: 93/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

    Official copies of these scores must be submitted to the University of Toronto before a formal offer of admission can be made.

Program Requirements

  • Course requirements. Students must complete a minimum of 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) beyond those taken at the MA level. With approval of the Graduate Coordinator, a maximum of 1.5 FCEs of these may be from another graduate unit. Students must complete, at either the MA or the PhD level, the required research methods course (CRI2010H Methodological Issues in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies) and the required theory course (CRI1020H Law and State Power: Theoretical Perspectives). With the approval of the Graduate Coordinator, students can take a theory course offered through another graduate unit in lieu of CRI1020H. Students will normally complete all course requirements for the PhD in Year 1.

  • Professional development sequence. Year 1 doctoral students will participate in CRI1010Y (Credit/No Credit; 0.0 FCE), a sequence of eight monthly workshop meetings of approximately two hours in length led by one or more faculty members and dedicated to discussion of a range of important issues in graduate professional development. Meetings will be scheduled at the beginning of the academic year, and attendance will be taken at each meeting. Students must normally attend at least six workshop meetings by the end of the second session of Year 1 to complete this requirement, and those who do not do so must make up the required sessions by the end of the second session of Year 2.

  • One comprehensive exam. This exam must take the form of a major review paper. Students are required to read widely on a particular topic and identify and evaluate major theoretical debates and methodological issues. Students should provide an original, critical analysis of the literature and discuss possibilities for future work in their topic area. The comprehensive exam should normally be completed by the end of the second session of Year 2.

  • Language requirements. Students must have an adequate knowledge of a language other than English if an additional language is deemed essential for satisfactory completion of research for the thesis.

  • Thesis. PhD students must prepare an original thesis that is a significant contribution to knowledge in criminology or sociolegal studies. The thesis is a sustained piece of research written in an integrated series of chapters. The thesis is normally supervised by a member of the graduate faculty, with two other members of the graduate faculty serving on the thesis committee.

  • Residency. PhD students are required to be on campus full-time for the period of their program, except for approved field research and academic exchanges. Students are expected to participate in the Centre's activities associated with the program.

Program Length

4 years full-time

Time Limit

6 years full-time

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy
Program Length: 4 years full-time
Time Limit: 6 years full-time


 

Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
CTL: Curriculum and Pedagogy MA

Master of Arts

The MA degree program is designed to provide academic study and research training related to curriculum and pedagogy. Applicants who anticipate going on to further study at the PhD level are advised to apply for enrolment in an MA rather than an MEd degree program. The MA can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Admission normally requires an appropriate bachelor's degree, with the equivalent of at least a University of Toronto mid-B or better in the final year, in a relevant discipline or professional program.

  • Ordinarily, applicants will have at least one year of relevant, successful, professional experience prior to applying.

  • Responses to Faculty questions in the online admissions application: Applicants should state the reasons they wish to undertake a research-oriented program of study in curriculum and pedagogy. The chief academic interests and experience, professional concerns, and career plans related to any aspect of curriculum and pedagogy should be discussed. In order to identify their research interests in their responses to the Faculty questions, applicants should visit the Curriculum and Pedagogy program web page.

  • The Admissions Committee reviews these responses to determine the areas of study and/or problems of curriculum and pedagogy in which an applicant is most interested and to link the applicant to appropriate faculty advisors.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • At least 2.0 FCEs, normally CTL 1000-level courses undertaken in the Curriculum and Pedagogy program.

    • CTL1000H Foundations of Curriculum & Pedagogy (0.5 FCE).

    • A research methods course (0.5 FCE) from an approved course listing.

    • Additional courses may be required of some applicants, depending on previous experience and academic qualifications.

  • Thesis.

  • Students are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, thesis committee formation, and thesis ethical review.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S);
10 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework plus thesis



Master of Arts
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Curriculum and Pedagogy MA, MEd, PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please review the course schedule on the Registrar’s Office and Student Experience website.

Master's Level

Course Code Course Title
CTL1000H
Les fondements du curriculum et de la pédagogie
CTL1000H
Foundations of Curriculum & Pedagogy
CTL1001H
Values and Schooling
CTL1005H
Language, Literacy, and the School Curriculum
CTL1011H
Anti-Oppression Education in School Settings
CTL1011H
L’éducation pour l’anti-oppression en milieu scolaire
CTL1016H
Cooperative Learning Research and Practice
CTL1018H
Introduction to Qualitative Inquiry in Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning
CTL1023H
Technology and Education: Critical Perspectives on Theory and Practice
CTL1024H
Poststructuralism and Education
CTL1026H
Performed Ethnography
CTL1027H
Facilitating Reflective Professional Development
CTL1031H
Language, Culture, and Identity: Using the Literary Text in Teacher Development
CTL1033H
Multicultural Perspectives in Teacher Development: Reflective Practicum
CTL1036H
Thoughtful Teaching and Practitioner Inquiry
CTL1037H
Teacher Development: Comparative and Cross-Cultural Perspectives
CTL1041H
Research Methods In Education
CTL1042H
Instrument Development in Education
CTL1043H
Research Issues in Alternative Assessments
CTL1046H
Training Evaluation
CTL1047H
Course Self-Assessment
CTL1048H
Qualitative Methodology: Challenges and Innovations
CTL1049H Critical Practitioner Research in Education
CTL1060H
Education and Social Development
CTL1062H
Performed Ethnography and Research Informed Theatre
CTL1063H
Pedagogies of Solidarity
CTL1064H
Applied Theatre and Performance in Sites of Learning
CTL1065H
Gender, Sexuality, and Schooling
CTL1099H
Critical Approaches to Arts-Based Research
CTL1100H Arts in Urban Schools
(Exclusion: CTL5033H.)
CTL1104H
Play, Drama, and Arts Education
CTL1106H
Spirituality in Education
CTL1110H
The Holistic Curriculum
CTL1117H
Liberatory Practices in Drama and Education
CTL1119H
Gaining Confidence in Mathematics: A Holistic Approach to Rebuilding Math Knowledge and Overcoming Anxiety
CTL1120H
Effective Teaching Strategies in Elementary Mathematics Education: Research and Practice
CTL1121H Foundations of Wellness Through a Phenomenology of Practice
(Exclusion: CTL5045H.)
CTL1122H Exploring the Praxis of Environmental and Sustainability Education
(Exclusion: CTL5027H.)
CTL1200H
Science in the School Curriculum
CTL1202H
Mathematics in the School Curriculum: Elementary
CTL1206H
Teaching and Learning Science
CTL1207H
Teaching and Learning about Science: Issues and Strategies in Science, Technology, Society, and Environment (STSE) Education
CTL1208H
Curriculum Issues in Science and Technology: An Historical Perspective
CTL1209H
Current Issues in Science and Technology Education
CTL1211H
Action Research in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education
CTL1214H
Equity Issues in Science Education
CTL1215H
Teaching and Learning About Science and Technology: Beyond Schools
CTL1217H
Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Technology Curricula
CTL1218H
Culture and Cognition in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education
CTL1219H
Making Secondary Mathematics Meaningful
CTL1220H
Sociocultural Theories of Learning
CTL1221H
Education for Human Goals Local and Global: How's Science Education Helping?
CTL1222H
Environmental Studies in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education
CTL1223H
Activist Science and Technology Education
CTL1224H Curriculum Issues in Science Education
(Exclusion: CTL1799H.)
CTL1225H Mathematics Education: Linking Research and Practice
(Exclusion: CTL5040H.)
CTL1304H
Cultural Studies and Education
CTL1306H
La recherche qualitative en éducation: bases théoriques et pratiques
CTL1306H
Qualitative Research Methods in Education: Concepts and Methods
CTL1307H
Identité collective et éducation minoritaire de langue française
CTL1307H
Identity Construction and Education of Minorities
CTL1309H
Les stéréotypes sexuels dans les programmes scolaires
CTL1312H
Democratic Citizenship Education: Comparative International Perspectives
CTL1313H
Gender Equity in the Classroom
CTL1316H
Global Education: Theory and Practice
CTL1318H
Teaching Conflict and Conflict Resolution
CTL1319H
Religious Education: Comparative and International Perspectives
CTL1320H Introduction to Aboriginal Land-Centered Education: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
CTL1321H Aboriginal Civilization: Language, Culture, and Identity
CTL1322H Literacies of Land: Narrative, Storying, and Literature
CTL1325H Citizenship Education, Pedagogy, and School Communities
CTL1330H Education and Peacebuilding in Conflict Zones: International Comparative Perspectives
CTL1331H Land‐Centred Approaches to Research and Community Engagement
CTL1332H Introduction to Decolonization in Education
(Exclusion: CTL5010H.)
CTL1333H Settler Colonialism and Pedagogies of Oppression
(Exclusion: CTL5042H.)
CTL1400H
Classroom Adaptations and Instructional Strategies
CTL1402H
Adaptive Instruction in Inclusive Classrooms
CTL1403H
Special Education and Social Representation of Difference
CTL1406H
The Origins of Modern Schooling: Issues in the Development of the North American Educational System
CTL1407H
Rural Education and Social Reform in Canadian History, 1860–1960
CTL1424H
Religion, Ideology, and Social Movement in the Development of North American Education
CTL1426H
The History of Gender and Education in Canada
CTL1427H
Commemorating Canada, 1800s–1900s
CTL1428H
Immigration and the Development of Canadian Education
CTL1429H
Ethnicity and the Development of Canadian Education
CTL1430H
Gendered Colonialisms, Imperialisms, and Nationalisms in History
CTL1448H
Popular Culture and the Social History of Education II
CTL1454H
The Battle Over History Education in Canada
CTL1602H
Introduction to Computers in Education
CTL1603H
Introduction to Knowledge Building
CTL1604H
Video/Multimedia Design
CTL1606H
Computers in the Curriculum
CTL1608H
Constructive Learning and Design of Online Environments
CTL1609H
Educational Applications of Computer-Mediated Communication
CTL1611H
Computer-Mediated Distance Education
CTL1612H
The Virtual Library
(Non-credit.)
CTL1615H Introduction to AI in Education
(Exclusion: CTL5052H.)
CTL1616H Blended Learning: Issues and Applications
CTL1617H Social Media and Education
(Exclusion: CTL5015H.)
CTL1620H Foundations of Online Teaching and Learning
CTL1621H Design and Development of Online Content, Media, and Artifacts
CTL1622H Data Gathering and Assessment in Online Courses
CTL1623H Immersive Technology in Education
(Exclusion: CTL5047H.)
CTL1624H Instructional Design: Beyond the Lecture
(Exclusion: CTL5016H.)
CTL1625H Digital Media and Practices for a Knowledge Society
(Exclusion: CTL5036H.)
CTL1797H
Practicum in Curriculum & Pedagogy: Master's Level
CTL1798H
Individual Reading and Research in Curriculum & Pedagogy: Master's Level
CTL5010H to CTL5037H Special Topics in Curriculum: Master’s Level
CTL5036H Digital Media and Practices for a Knowledge Society
CTL5047H Immersive Technology in Education: Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Applications
CTL5700H to CTL5715H Special Topics in Teaching

Doctoral Level

Course Code Course Title
CTL1808H
Curriculum Innovation in Teacher Education
CTL1809H
Narrative and Story in Research and Professional Practice (RM)
CTL1811H
Writing Research/Research Writing: Moving from Idea to Reality
CTL1812H
Professional Ethics of Teaching and Schooling
CTL1817H
Current Issues in Teacher Education
CTL1818H
Arts in Education: Concepts, Contexts, and Frameworks
CTL1819H
Multicultural Literature in the Schools: Critical Perspectives and Practices
CTL1822H
Urban School Research: Youth, Pedagogy, and the Arts
CTL1825H
The Teacher as a Contemplative Practitioner
CTL1841H
Research Seminar in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education
CTL1844H
Seminar in Evaluation Problems
(Prerequisite: CTL2803H, CTL1843H, or equivalent.)
CTL1899H
C&P Doctoral Proseminar in Curriculum & Pedagogy
CTL1926H
Knowledge Media and Learning
CTL1998H,Y
Individual Reading and Research in Curriculum & Pedagogy: Doctoral Level
CTL6000H
Special Topics in C&P: Doctoral Level
Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Curriculum and Pedagogy MA, MEd, PhD Emphases

Emphasis: Arts in Education

The emphasis in Arts in Education offers students specialized courses in the areas of music and sound; drama, theatre, and performance; media and visual arts; and other courses that manifest social justice concerns reflected through the arts and cultural production. This emphasis brings together students interested in the arts; elementary and secondary arts specialist teachers and community-based educators interested in arts education in the broader community. They are a vibrant community of scholars and graduate students who thrive on collegiality, intellectual debate, critical analyses, and creative inquiry.

  • Coursework. From the following course list, MA, MEd, and PhD students must successfully complete 1.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs), which are counted towards the total FCEs required for the student's degree program:

    • CTL1062H, CTL1064H, CTL1099H, CTL1100H, CTL1104H, CTL1322H, CTL1811H, CTL1818H, CTL1822H, CTL3034H, CTL5013H, CTL5018H, CTL5019H, CTL5020H, CTL5048H.

  • Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and the successful completion of the degree requirements, students may make a request to the C&P Program Administrator to have the emphasis noted on the student transcript. This request must be made before graduation. A course can only be applied to the requirements of a single emphasis.

 

Emphasis: Critical Studies in Curriculum and Pedagogy

The emphasis in Critical Studies in Curriculum and Pedagogy (CSCP) encourages a critical exploration of educational phenomena, within and beyond the scope of schools, from local place-based and transnational comparative perspectives. CSCP courses focus on social justice issues in education, including those related to environmental justice, globalization, colonialism, race, disability, gender, sexuality, conflict-peace, and cultural and linguistic differences.

  • Coursework. From the following course list, MA, MEd, and PhD students must successfully complete 1.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs), which are counted towards the total FCEs required for the student's degree program:

    • CTL1011H, CTL1024H, CTL1031H, CTL1037H, CTL1048H, CTL1049H, CTL1062H, CTL1063H, CTL1064H, CTL1065H, CTL1099H, CTL1218H, CTL1219H, CTL1220H, CTL1221H, CTL1304H, CTL1306H, CTL1307H, CTL1312H, CTL1313H, CTL1318H, CTL1319H, CTL1330H, CTL1818H, CTL1822H, CTL3031H, CTL3034H, CTL5010H, CTL5048H, CTL5049H, CTL5050H, CTL5054H, CTL5055H.

  • Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and the successful completion of the degree requirements, students may make a request to the C&P Program Administrator to have the emphasis noted on the student transcript. This request must be made before graduation. A course can only be applied to the requirements of a single emphasis.

 

Emphasis: Digital Technologies in Education

The emphasis in Digital Technologies in Education engages educators in an examination of technology and its effective use in educational contexts. Drawing on research from the fields of the learning sciences, psychology, diversity studies, and information and communication technology, learners will deepen their understanding of such topics as knowledge-building, computational thinking, gamification of learning, online knowledge communities, social media, immersive technologies (virtual reality, augmented reality), technology and assessment, and mobile learning.

  • Coursework. From the following course list, MA, MEd, and PhD students must successfully complete 1.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs), which are counted towards the total FCEs required for the student's degree program:

    • CTL1602H, CTL1603H, CTL1606H, CTL1608H, CTL1609H, CTL1615H, CTL1616H, CTL1617H, CTL1620H, CTL1621H, CTL1622H, CTL1623H, CTL1624H, CTL1625H, CTL1926H, CTL5011H, CTL5038H.

  • Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and the successful completion of the degree requirements, students may make a request to the C&P Program Administrator to have the emphasis noted on the student transcript. This request must be made before graduation. A course can only be applied to the requirements of a single emphasis.

 

Emphasis: Indigenous Education and Decolonization

The emphasis in Indigenous Education and Decolonization not only examines the complex and tangled histories of those on whose traditional lands OISE/University of Toronto is situated — the Ouendat (Wyandot-Huron), Onondowahgah (Seneca-) and the Misi-zaagiing (Mississaugas-Anishinaabek) nations — but also extends to lands across Turtle Island and Abya-Yala. Tkaronto, as a starting place to understand Indigenous Education and Decolonization more globally, is subject to the Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement between the Hodenosaunee and the Anishinaabe and allied nations to peaceably share and care for the resources around the Great Lakes regions.

This emphasis will provide an entry point into the knowledge systems that emerge from this particular land, with an emphasis on land itself as a teacher and a source of knowledge. The emphasis will be grounded on a decolonial pedagogy, with a commitment to anti-colonization and decolonization practices. Recognizing that these lands have existed, and still do exist, first and foremost in relationship to Indigenous people requires a critical consciousness and acknowledgement of whose traditional lands we are now on as well as the historical and contemporary realities of those relationships. It is this understanding that forms the philosophical foundation upon which all of our courses position themselves within the emphasis.

  • Coursework. From the following course list, MA, MEd, and PhD students must successfully complete 1.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs), which are counted towards the total FCEs required for the student's degree program:

    • CTL1063H, CTL1110H, CTL1320H, CTL1321H, CTL1322H, CTL1331H, CTL1332H, CTL5039H, CTL5049H, CTL5050H, CTL5053H, CTL5054H, CTL5056H.

  • Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and the successful completion of the degree requirements, students may make a request to the C&P Program Administrator to have the emphasis noted on the student transcript. This request must be made before graduation. A course can only be applied to the requirements of a single emphasis.

 

Emphasis: Science, Mathematics and Technology (SMT)

The emphasis in SMT is dedicated to exploring theory, practice, and contemporary issues pertaining to SMT education in diverse settings and contexts. They are a vibrant community of scholars and graduate students who thrive on collegiality, intellectual debate, critical analyses, and inquiry.

Drawing on research and practice, students will explore and critique SMT education while supporting research, curriculum development, teaching, and innovation. With strong connections to the SMT Centre, and the collaborative specialization in Engineering Education, students will engage deeply with topics such as science, technology engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education; SMT education in formal and informal settings; equity; inclusion; diversity; activism; and social and environmental justice.

  • Coursework. From the following course list, MA, MEd, and PhD students must successfully complete 1.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs), which are counted towards the total FCEs required for the student's degree program:

    • CTL1119H, CTL1120H, CTL1202H, CTL1206H, CTL1207H, CTL1209H, CTL1214H, CTL1215H, CTL1217H, CTL1218H, CTL1219H, CTL1221H, CTL1222H, CTL1223H, CTL1224H, CTL1225H, CTL1602H, CTL1606H, CTL1608H, CTL1609H, CTL1841H, CTL1926H, CTL5043H, CTL5044H.

  • Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and the successful completion of the degree requirements, students may make a request to the C&P Program Administrator to have the emphasis noted on the student transcript. This request must be made before graduation. A course can only be applied to the requirements of a single emphasis.

 

Emphasis: Wellbeing

The purpose of education should be to move people toward improved connectedness and happiness, as well as to further accomplish and to develop greater opportunities for growth. The emphasis in Wellbeing provides hope and healing for individuals and society through innovative educational experiences by helping people deal well and wisely with issues in their lives and times. The mission is to provide critical educational experiences that awaken the best in the human spirit by addressing issues of public concern.

Critical issues investigated through coursework may be related to mental health, environmental issues, and destructive ethnocentric patterns of behaviour, as well as the wise and ethical use of technology. In addition, strategies for managing anxiety and depression, and for raising awareness of inequitable and discriminatory conditions are similar across differing contexts. Therefore, one must examine one’s own life and circumstances and larger societal and institutional contexts before taking informed action for the greater good of all people.

The goal is agency through self-advocacy and advocacy for others. Through this process, one does not merely deconstruct but also reconstructs through learning about how one’s belief structures and patterns may become more beneficial to oneself and to those around. More specifically, these holistic approaches involve various forms such as narrative/biography, phenomenology, meditation, mindfulness practice, body work, mental health, and conscious use of technology.

  • Coursework. From the following course list, MA, MEd, and PhD students must successfully complete 1.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs), which are counted towards the total FCEs required for the student's degree program:

    • CTL1016H, CTL1027H, CTL1106H, CTL1110H, CTL1121H, CTL1319H, CTL1331H, CTL1424H, CTL1817H, CTL1825H, CTL3037H, CTL5011H, CTL5042H.

  • Upon successful completion of the emphasis requirements and the successful completion of the degree requirements, students may make a request to the CSTD Program Administrator to have the emphasis noted on the student transcript. This request must be made before graduation. A course can only be applied to the requirements of a single emphasis.

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Curriculum and Pedagogy MEd

Master of Education

The Master of Education (MEd) degree program is designed chiefly for the professional development of those who are already engaged in a career related to education, broadly defined. Applicants who anticipate going on to further study at the PhD level are advised to apply for enrolment in an MA rather than an MEd degree program. The MEd program is offered as a general program (no field) or as an Online Teaching and Learning field. The field in Online Teaching and Learning is designed for students interested in engaging with scholarly research in distance education and who want to learn how to effectively instruct and design online courses.

The MEd can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Note: The MEd is not a teacher certification program. Find out more about teacher certification programs.

MEd General Program (No Field)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies, which specify an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university. This degree must be completed with an academic standing equivalent to a University of Toronto mid-B or better in the final year. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Ordinarily, applicants will have at least one year of relevant, successful, professional experience prior to applying.

  • Responses to Faculty questions in the online admissions application: applicants should state the reasons they wish to study curriculum at the graduate level. The chief academic interests, professional concerns, and career plans related to curriculum studies and teacher development should be discussed. In order to identify their research interests in the responses to the Faculty questions, applicants should visit the Curriculum and Pedagogy program web page. The admissions committee reviews these responses to determine the kind of focus or area of study in which an applicant is most interested and to link the applicant to appropriate faculty advisors.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • At least 2.5 FCEs, normally CTL 1000-level courses undertaken in the Curriculum and Pedagogy program.

    • CTL1000H Foundations of Curriculum & Pedagogy (0.5 FCE).

  • Additional study may be required either within the degree program or prior to admission, depending on previous experience and academic qualifications.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F);
10 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework-only



Master of Education
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Curriculum and Pedagogy MEd; Field: Online Teaching and Learning

Master of Education

The Master of Education (MEd) degree program is designed chiefly for the professional development of those who are already engaged in a career related to education, broadly defined. Applicants who anticipate going on to further study at the PhD level are advised to apply for enrolment in an MA rather than an MEd degree program. The MEd program is offered as a general program (no field) or as an Online Teaching and Learning field. The field in Online Teaching and Learning is designed for students interested in engaging with scholarly research in distance education, who want to learn how to effectively instruct and design online courses.

The MEd can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Note: The MEd is not a teacher certification program. Find out more about teacher certification programs.

Field: Online Teaching and Learning

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies, which specify an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university. This degree must be completed with an academic standing equivalent to a University of Toronto mid-B or better in the final year. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Ordinarily, applicants will have at least one year of relevant, successful, professional experience prior to applying.

  • Responses to Faculty questions in the online admissions application: applicants should state the reasons they wish to study curriculum at the graduate level. The chief academic interests, professional concerns, and career plans related to curriculum studies and teacher development should be discussed. In order to identify their research interests in their responses to the Faculty questions, applicants should visit the Curriculum and Pedagogy program web page. The admissions committee reviews these responses to determine the kind of focus or area of study in which an applicant is most interested and to link the applicant to appropriate faculty advisors.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete a total of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • 1.5 FCEs in required courses: CTL1000H, CTL1620H, and CTL1624H.

    • 1.5 FCEs from the following: CTL1603H, CTL1606H, CTL1608H, CTL1609H, CTL1615H, CTL1616H, CTL1617H, CTL1621H, CTL1622H, CTL1623H, CTL1625H, CTL1926H.

    • 2.0 FCEs in elective courses.

  • Additional study may be required either within the degree program or prior to admission, depending on previous experience and academic qualifications.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F);
10 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework-only



Master of Education (Field: Online Teaching and Learning)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Curriculum and Pedagogy PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

The PhD program demands a strong commitment to research. The Curriculum and Pedagogy program offers both full-time and flexible-time PhD program options. Degree requirements for both options are the same; only the length of time to completion differs (see Program Length below). Applicants must declare the option for which they wish to apply.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A master's degree in education from a recognized university with a grade equivalent to a University of Toronto B+ or better and in the same area of specialization as proposed at the doctoral level is required. Further documentation may be required to establish equivalence.

  • Applicants ordinarily have a minimum of two years' professional experience prior to applying.

  • Applicants are required to submit, along with the application:

    • Their master's thesis or a sample of single-authored scholarly writing; for details about what constitutes an appropriate writing sample, visit the Curriculum and Pedagogy program web page.

    • Responses to Faculty questions in the online admissions application describing their intellectual interests and concerns relevant to curriculum and pedagogy, reasons for wishing to take the program, previous qualifications and professional experiences, and articulating their research and professional interests, and future career goals

    • Two letters of reference: one academic and one professional.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must normally complete 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • At least 2.0 FCEs, normally CTL 1000-level courses.

    • CTL1899H C&P Doctoral Proseminar in Curriculum & Pedagogy (0.5 FCE).

    • Students are expected to take CTL1000H Foundations of Curriculum & Pedagogy (0.5 FCE) if they did not complete it at the master's level

    • Additional courses may be required of some students.

    • One research methods course (0.5 FCE) from an approved course listing.

  • Comprehensive examination (PDF).

  • A thesis embodying the results of an original investigation, and a Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the content and implications of the thesis.

  • Students are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, thesis committee formation, comprehensive examination, and thesis ethical review.

  • Full-time PhD students must maintain full-time status throughout their program of study.

  • Students must register continuously and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been fulfilled.

  • Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • A master's degree in education from a recognized university with a grade equivalent to a University of Toronto B+ or better and in the same area of specialization as proposed at the doctoral level is required. Further documentation may be required to establish equivalence.

  • Applicants ordinarily have a minimum of two years' professional experience prior to applying.

  • Applicants are required to submit, along with the application:

    • Their master's thesis or a sample of single-authored scholarly writing; for details about what constitutes an appropriate writing sample, visit the Curriculum and Pedagogy program web page.

    • Responses to Faculty questions in the online admissions application describing their intellectual interests and research concerns relevant to curriculum and pedagogy, reasons for wishing to take the program, previous qualifications and professional experiences, and articulating their research and professional interests, and future career goals.

    • Two letters of reference: one academic and one professional.

  • Applicants to the flexible-time PhD option are accepted under the same admission requirements as applicants to the full-time PhD option. Applicants must demonstrate that they are currently employed and are active professionals engaged in activities relevant to their proposed program of study.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must normally complete a total of 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • At least 2.0 FCEs, normally CTL 1000-level courses.

    • CTL1899H C&P Doctoral Proseminar in Curriculum & Pedagogy (0.5 FCE).

    • Students are expected to take CTL1000H Foundations of Curriculum & Pedagogy (0.5 FCE) if they did not complete it at the master's level.

    • One research methods course (0.5 FCE) from an approved course listing.

    • Additional courses may be required of some students.

  • Comprehensive examination (PDF).

  • A thesis embodying the results of an original investigation, and a Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the content and implications of the thesis.

  • Students are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, thesis committee formation, comprehensive examination, and thesis ethical review.

  • Students must register continuously until all degree requirements have been fulfilled. They must register full-time during the first four years and may continue as part-time thereafter, with their department's approval.

  • Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Program Length

8 years

Time Limit

8 years

Coursework plus thesis


Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)
Program Length: 8 years
Time Limit: 8 years

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Language and Literacies Education MA

Master of Arts

Applicants expecting to pursue a doctorate in the future are advised to enrol in the MA (rather than the MEd) program in Language and Literacies Education (LLE). The MA program can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Admission requires an appropriate bachelor's degree, with the equivalent of a University of Toronto mid-B or better in the final year, in a relevant discipline or professional program. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Ordinarily, applicants should have teacher certification and at least one year of relevant successful professional experience prior to applying.

  • Responses to Faculty questions in the online admissions application: for detailed information on presenting research interests while answering the Faculty questions, applicants should visit the Language and Literacies in Education MA degree program web page.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) or eight half courses as follows.

    • A minimum of 2.0 FCEs in CTL 3000-level courses within the LLE program including CTL3001H Research Colloquium in Language and Literacies Education (0.5 FCE).

    • A research methods course relevant to the topic of the thesis (0.5 FCE). Any of the following courses can fulfil this requirement: CTL1018H, CTL1041H, CTL1306H, CTL3033H, CTL3807H, CTL3810H, APD1296H, APD3202H, JOI1287H, JOI1288H, JOI3228H, or SJE1905H.

    • Students wishing to propose an alternative course to fulfil one of the LLE course requirements will be required to obtain the approval of both the LLE graduate program coordinator and either their faculty advisor or their thesis supervisor.

    • Additional courses may be required of some applicants.

  • Thesis.

  • Students are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, thesis committee formation, and thesis ethical review.

Program Length

6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S);
10 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework plus thesis



Master of Arts
Program Length: 6 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W/S); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Language and Literacies Education MA, MEd, PhD Courses

Not all courses are offered every year. Please review the course schedule on the Registrar’s Office and Student Experience website.

Master's Level

Course Code Course Title
APD1251H Reading in a Second Language
APD1296H
Assessing School-Aged Language Learners
CTL3000H
Foundations of Bilingual and Multicultural Education
CTL3001H
Research Colloquium in Language and Literacies Education
CTL3002H
Second Language Teaching Methodologies
CTL3003H
Planning and Organizing the Second Language Curriculum
CTL3004H
Language Awareness and its Role in Teacher Development
CTL3007H
Discourse Analysis
(Exclusion: CTL3200H.)
CTL3008H
Critical Pedagogy, Language, and Cultural Diversity
CTL3010H
Second Language Learning
CTL3011H
Cognitive, Sociolinguistic, and Sociopolitical Orientations in Bilingual Education Research
(Exclusion: CTL3201H.)
CTL3013H
Language Assessment
CTL3015H
Language and Literacies Education in Multilingual Contexts
CTL3018H
Language Planning and Policy
(Exclusion: CTL3202H.)
CTL3020H
Writing in a Second Language
CTL3024H
Language Teacher Education
CTL3025H
Educational Sociolinguistics
CTL3026H
Pragmatics in Language Education
CTL3028H
Literacy in Elementary Education
CTL3029H
Children's Literature as a Foundation of Literate Behaviour Across the Curriculum
CTL3030H
Theory and Practice in Elementary Literacy Instruction
CTL3031H
Children's Literature Within a Multicultural Context
CTL3032H
Teaching Writing in the Classroom
CTL3033H
Literary Research Methodologies
CTL3034H
New Literacies: Making Multiple Meanings
CTL3035H
Critical Literacy in Action
CTL3036H
Expressive Writing: Practice and Pedagogy
CTL3037H
Biography in Educational Contexts
CTL3038H Play, Language, and Literacy in Primary Classrooms
(Exclusion: CTL5302H.)
CTL3039H Academic English Research and Acquisition
(Credit/No Credit. Exclusion: CTL5305H.)
CTL3040H The Education of Students of Refugee Background in Canada and Beyond
(Exclusion: CTL5310H.)
CTL3041H Theories in Vocabulary Teaching and Learning
(Exclusion: CTL5314H.)
CTL3100H
Communication and Second Language Learning in the Workplace
CTL3101H
Language Awareness for Language Educators
CTL3200H Analyse du discours
(Exclusion: CTL3007H.)
CTL3201H Bilinguisme et éducation
(Exclusion: CTL3011H.)
CTL3202H Politique et aménagement linguistique
(Exclusion: CTL3018H.)
CTL3203H Les approches pédagogiques plurilingues et pluriculturelles en éducation
(Exclusion: CTL5311H.)
CTL3410H
Schooling in the Movies: Education as Reflected in Hollywood Films
CTL3411H
Cinema and Historical Literacy
CTL3412H
Shakespeare and Cultural Literacy
CTL3413H
Reading Cinema and Cultural Identity
CTL3414H
Historical Literacy and Popular Literacy
CTL3415H
Educational Thought and Historical Literature
CTL3797H
Practicum in Language and Literacies Education: Master's Level (Credit/No Credit)
CTL3798H
Individual Reading and Research in Language and Literacies Education: Master's Level
CTL3811H Critical Perspectives on Language, Racism, and Settler-Colonialism
(Exclusion: CTL6301H.)
CTL3899H Proseminar in Language and Literacies Education Program: Master's Level
CTL5300H
Special Topics in Language and Literacies Education Program: Master's Level
CRE1001H Séminaire d’études : Éducation, francophonies et diversité
JTE1952H
Language, Culture, and Education

Doctoral Level

Course Code Course Title
CTL3805H
Multilingualism and Plurilingualism
CTL3806H
Sociocultural Theory and Second Language Learning
CTL3807H
Second Language Education Research Methods (RM)
CTL3808H
The Role of Instruction in Second Language Learning
CTL3810H
Second Language Classroom Research Methods
CTL3899H Proseminar in Language and Literacies Education
CTL3998H
Individual Reading and Research in Language and Literacies Education: Doctoral Level
CTL6300H
Special Topics in Language and Literacies Education Program: Doctoral Level
Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Language and Literacies Education MEd

Master of Education

The Master of Education (MEd) degree program can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies, which specify an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university, with the equivalent of a University of Toronto mid-B or better in the final year. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Ordinarily, applicants should have teacher certification and at least one year of relevant successful professional experience prior to applying.

  • Responses to Faculty questions in the online admissions application: applicants should state the reasons they wish to study language and literacies in education at the graduate level. For detailed information on answering the Faculty questions and completing the application, applicants should visit the Language and Literacies in Education MEd degree program web page.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. The MEd program consists of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • A minimum of 2.5 FCEs in CTL 3000-level courses.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F);
10 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Coursework-only



Master of Education
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F); 10 sessions part-time
Time Limit: 3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Language and Literacies Education MEd; Field: Language Teaching

Master of Education (Field: Language Teaching)

Within the existing Master of Education (MEd) degree program, the field in Language Teaching includes a structured focus on language teaching foundations. Language Teaching integrates an engagement with scholarly research in Language and Literacies Education with a commitment to excellence in teaching to support graduate students as novice language teachers. Students pursuing this field will graduate with: (a) a solid theoretical and intellectual grounding in LLE research; (b) a course-based, practitioner focus on language teaching foundations; and (c) gained practical experience in a language-education context through a required practicum.

This field is only available on a full-time basis. Priority will be given to novice teachers with less than a year of teaching experience. This field will not lead to Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) Ontario certification nor to the Certificate of Qualification and Registration with the Ontario College of Teachers.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies, which specify an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university, with the equivalent of a University of Toronto mid-B or better in the final year. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Normally, applicants should have at least one year of professional experience prior to applying. Previous classroom teaching experience is not a requirement.

  • Responses to Faculty questions in the online admissions application: applicants should state the reasons they wish to study language and literacies in education at the graduate level. For detailed information on answering the Faculty questions and completing the application, applicants should visit the Language and Literacies in Education MEd Field in Language Teaching degree program web page.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Within the MEd program, the Language Teaching field consists of 5.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows.

    • All students in this field must take the following three courses (1.5 FCEs):

      • CTL3002H Second Language Teaching Methodologies

      • CTL3010H Second Language Learning

      • CTL3797H Practicum in Language and Literacies Education: Master's Level (Credit/No Credit)

    • Students must then choose any two of the following courses (1.0 FCE):

      • CTL3000H Foundations of Bilingual and Multicultural Education

      • CTL3003H Planning and Organizing the Second Language Curriculum

      • CTL3008H Critical Pedagogy, Language, and Cultural Diversity

      • CTL3013H Language Assessment

      • CTL3020H Writing in a Second Language

      • CTL3039H Academic English Research and Acquisition (Credit/No Credit)

      • CTL3101H Language Awareness for Language Educators

    • The remaining 2.5 FCEs can be elective courses taken towards the requirements of a collaborative specialization if applicable, or courses offered within the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning or other departments at OISE or the University of Toronto.

Program Length

4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework-only



Master of Education (Field: Language Teaching)
Program Length: 4 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F)
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Language and Literacies Education PhD

Doctor of Philosophy

Students participating in the PhD program must have a strong commitment to research. The Language and Literacies Education (LLE) program offers both full-time and flexible-time PhD options. Degree requirements for the full-time and flexible-time options are the same. Applicants must declare their preferred option when applying.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate master's degree with a grade equivalent to a University of Toronto B+ or better from a recognized university is required.

  • Admission is contingent upon satisfactory completion of a master's thesis, or the equivalent in the form of a scholarly piece of writing.

  • Ordinarily, applicants will have a minimum of two years of relevant professional experience prior to applying.

  • Responses to Faculty questions in the online admissions application: applicants should state the reasons they wish to study language and literacies in education at the graduate level. For detailed information on answering the Faculty questions and completing the application, applicants should visit the Language and Literacies in Education PhD degree program web page.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 3.5 to 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) depending on previous experience and academic qualifications, as follows:

    • A minimum of 2.0 FCEs within the LLE program, including CTL3001H Research Colloquium in Language and Literacies Education (0.5 FCE) and CTL3899H Proseminar in Language and Literacies Education (0.5 FCE), if not previously taken at the master's level. If CTL3001H or CTL3899H was taken at the master's level, students are not permitted to take it again and should substitute it with another LLE program course (0.5 FCE).

    • A research methods course relevant to the topic of the thesis (0.5 FCE). Any of the following courses can fulfil this requirement: CTL1018H, CTL1041H, CTL1306H, CTL3033H, CTL3807H, CTL3810H, APD1296H, APD3202H, JOI1287H, JOI1288H, JOI3228H, or SJE1905H.

    • A student wishing to propose an alternative course to fulfil one of the LLE course requirements must obtain the approval of the LLE program coordinator and either their faculty advisor or thesis supervisor.

  • Comprehensive examination (PDF).

  • A thesis embodying the results of an original investigation, and a Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the content and implications of the thesis.

  • Students are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, thesis committee formation, comprehensive examination, and thesis ethical review.

  • Full-time PhD students must maintain full-time status throughout their program of study.

  • Students must register continuously and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been fulfilled.

  • Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate master's degree with a grade equivalent to a University of Toronto B+ or better from a recognized university is required.

  • Admission is contingent upon satisfactory completion of a master's thesis, or the equivalent in the form of a scholarly piece of writing.

  • Ordinarily, applicants will have a minimum of two years of relevant professional experience prior to applying.

  • Responses to Faculty questions in the online admissions application: applicants should state the reasons they wish to study language and literacies in education at the graduate level. For detailed information on answering the Faculty questions and completing the application, applicants should visit the Language and Literacies in Education PhD degree program web page.

  • Applicants must demonstrate that they are currently employed and are active professionals engaged in activities relevant to their proposed program of study.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 3.5 to 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) depending on previous experience and academic qualifications, as follows:

    • A minimum of 2.0 FCEs within the LLE program, including CTL3001H Research Colloquium in Language and Literacies Education (0.5 FCE), if not previously taken at the master's level. If CTL3001H was taken at the master's level, students are not permitted to take it again and should substitute it with another LLE program course (0.5 FCE).

    • CTL3899H Proseminar in Language and Literacies Education (0.5 FCE), if not previously taken at the master's level. If CTL3899H was taken at the master's level, students are not permitted to take it again and should substitute it with another LLE program course (0.5 FCE).

    • A research methods course relevant to the topic of the thesis (0.5 FCE). Any of the following courses can fulfil this requirement: CTL1018H, CTL1041H, CTL1306H, CTL3033H, CTL3807H, CTL3810H, APD1296H, APD3202H, JOI1287H, JOI1288H, JOI3228H, or SJE1905H.

    • A student wishing to propose an alternative course to fulfil one of the LLE course requirements will be required to obtain the approval of the LLE program coordinator and either their faculty advisor or thesis supervisor.

  • Comprehensive examination (PDF).

  • A thesis embodying the results of an original investigation, and a Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the content and implications of the thesis.

  • Students are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, thesis committee formation, comprehensive examination, and thesis ethical review.

  • Students must register continuously until all degree requirements have been fulfilled. They must register full-time during the first four years and may continue as part-time thereafter, with their department's approval.

  • Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Program Length

7 years

Time Limit

8 years

Coursework plus thesis



Doctor of Philosophy

PhD Program
Program Length: 4 years
Time Limit: 6 years

PhD Program (Flexible-Time)
Program Length: 7 years
Time Limit: 8 years

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Teaching MT

Master of Teaching

Program Description

This program involves two years of full-time study leading to a Master of Teaching (MT) degree. Upon successful completion of this program, students will be recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for an Ontario Teachers' Certificate of Qualification, which qualifies them to teach in either the Primary and Junior (P/J) divisions, the Junior and Intermediate (J/I) divisions, or the Intermediate and Senior (I/S) divisions of Ontario schools.

The MT program offers students a unique educational opportunity, which combines teacher qualification with advanced study of educational theory and an opportunity to conduct research. The program provides students with a strong grounding in curriculum; human development; ethics and educational law; equity diversity and inclusion; Indigenous education; educational technology; instructional planning; instructional design; and learning theory. Students enjoy four practice teaching experiences in which they develop their skills as teachers and extend the theoretical and practical knowledge they acquired in the academic portion of the program.

The program includes: formal coursework, teaching and research seminars, and practice teaching.

The 20-month program is normally completed on a full-time basis in 5 terms:

  • Terms 1 and 2 (Fall and Winter sessions [September to April])

  • Term 3 (Summer session [May to August])

  • Terms 4 and 5 (Fall and Winter sessions [September to April]).

Registration in Terms 4 and 5 is contingent upon successful completion of all courses in Terms 1, 2, and 3 and two successful placements.

Applicants must select one of the following teaching divisions:

  • Primary/Junior (junior kindergarten to grade 6)

  • Junior/Intermediate (grades 4 to 10)

  • Intermediate/Senior (grades 7 to 12).

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Applicants must have an appropriate bachelor's degree with the equivalent of a University of Toronto mid-B or better in the final year.

  • In their Statement of Intent, applicants should indicate their preferred division (i.e., Primary/Junior, Junior/Intermediate, or Intermediate/Senior) and describe three significant teaching and/or teaching-related experiences that they have had, especially with groups of learners. With reference to these experiences, applicants should identify insights gained about teaching and learning, and explain how, based on these insights, they might contribute to the education of students in today's schools. In their resumé applicants are requested to list, in chart form, the extent of their teaching experiences. The chart should include dates, location of experience, role, and number of hours working with students. For details about the Statement of Intent, visit the MT program website.

  • Applicants to the Junior/Intermediate (J/I) division within the Elementary field must select one subject specialization, known as "teachable" or "teaching subject." Before applying to the J/I division, applicants must ensure they have the required number of prerequisite courses for the teaching subject. The prerequisites for teaching subjects in the J/I division are a minimum of 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) for the teaching subject from a recognized university. Note that the prerequisite for French (Second Language) is 5.0 FCEs. For more details about subject specializations and their prerequisites, visit the MT program website.

  • Applicants to the Intermediate/Senior (I/S) division within the Secondary field must have two subject specializations, known as "teachable" or "teaching subject", of which one subject is selected as their first subject specialization and one as their second subject specialization. Before applying to the I/S division, applicants must ensure they have the required number of prerequisite courses for the teaching subject. The prerequisites are a minimum of 6.0 FCEs in the first teaching subject and a minimum of 3.0 FCEs in the second teaching subject from a recognized university. Note that the prerequisites for the teaching subjects French (Second Language), Science-Biology, Science-Chemistry, Science-Physics, and Science-General are 6.0 FCEs regardless of whether these teaching subjects are first or second subject specializations. For more details about subject specializations and their prerequisites, visit the MT program website.

  • Not all eligible applicants are guaranteed admission.

  • A police record check is required in both Years 1 and 2 as part of the practice teaching experiences.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 11.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) consisting of:

    • 8.0 FCEs: 16 (or equivalent) compulsory core courses; Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate divisions include quarter-credit courses.

    • 1.0 FCE: 2 elective courses.

    • 2.0 FCEs: 4 practice teaching courses: CTL7080H, CTL7081H, CTL7082H, and CTL7083H. There is one placement per course, totalling four teaching placements.

  • On successful completion, students receive the MT degree and a recommendation to the Ontario College of Teachers for an Ontario Teachers' Certificate of Qualification.

  • Advanced standing is not granted in this program.

  • Students registered in the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate divisions must successfully complete the non-credit seminar course CTL7100H Mathematics Concepts for Elementary Teacher Candidates (0.0 FCE), also known as MathPlus, during their first session of registration.

Program Length

5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years full-time

Coursework plus project plus placement



Master of Teaching
Program Length: 5 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S/F/W);
Time Limit: 3 years full-time

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning
CTL: Teaching MT Courses

Primary/Junior Division (Junior Kindergarten to Grade 6)

Core Courses

Course Code Course Title
CTL7000H
Curriculum and Teaching in Literacy
CTL7001H
Educational Professionalism, Ethics, and Law
CTL7002H
Curriculum and Teaching in Mathematics
CTL7006H
Educational Research 1
CTL7008H
Introduction to Special Education and Mental Health
CTL7009H
Anti-Discriminatory Education
CTL7011H
Child and Adolescent Development and Learning
CTL7014H
Fundamentals of Teaching and Learning
CTL7015H
Educational Research 2
CTL7016H
Integrating Technology into the Classroom: Issues and Activities
CTL7018H
Curriculum and Teaching in Science and Environmental Education
CTL7019H
Supporting English Language Learners
CTL7072H
Curriculum and Teaching in Social Studies and Indigenous Education
CTL7080H Practice Teaching Year 1 (Part 1) (Credit/No Credit)
CTL7081H Practice Teaching Year 1 (Part 2) (Credit/No Credit)
CTL7082H Practice Teaching Year 2 (Part 1) (Credit/No Credit)
CTL7083H Practice Teaching Year 2 (Part 2) (Credit/No Credit)
CTL7084H Issues in Numeracy (0.25 FCE)
CTL7085H Issues in Literacy (0.25 FCE)
CTL7086H Curriculum and Teaching in Music and Dance (0.25 FCE)
CTL7087H Curriculum and Teaching in Drama and Dance (0.25 FCE)
CTL7088H Curriculum and Teaching in Visual Arts (0.25 FCE)
CTL7089H Curriculum and Teaching in Physical Education (0.25 FCE)
CTL7100H Mathematics Concepts for Elementary Teacher Candidates* (Non-credit)

*Students registered in the Primary/Junior division must successfully complete the non-credit seminar course CTL7100H Mathematics Concepts for Elementary Teacher Candidates, also known as MathPlus, during their first session of registration.

Elective Courses

  • Plus 1.0 FCE: two elective courses.

Junior/Intermediate Division (Grade 4 to Grade 10)

Core Courses

Course Code Course Title
CTL7000H
Curriculum and Teaching in Literacy
CTL7